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Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent…
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Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular… (edition 2010)

by Timothy M. Dale

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Member:KentuckyPress
Title:Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture
Authors:Timothy M. Dale
Info:The University Press of Kentucky (2010), Hardcover, 328 pages
Collections:Your library
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Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture by Timothy M. Dale

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I got this because it has an intro by Kate Mulgrew, who wrote about being asked to speak in front of actual female scientists and how she apologized to them for not being a real scientist, but then found that many of them thought of her as an inspiring figure. Unfortunately, most of the book’s essays about different popular (and some not-so-popular) media just offer the author’s own interpretations of their potentially disruptive meanings, without much acknowledgement that the genius of popular culture is its openness to multiple and often conflicting interpretations. Archie Bunker was a hero to some and a figure of fun to others, all of them convinced that the producers shared their interpretations. Moreover, the introduction excuses itself from analyzing conservative/reactionary offerings (or interpretations) by claiming that its key texts came from 2000-2006, when conservative politics prevailed, and that protest and dissent are progressive by their nature. I don’t think conservatives would agree they were winning the culture war at that time, and I definitely don’t agree with the latter claim—look at GamerGate. An individual’s own reading of a text can be really interesting and insightful, but it can also lead to narrowing assumptions; when one author claims that “[c]learly, the act of buying a shirt is not always simply buying a shirt,” it’s just an assertion that progressive reforms can be accomplished through consumerist means, and I don’t know why I should believe that over Naomi Klein’s critique of same. Likewise, the essay about the Simpsons finds satire in episodes that, the author admits, others saw as reaffirming Christianity, and then attributes his own reading to the producers, insisting on the singularity of meaning. ( )
  rivkat | Dec 5, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0813125804, Hardcover)

The Simpsons questions what is culturally acceptable, showcasing controversial issues like homosexuality, animal rights, the war on terror, and religion. This subtle form of political analysis is effective in changing opinions and attitudes on a large scale. Homer Simpson Marches on Washington explores the transformative power that enables popular culture to influence political agendas, frame the consciousness of audiences, and create profound shifts in values and ideals.

To investigate the full spectrum of popular culture in a democratic society, editors Timothy M. Dale and Joseph J. Foy gather a top-notch team of scholars who use television shows such as Star Trek, The X-Files, All in the Family, The View, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and The Colbert Report, as well as movies and popular music, to investigate contemporary issues in American popular culture.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:48 -0400)

The Simpsons questions what is culturally acceptable, showcasing controversial issues like homosexuality, animal rights, the war on terror, and religion. This subtle form of political analysis is effective in changing opinions and attitudes on a large scale. Homer Simpson Marches on Washington explores the transformative power that enables popular culture to influence political agendas, frame the consciousness of audiences, and create profound shifts in values and ideals.To investigate the full spectrum of popular culture in a democratic society, editors Timothy M. Dale and Joseph J. Foy gathe… (more)

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