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The Giver Quartet 01 - The Giver by Lois…
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The Giver Quartet 01 - The Giver (original 1993; edition 2006)

by Lois Lowry

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
24,214116845 (4.19)575
Member:drachenbraut23
Title:The Giver Quartet 01 - The Giver
Authors:Lois Lowry
Info:Delacorte Press Books for Young Readers (2006), Edition: Reissue, Paperback, 179 pages
Collections:Your library, 2012
Rating:****1/2
Tags:YA, Post-Apocalyptic/Dystopian

Work details

The Giver by Lois Lowry (1993)

  1. 233
    1984 by George Orwell (cflorente)
  2. 181
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (writecathy)
  3. 192
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (cflorente)
  4. 171
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (chrisharpe, afyfe)
    chrisharpe: I see I am in a minority but, although the idea behind the book is a good one, The Giver struck me as quite clumsy. A much more effective exploration of similar themes is Huxley's "Brave New World".
  5. 140
    The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau (FFortuna)
    FFortuna: The Giver is much darker, but are similar in premise.
  6. 176
    Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt (_Zoe_)
    _Zoe_: Another children's book that manages both to entertain and to make you think. These are two of my favourites.
  7. 100
    Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins (jessicastatzer)
  8. 100
    Uglies by Scott Westerfeld (KamTonnes)
    KamTonnes: Uglies and The Giver both portray societies that limit conflict by having very specific rules, roles, and expectations for everyone. Also, in both stories, the main characters slowly start to question the values of their respective communities.
  9. 51
    Matched by Ally Condie (Trojanprincess)
    Trojanprincess: The two worlds seem similar in the way that every aspect of their livee are controlled.
  10. 40
    We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (chrisharpe)
    chrisharpe: Similar themes, We is a lot better written.
  11. 30
    The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer (jbarry)
    jbarry: futuristic take on biomedical ethics and mindbendingly complicated relationships
  12. 30
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (mcenroeucsb)
  13. 42
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (ubcsfs)
  14. 20
    This Perfect Day by Ira Levin (sturlington)
  15. 10
    The Unnameables by Ellen Booraem (Nikkles)
  16. 10
    Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (rhondagrantham)
  17. 10
    The Dubious Hills by Pamela Dean (infiniteletters)
  18. 00
    Among the Hidden by Margaret Peterson Haddix (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: In these riveting, suspenseful and thought-provoking dystopian novels, 12-year-old boys learn from inspirational figures about the true nature of their repressive societies: Jonas, from the elderly Giver; Luke, from another hidden -- albeit, more privileged and knowledgeable -- "third child."… (more)
  19. 00
    The Other Side of the Island by Allegra Goodman (foggidawn)
  20. 11
    The Story Box by Monica Hughes (infiniteletters)

(see all 26 recommendations)

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» See also 575 mentions

English (1,158)  Italian (3)  German (2)  Portuguese (1)  French (1)  English (Middle) (1)  All languages (1,166)
Showing 1-5 of 1158 (next | show all)
Esta historia se siente extrañamente inconclusa. La idea en la que se basa me parece muy interesante, pero no está bien desarrollada. Es demasiado simplista.

Hay un mundo donde nadie ve los colores, escucha música ni tiene sentimientos; y en ningún momento hay ni siquiera una referencia a como sucede eso. Lo de la música es fácil, se prohíbe y listo, pero ¿cómo lograron que nadie viera los colores, que nadie sintiera?

Y la falta de desarrollo no se limita a eso. Hay muchas otras cosas que merecían una explicación y no la tienen. ¿Qué pasó con la gente de color, los mataron a todos? Si se supone que Asher no tiene sentimientos ¿por qué es tan obvio que siente envidia de Jonas, acaso la envidia no es un sentimiento? Si sólo seleccionan mujeres Paridoras y nunca seleccionan a ningún hombre para el cargo de embarazarlas, ¿eso significa que todos los embarazos son por inseminación artificial, y si es así de dónde sacan el semen?

El final es demasiado brusco. En un momento le está pasando un recuerdo y al minuto siguiente ya tienen un "ingenioso plan". Además, perdónenme si no me creí en ningún momento que el plan fuera para transformar a la comunidad, parece simplemente como como si el antiguo Dador tuviera las ansias de sentirse necesitado. Y esa escena final con Jonas y Gabriel bajando en trineo hacía un mundo normal donde casualmente es Navidad. ¿QUÉ ES ESO? Les juró que no entendí. ¿Murieron? ¿O es real y es pura casualidad que lo del trineo y la Navidad sea exactamente igual a los recuerdos que le paso El Dador? Casi prefiero que la respuesta sea que mueren porque eso tendría más sentido que esa extraña "casualidad".

Vamos que pudimos habernos ahorrado todo el cuento del baño de los ancianos y haber dedicado esas páginas a darle un poco más de trasfondo a la trama.

De verdad estoy sorprendida como este libro llegó a formar parte de los clásicos contemporáneos americanos. ( )
  Glire | Jun 22, 2016 |
Didn't like it . . . ( )
  mtlkch | Jun 21, 2016 |
This book was recommended by DevourerofBooks on my blog, and I happened to hit the library that same night; I checked out "The Giver" and began reading it immediately. I was pleasantly surprised at the ease of Lowry's shift from the familiar (to me) world of Anastasia to this "utopia" where rules have been determined for every aspect of life to eliminate conflict and suffering. The cost, however, is that without those, the people who live in the Community cannot experience love or joy, either.[return]I can’t think of anyone who shouldn’t read this book; its simple prose, engaging characters, and intriguing plot have the pages flying by from the first, and I was intensely sad to reach the end. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
This book was recommended by DevourerofBooks on my blog, and I happened to hit the library that same night; I checked out "The Giver" and began reading it immediately. I was pleasantly surprised at the ease of Lowry's shift from the familiar (to me) world of Anastasia to this "utopia" where rules have been determined for every aspect of life to eliminate conflict and suffering. The cost, however, is that without those, the people who live in the Community cannot experience love or joy, either.[return]I can’t think of anyone who shouldn’t read this book; its simple prose, engaging characters, and intriguing plot have the pages flying by from the first, and I was intensely sad to reach the end. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
This book was recommended by DevourerofBooks on my blog, and I happened to hit the library that same night; I checked out "The Giver" and began reading it immediately. I was pleasantly surprised at the ease of Lowry's shift from the familiar (to me) world of Anastasia to this "utopia" where rules have been determined for every aspect of life to eliminate conflict and suffering. The cost, however, is that without those, the people who live in the Community cannot experience love or joy, either.[return]I can’t think of anyone who shouldn’t read this book; its simple prose, engaging characters, and intriguing plot have the pages flying by from the first, and I was intensely sad to reach the end. ( )
  kristi_test_04 | Jun 17, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 1158 (next | show all)
Despite occasional logical lapses, "The Giver," a powerful and provocative novel, is sure to keep older children reading. And thinking.
added by Aerrin99 | editNew York Times, Karen Ray (Oct 31, 1993)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lois Lowryprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ibatoulline, BagramIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rifkin, RonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
For all the children
To whom we entrust the future
First words
It was almost December, and Jonas was beginning to be frightened.
Quotations
His mind reeled. Now, empowered to ask questions of utmost rudeness- and promised answers- he could, conceivably (though it was almost unimaginable), ask someone, some adult, his father perhaps: "Do you lie?" But he had no way of knowing if the answer he received were true.
We really have to protect people from wrong choices.
But everyone would be burdened and pained. They don't want that. And that's the real reason The Receiver is so vital to them, and so honored. They selected me-- and you--to lift that burden from themselves.
Jonas did not want to go back. He didn't want the memories, didn't want the honor, didn't want the wisdom, didn't want the pain. He wanted his childhood again, his scraped knees and ball games.
Sometimes I wish they'd ask for my wisdom more often-there are so many things I could tell them; things I wish they would change. But they don't want change. Life here is so orderly, so predictable-so painless. It's what they've chosen.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
This book is about Jonah who is trying to figure out what memories are since he is the receiver and the giver is giving them to him. The story takes place in post-apocalyptic world (I'm assuming). Jonah has to come to terms with release and the very culture that he exists in. There is a trilogy for this series, and I'm excited to read them. This book can be used for character, theme, and other story elements in a class.
Haiku summary
A black and white world

One boy holds the memories

Of colorful past

(Sundancer)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0440237688, Mass Market Paperback)

In a world with no poverty, no crime, no sickness and no unemployment, and where every family is happy, 12-year-old Jonas is chosen to be the community's Receiver of Memories. Under the tutelage of the Elders and an old man known as the Giver, he discovers the disturbing truth about his utopian world and struggles against the weight of its hypocrisy. With echoes of Brave New World, in this 1994 Newbery Medal winner, Lowry examines the idea that people might freely choose to give up their humanity in order to create a more stable society. Gradually Jonas learns just how costly this ordered and pain-free society can be, and boldly decides he cannot pay the price.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:46 -0400)

(see all 11 descriptions)

Lowry's unforgettable tale introduces 12-year-old Jonas, who is singled out by the Community to be trained by The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of true pain and pleasure. Now it's time for Jonas to receiver the truth.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 13 descriptions

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