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What thou wilt: Traditional and Innovative trends in Post-Gardnerian…

by Jon Hanna

Other authors: Barbara Lee (Foreword)

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182910,233 (4)None
The publication from 1954 of Gerald Gardner's non-fiction works on witchcraft has led to the current public existence of two different trends of religious and magical belief and practice, both which identify themselves as "Wicca". One form places a strong emphasis upon the transmission of traditional practices and a form of initiatory lineage similar to that practised by Gardner himself. The other covers a wider range of views on each of these aspects, but with the most common position being a strong distance between the traditional practices-giving a greater importance to innovation-and a complete or near-complete abandon-ment of the concept of initiatory lineage. Both trends often see themselves and each other as being within a wider religio-magical stream of Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft of which the innovative form is a larger part, though in different ways. The traditional view of the innovative form typically labels that form "Eclectic" even in cases where the practitioners would understand "Eclectic" differently, and considers it to be something outside of what it terms "Wicca". The innovative form generally labels all Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft, or beyond, as "Wicca", and as such recognizes all traditional practitioners as Wiccan but does not generally make more signi-fi-cant distinctions between the various schools. The traditional stream considers the differences between the two streams as significant to the point of typicality while the innovative stream considers the differences as much less important. This book examines the differences and offers insights into both.… (more)

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It would be easy to dismiss this work as yet another rehash of the real Witches vs. the wananbes arguments that have been fought for several decades now. However I think Hanna has some interesting comments and insights. I found interest in the chapters on the Anti-Fluffy backlash, and the consideration of whether Wicca is a nature or fertility religion, and what that means, Te section of the politicization of the craft covers a great deal of territory, including an analysis of the feminist histories and the concepts and practices of those who see the Craft as an environmentalist religion. In short, there is a great deal of material for discussion and thought in this work. ( )
  ritaer | May 27, 2018 |
An excellently reasoned viewpoint with a lot of good information on Wicca and it's offshoots. ( )
  EvaElisabeth | Mar 6, 2015 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jon Hannaprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lee, BarbaraForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The publication from 1954 of Gerald Gardner's non-fiction works on witchcraft has led to the current public existence of two different trends of religious and magical belief and practice, both which identify themselves as "Wicca". One form places a strong emphasis upon the transmission of traditional practices and a form of initiatory lineage similar to that practised by Gardner himself. The other covers a wider range of views on each of these aspects, but with the most common position being a strong distance between the traditional practices-giving a greater importance to innovation-and a complete or near-complete abandon-ment of the concept of initiatory lineage. Both trends often see themselves and each other as being within a wider religio-magical stream of Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft of which the innovative form is a larger part, though in different ways. The traditional view of the innovative form typically labels that form "Eclectic" even in cases where the practitioners would understand "Eclectic" differently, and considers it to be something outside of what it terms "Wicca". The innovative form generally labels all Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft, or beyond, as "Wicca", and as such recognizes all traditional practitioners as Wiccan but does not generally make more signi-fi-cant distinctions between the various schools. The traditional stream considers the differences between the two streams as significant to the point of typicality while the innovative stream considers the differences as much less important. This book examines the differences and offers insights into both.

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