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Foundling (Monster Blood Tattoo, Book 1) by…
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Foundling (Monster Blood Tattoo, Book 1) (original 2006; edition 2007)

by D.M. Cornish

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928469,411 (3.96)69
Member:MsRybo5
Title:Foundling (Monster Blood Tattoo, Book 1)
Authors:D.M. Cornish
Info:Speak (2007), Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
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Foundling by D. M. Cornish (2006)

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English (45)  Swedish (1)  All languages (46)
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
If the entire series is as engaging as this first novel, it will be one I happily follow. Rossamund is a likable enough main character, but it is in the supporting cast and the creation of the Half-Continent that D.M. Cornish truly shines. Without too heavy a hand, the author weaves definitions, customs, and facts from this new world into the story, giving readers the opportunity to absorb the information rather than expecting us to recall slews of terms from the moment of their introduction. The comprehensive appendices provide supplementary insight to what is found in the book as well as a well-arranged glossary of terms, should one escape you during the telling of the tale. [return]The characters with whom Rossamund interacts, from the staff at the foundlingery where the story begins to the creatures he meets on his journey to the new folks we meet at the end who are bound to be important in book two of the series, are all brilliantly crafted and utterly lifelike. They propel the story effortlessly, providing Rossamund with ample opportunities for adventure.[return]The story has themes to appeal to juvenile and YA readers, but the writing is not simplified for such an audience. I highly recommend this book to youth at or above middle-school level; it may be somewhat challenging to younger readers, but the grammar, sentence structure, and vocabulary will set a beautiful example for early reader/writers. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
If the entire series is as engaging as this first novel, it will be one I happily follow. Rossamund is a likable enough main character, but it is in the supporting cast and the creation of the Half-Continent that D.M. Cornish truly shines. Without too heavy a hand, the author weaves definitions, customs, and facts from this new world into the story, giving readers the opportunity to absorb the information rather than expecting us to recall slews of terms from the moment of their introduction. The comprehensive appendices provide supplementary insight to what is found in the book as well as a well-arranged glossary of terms, should one escape you during the telling of the tale. [return]The characters with whom Rossamund interacts, from the staff at the foundlingery where the story begins to the creatures he meets on his journey to the new folks we meet at the end who are bound to be important in book two of the series, are all brilliantly crafted and utterly lifelike. They propel the story effortlessly, providing Rossamund with ample opportunities for adventure.[return]The story has themes to appeal to juvenile and YA readers, but the writing is not simplified for such an audience. I highly recommend this book to youth at or above middle-school level; it may be somewhat challenging to younger readers, but the grammar, sentence structure, and vocabulary will set a beautiful example for early reader/writers. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
If the entire series is as engaging as this first novel, it will be one I happily follow. Rossamund is a likable enough main character, but it is in the supporting cast and the creation of the Half-Continent that D.M. Cornish truly shines. Without too heavy a hand, the author weaves definitions, customs, and facts from this new world into the story, giving readers the opportunity to absorb the information rather than expecting us to recall slews of terms from the moment of their introduction. The comprehensive appendices provide supplementary insight to what is found in the book as well as a well-arranged glossary of terms, should one escape you during the telling of the tale. [return]The characters with whom Rossamund interacts, from the staff at the foundlingery where the story begins to the creatures he meets on his journey to the new folks we meet at the end who are bound to be important in book two of the series, are all brilliantly crafted and utterly lifelike. They propel the story effortlessly, providing Rossamund with ample opportunities for adventure.[return]The story has themes to appeal to juvenile and YA readers, but the writing is not simplified for such an audience. I highly recommend this book to youth at or above middle-school level; it may be somewhat challenging to younger readers, but the grammar, sentence structure, and vocabulary will set a beautiful example for early reader/writers. ( )
  kristi_test_04 | Jun 17, 2016 |
Rec. by LauraW for world-building. ?ŠCheck out all the appendices in the back - apparently they're about 1/3 the book.
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Well, not quite. ?áIt's still a longer book than expected. ?áAnd still odd, in so many ways. ?áSome of the writing is awkward: I almost gave up after, Birchet was a torture masquerading as a cure," because Birchet is a medicine and so the phrase is reversed. ?áBut I'm glad I didn't, because there was also some lovely writing. ?áAlso, some of the world-building was cliche, and some very original. ?áAlso, it took me two days to read this, despite the fact that it was easy enough to read and sufficiently engaging. ?áAlso, I'm glad I finished, but have no interest in reading the rest of the trilogy (especially because the titles of the next two books are spoilers). ?á I wonder if D.M. Cornish is a pen name for two writers, a la' Donny and Marie from Cornwall or something, as some parts & aspects of the book seem so much better than others. ?á

Well, anyway, to those who have read it, I respect your opinion whether you loved this or abandoned it with disgust. ?áAnd while I can't recommend it, I won't discourage those still considering it from trying it for themselves." ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
Yes, but Kindle. Unsure.
  Xleptodactylous | Apr 7, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
D. M. Cornishprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lindgren, NilleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Chapter 1:

foundling (noun) also wastrel. Stray people, usually children, found without a home or shelter on the streets of cities or even, amazingly, wandering exposed in the wilds. The usual destinations for such orphaned children are workhouses, mills, or the mines, although a fortunate few may find their way to a foundlingery. Such a place can care for a small number of foundlings and wastrels, fitting them for a more productive life and sparing them the agonies of harder labor.
Dedication
For Will and Mandii,
who were the first to believe
First words
Rossam√ľnd was a boy with a girl's name.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Rossam√ľnd, a young boy with a girl‚Äôs name, has never known his parents, and has lived his entire life at Madame Opera‚Äôs Estimable Marine Society for Foundling Boys and Girls, shielded from the horrors of the outside world. When he comes of age, however, a mysterious leer named Mr Sebastipole offers him a job as a lamplighter along the monster-fraught Wormway, far to the south. With his trusty almanac to guide him, Rossam√ľnd must journey to High Vesting in the state of Brandenbrass, down the black waters of the Humour river, led by mysterious and sinister companions that are more often foe than friend. The outside world is a terrible, dangerous place for a young Foundling boy.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142409138, Paperback)

Meet Rossam√ľnd?a foundling, a boy with a girl?s name who is about to begin a dangerous life in the service of the Emperor of the Half-Continent. What starts as a simple journey becomes a dangerous and complicated set of battles and decisions. Humans, monsters, unearthly creatures . . . who among these can Rossam√ľnd trust? D. M. Cornish has created an entirely original world, grounded in his own deft, classically influenced illustrations. Foundling is a magic-laced, Dickensian adventure that will transport the reader.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:44 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Having grown up in a home for foundlings and possessing a girl's name, Rossam√ľnd sets out to report to his new job as a lamplighter and has several adventures along the way as he meets people and monsters who are more complicated that he previously thought.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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