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The Gospel According to the Son by Norman…
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The Gospel According to the Son (original 1997; edition 1998)

by Norman Mailer

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604816,187 (3.16)14
Member:dylanwolf
Title:The Gospel According to the Son
Authors:Norman Mailer
Info:Abacus (1998), Paperback
Collections:KEN - NAI
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Tags:USA, tbr

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The Gospel According to the son by Norman Mailer (1997)

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» See also 14 mentions

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Very interesting fictional memoir of Jesus of Nazareth. The narrator's voice is highly believable as he undertakes a mission he's not sure he's up to. ( )
  dickmanikowski | Jun 26, 2012 |
At the very least, Mailer should have done a little research. A cardboard Jesus in what is usually an empty setting. The few details don't fit. (An altar in a synagogue!) ( )
1 vote MarthaJeanne | Jan 25, 2011 |
Gospel retellings from Jesus' point of view have already been done, and done better than this. I was really disappointed with The Gospel According to the Son, because it doesn't deviate *enough* from its source; Mailer never does anything interesting with all of its possibilities. There are even places, both in the dialogue and prose, where the novel follows the gospel story word for word. Bad form, Norman Mailer. A bad book and a disappointment that I really wanted to like. ( )
1 vote the_awesome_opossum | Jun 24, 2009 |
Mailer does an outstanding job of telling the story of the New Testament from the point of view of Jesus. The description of Christ's encounter with Satan in the wilderness is absolutely riveting. I would highly recommend this book to those who wish to understand the basics of Christianity as I would recommend Siddhartha to those who wish to understand the basics of Buddhism. ( )
  griggit | Jun 30, 2008 |
This is the gospel according to Jesus's own perspective. It was interesting and I found it uplifting, even though I am not a religious person. I found the perspective attributed to Jesus was credible.

While I enjoyed reading this, it left me wanting more. It was sparsely written and didn't go into Jesus's feelings in much depth. ( )
  LynnB | Nov 20, 2007 |
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With few exceptions, even the most conservative Christian should find little to reject. In a writer of Mr. Mailer's past daring and outrage, however, such a humility of imagination constitutes his Gospel's most disappointing aspect. In his faithfulness to tradition -- a faithfulness that even leads him to a puzzling reliance on the archaic King James diction of a thousand Christmas and Easter pageants -- Mr. Mailer has barred himself from the kinds of penetrating meditation, risky invention and plunging insight that have always been his strongest gifts and that might have inspired less gifted searchers in the hunt for a possible Jesus.
 
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679457836, Hardcover)

In the two millennia since Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John wrote their separate biographies of Jesus, only a handful of other authors have attempted renditions--Charles Dickens, Leo Tolstoy, and D. H. Lawrence have tried their hands at it; scholars E. P. Sanders and Raymond Brown have produced academic treatises on the historical Jesus. Perhaps the best-known fictional account of the life of Jesus is Nikos Kazantzakis's The Last Temptation of Christ, which explores the Son of Man's all-too-human side. Norman Mailer joins these ranks with The Gospel According to the Son.

Not content to chronicle Jesus' life in the form of an apocryphal gospel, Mailer has the chutzpah to crawl inside his title character's head and tell the story from the first-person point of view. Here we get the Prince of Peace's personal account of his temptation by Satan, his three-year ministry, and his agony on the cross. Mailer presents an entirely new kind of passion play, one that remains faithful to the shape of Jesus' life as outlined in the gospels, while daring to imagine the inner life of this most elusive historical figure.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:34:14 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The autobiography of Jesus Christ, written by him after his ascension into heaven. The novel opens with his youth as a carpenter, gives his reaction to God's announcement of his mission to save mankind, and describes the terror of the crucifixion. Christ analyzes his two sides--the divine and the human--and recalls his debates with the devil.… (more)

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