HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly
Loading...

Revolution (edition 2010)

by Jennifer Donnelly

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2541506,314 (4.14)179
Member:nlanthierl
Title:Revolution
Authors:Jennifer Donnelly
Info:Delacorte Books for Young Readers (2010), Kindle Edition, 498 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:historical fiction, French revolution, teenage depression

Work details

Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly

Recently added byDisneyDiva86, sshartelg, bejhawk, Mirandalg14, kjames29, private library, MaggyFarrell
  1. 01
    Radiant Days by Elizabeth Hand (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  2. 01
    Hunger's Brides: A Novel of the Baroque by Paul Anderson (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Modern girl Beulah studies the life of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 17th century Mexican poet.
  3. 01
    Some Girls Are by Courtney Summers (SunnySD)
    SunnySD: Grief, angst, coping with personal tragedy and relationships - strong female protagonists.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 179 mentions

English (148)  Italian (1)  French (1)  All languages (150)
Showing 1-5 of 148 (next | show all)
4.5 stars. Enjoyed the story, although the main part happens in the last 50 pages or so. Also learned a lot about music history and the French Revolution. ( )
  Mirandalg14 | Aug 18, 2014 |
Another book about spoiled rich kids going to a swanky school in New York City? Lord help me! These young people are so soulless that they gather each morning before school to get themselves chemically enhanced in order to get through the day. And it doesn't help that the protagonist, Andi, is not only spoiled, with a falling apart family, she's also depressed and basically unlikable. Her only redeeming feature is that she plays a mean guitar. I was about to set Revolution aside, but the beauty of A Northern Light kept niggling at me. Okay, I'd give it one more chapter--and it just happened to be the chapter where Andi agrees to go with her father to Paris for winter vacation. They are staying with friends of the family who live in a warehouse in Paris, which G plans to turn into a museum of the French Revolution. Boxes of Revolutionary artifacts are everywhere! G hands Andi a guitar circa 1795, and tucked into a secret compartment in the guitar's case, she finds a diary written in 1795 by Alexandrine Paradis, a lower class girl who has developed a relationship with the Royal family. I won't go into spoiler territory here, but will just say that my interest--and the book's pace--picked up dramatically at this point. In the end, this was a fascinating look at life during Revolutionary times, with a healthy dose of music, both pop and classical. Give it a chance, and don't be put off by the slow start! ( )
  alexann | Jun 3, 2014 |
I really wanted to like this book (either the way I liked A Northern Light or the way I liked The Tea Rose), but it fell almost completely flat to me, I think because of the modern setting. What in her historical stories felt dramatic and larger-than-life here felt melodramatic and... almost cynical. Andi's personality never seemed authentic to me, and the historical narrative never did, either. (It didn't help that one of the historical figures around whom the story revolves was made up.) (Also, tangentially, who makes up an antidepressant?!) Unsatisfying. ( )
  ellen.w | Jun 1, 2014 |
I really wanted to like this book (either the way I liked A Northern Light or the way I liked The Tea Rose), but it fell almost completely flat to me, I think because of the modern setting. What in her historical stories felt dramatic and larger-than-life here felt melodramatic and... almost cynical. Andi's personality never seemed authentic to me, and the historical narrative never did, either. (It didn't help that one of the historical figures around whom the story revolves was made up.) (Also, tangentially, who makes up an antidepressant?!) Unsatisfying. ( )
  ellen.w | Jun 1, 2014 |
”I am not afraid of beatings or blood anymore. I’m not afraid of guards or guillotines.
There is only one thing I fear now - love.
For I have seen it and I have felt it and I know that it is love, not death, that undoes us.”

Holy shit. What did I just read?

Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly goes right up there with novels like I Am the Messenger, A Northern Light (also written by her), and Jellicoe Road. And trust me, I do not honor any book with s prestigious a rank as this.

I really do not know how I will find the words to describe my endless love for this brilliantly constructed novel, so I will make a list to organize my thoughts - similar to what I did with my review of [b:On the Jellicoe Road|1162022|On the Jellicoe Road|Melina Marchetta|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1212708945s/1162022.jpg|6479100].

But first, a bit about the book. The story follows Andi - a music-genius-depression-addled girl, dealing with grief brought on by the death of her younger brother, Truman. Her dad pays little attention to her, or so it seems, and her mother is on the verge of insanity - her paintings the only tether she has. Needless to say, her life kind of sucks.

(Fear not, this is not a woe-is-me, plea for sympathy kind of novel. It is much more than that.)

In the midst of all this shit, her father decides to embark on a trip to France with Andi. There, she meets a talented rapper (I promise it’s not insta-love!) and a girl named Alexandrine “The Green Man.” I will go no further so as to not spoil the novel.

Revolution pretty much has everything I love packed in a 500-page volume. And I enjoyed every damn second of it.

So, here are 7 Reasons You Should Read Revolution, by Jennifer Donnelly:

1. THE HISTORY.

Very well researched, which equals a happy Summer. When it comes to history, I am a full-fledged dork. Obviously.

This is more than a recount of the French Rev; no, it is much more personal than that. We are plopped smack in the middle of the streets of Paris alongside Alexandrine, an ambitious actress. There are multiple appearances by many influential historical figures, which I’m sure will make any history lover giddy.

Not to spoil anything, but my previous views of the Royalists and the Revolutionaries (particularly the Jacobins) have been blurred.

2. THE CHARACTERS.

Nathan, Virgil, G., Lilli, Vijay - all characters I absolutely adore. Did I already say Donnelly has mastered the art of character development? This is also true for her previous YA novel, A Northern Light.

And I don’t think I’ll ever forget the protagonist, Andi, anytime soon. At first I thought she was an insufferable bitch, but within a few pages my perception of her was completely flipped. She became my best friend; I felt as if I was right next to her, experiencing her experiences and feeling her emotions, and my love for her grew by the page.

I’m a bit annoyed, though, by the mostly male cast of characters, but I’m able to let it slide.

3. THE FEELS & WRITING.
”I don’t like hope very much. In fact, I hate it. It’s the crystal meth of emotions. It hooks you fast and kills you hard. It’s bad news. The worst. It’s sharp sticks and cherry bombs. When hope shows up, it’s only a matter of time until someone gets hurt.”
Counting how many times I full-on almost cried in Revolution would be pointless. Whether it was about Louis Charles or Truman or even music I found myself tearing up. I haven’t been this emotionally affected since, well, last year.

The writing was impeccable, typical Donnelly. I can still hear Andi’s voice in my head; the author has just captured the protagonist’s voice that well.

(Side note: This is the third book I've given 5 stars this year. Yup, it’s that good.)

4. THE DOSE OF CONTEMPORARY. Pun intended.

If you’re more of a contemporary type of gal/guy, do not worry. Revolution
Actually, very normal topics are brought in alongside the grim ones. Andi is just trying to survive her senior year of high school, and at the start of the novel, she is failing all her classes, despite her history of straight-As. As you can tell, this isn’t a full-on historical fiction novel; it’s quite eclectic.

5. THE MUSIC.

I’m not much of a musician, but I do thoroughly enjoy music. Virgil’s rap scenes were some of my favorites, and envisioning him rapping on stage made him 10x hotter. Sad truth: I sometimes skim and at times entirely skip poem and lyric segments in a book; this was not the case in Revolution. Furthermore, some of the most beautiful descriptions in this novel were of music and Andi’s intense love for it. Being the total n00b I am, I Googled “Malherbeau,” thinking he was some obscure musician. Apparently, he’s not real. *sad face*

6. THE ADVENTURE. (read: TIME TRAVEL OMG)

Again, I won’t expand on this much because I don’t want to ruin it for those who haven’t read this. But, I’ll just say that there is a ton of fireworks and sneaking and other fun stuff.

7. THE SCIENCE.

If you’re neither a contemporary nor a history buff, there is plenty of science, particularly genetics and DNA. It was quite fascinating when Andi’s dad was talking about the methods they used to uncover the mystery of Louis-Charles. The debate of Science vs. History was intriguing, and I don’t think I need to explicitly say which side I supported.

Donnelly provides an alternate view to the French Revolution - one that is both thought-provoking and downright brilliant. An intricate story that has permanently found its spot on my favorites list. ( )
  Summer_Missfictional | May 23, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 148 (next | show all)
This is a great example of young adult fiction: beautifully written and thoroughly researched yet not, to borrow Patrick Ness's phrase, "an adjective novel". There is an emotional vividness and a delight in story that will speak strongly to teenagers. I hope Donnelly returns to the genre a little sooner next time.
 
BROOKLYN: Andi Alpers is on the edge. She’s angry at her father for leaving, angry at her mother for not being able to cope, and heartbroken by the loss of her younger brother, Truman. Rage and grief are destroying her. And she’s about to be expelled from Brooklyn Heights’ most prestigious private school when her father intervenes. Now Andi must accompany him to Paris for winter break.

PARIS: Alexandrine Paradis lived over two centuries ago. She dreamed of making her mark on the Paris stage, but a fateful encounter with a doomed prince of France cast her in a tragic role she didn’t want—and couldn’t escape.

Two girls, two centuries apart. One never knowing the other. But when Andi finds Alexandrine’s diary, there’s comfort and distraction for Andi in the journal’s antique pages—until, on a midnight journey through the catacombs of Paris, Alexandrine’s words transcend paper and time, and the past becomes suddenly, terrifyingly present.

Jennifer Donnellyartfully weaves two girls’ stories into one unforgettable account of life, loss, and enduring love.
added by kthomp25 | editsummary
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jennifer Donnellyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bering, EmmaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Card, Emily JaniceNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
I found myself within a forest dark,

For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

Ah me! How hard a thing it is to say,

What was this forest savage, rough, and stern,

Which in the very thought renews the fear.

So bitter is it, death is little more...

- Dante

The Divine Comedy
Dedication
For Daisy,

who kicked out the walls of my heart
First words
Those who can, do.

Those who can't, deejay.
Quotations
"History is a Rorschach test, people," she said. "What you see when you look at it is tells you as much about yourself as it does about the past."
Lights blink all around me for the gods of the holidays. Green and red for Santa. Blue for Judah Maccabee. White for Martha Stewart.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
An angry, grieving seventeen-year-old musician facing expulsion from her prestigious Brooklyn private school travels to Paris to complete a school assignment and uncovers a diary written during the French revolution by a young actress attempting to help a tortured, imprisoned little boy--Louis Charles, the lost king of France.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0385737637, Hardcover)

Amazon Best Books of the Month, October 2010: Revolution, Jennifer Donnelly's remarkable new novel, weaves together the lives of Andi Alpers, a depressed modern-day teenager, and Alexandrine Paradis, a brave young woman caught up in the French Revolution. While in Paris with her estranged father, a Nobel geneticist hired to match the DNA of a heart said to belong to the last dauphin of France, Andi discovers a diary hidden within a guitar case--and so begins the story of Alexandrine, who herself had close ties to the dauphin. Redemption and the will to change are powerful themes of the novel, and music is ever present--Andi and Alex have a passion for the guitar, and the playlist running through Revolution is a who's who of classic and contemporary influences. Danger, intrigue, music, and impeccably researched history fill the pages of Revolution, as both young women learn that, "it is love, not death, that undoes us."--Seira Wilson

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:44:17 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

An angry, grieving seventeen-year-old musician facing expulsion from her prestigious Brooklyn private school travels to Paris to complete a school assignment and uncovers a diary written during the French revolution by a young actress attempting to help a tortured, imprisoned little boy--Louis Charles, the lost king of France.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
4 avail.
339 wanted
3 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.14)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 11
2.5 8
3 48
3.5 29
4 139
4.5 41
5 144

Audible.com

Two editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,246,527 books! | Top bar: Always visible