HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Marionettes, Inc. by Ray Bradbury
Loading...

Marionettes, Inc. (1949)

by Ray Bradbury

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
431267,810 (3.72)1

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

I sing the body electric;
The armies of those I love engirth me,
and I engirth them,
They will not let me off till I go with them,
respond to them,
And discorrupt them,
and charge them full with the charge of the soul.

Walt Whitman

Bradbury's famous story of the electric grandmother leads off this slim book. The novelette "I Sing the Body Electric" is an old favorite of many Bradbury fans, including me. It had been a long time since I first read it. Like much of Bradbury's "science fiction" stories, the science fictional element is rather small. Bradbury gives you something that is clearly science fiction but the story itself is about people and relationships and love. This is a sweet story about how a family deals with the death of mother and wife to a young family. There are four other stories (including the title story) as well as a short "screen treatment" at the end (which is nothing remarkable, just interesting). The unified theme of these stories is robots which are very human-like in attitude and behavior, if not appearance.

As a bit of trivia, "I sing the body electric" was first written as a TV episode for tv series "Twilight Zone" and is apparently the only thing written by Bradbury that was used in the original series.

This book was a special edition put together to collect Bradbury's robot stories. There are some nice but small illustrations for each story plus a large watercolor on the inside that I believe was done by Bradbury. ( )
  RBeffa | Oct 14, 2015 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

In five stories (one of them original to this collection, plus a rare, previously unpublished screen treatment) Bradbury explores the concept of Robotics and examines its impact on the day-to-day lives of ordinary people.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.72)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,768,150 books! | Top bar: Always visible