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You Are Your Own Gym: The Bible of…
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You Are Your Own Gym: The Bible of Bodyweight Exercises (2010)

by Mark Lauren, Joshua Clark

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188862,829 (3.76)2
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    Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy (caimanjosh)
    caimanjosh: Both probably about the best bodyweight training books you'll find. I think Bret's knowledge of strength training is probably better, but Mark Lauren's book is more comprehensive and complete. You can't go wrong with either.
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I read the text, it explained things fairly straight-forward. I'm not sure the author's preference for body-weight exercises was fully explained, but it didn't reek of pseudo-science or anecdata as a lot of this kind of book do.

The book itself is much more of a reference work, since the real value is in the index of exercises and the program that builds individual exercises into sets and builds weeks of this into a long-term plan. ( )
  nnschiller | Sep 18, 2014 |
A few caveats before I say anything about this book: I am not a fitness guy. I'm not in great shape and I don't exercise daily. But I have gone through a number of periods where I've managed to go from rather poor shape to pretty decent shape through a bit of hard work (okay, sometimes a lot more than a "bit"). I've tried a good number of approaches and found some I like and a lot that I don't like.

Having said all that, my one long time consistent preference has been for simplicity and lack of overhead (whether gym membership costs, equipment or whatever). Given that, I've always had a strong preference for bodyweight exercises and have occasionally sought out any decent books on the matter. Up until recently, the best I had seen were usually of the boot-camp workout variety, though I had seen a few decent looking, older books on calisthenics (it seems like such a dated term lately).

So, when I passed by this on the new arrivals shelf at the library, I grabbed it, flipped through it a bit and was immediately interested. Within a couple days, I went and got my own copy. The main reason for this is that it covers a lot of bodyweight exercises I had never seen before. It even gave me a few new ideas and variations for some I already knew fairly well.

The unfortunate side is this: as with nearly every other exercise book I've ever picked up (at least in the last couple of decades), the writing and style of presentation are terribly. It's clearly designed to sell to a specific audience. And unfortunately, I can't say it's an audience I'd ever want to claim to be part of.

But still, if you like bodyweight exercises -- and you really should, if you have any interest in staying or getting in shape -- you should pick this up and see if it teaches you anything new. ( )
  tlockney | Sep 7, 2014 |
Contained is some very effective routines to keep your workout going at home, the office, or anywhere without the need for regular equipment. ( )
  capiam1234 | Aug 14, 2013 |
Contained is some very effective routines to keep your workout going at home, the office, or anywhere without the need for regular equipment. ( )
  smcamp1234 | Aug 14, 2013 |
Although I still prefer lifting weights in most cases (over bodyweight exercises), the author here does make some good points out bodyweight exercises. They are, of course, always available -- good when you're traveling -- and tend to be excellent in terms of improving functional movement and core fitness. (That said, free weights allow for much easier progression, which is absolutely key to improving strength and building muscle.) The list of exercises is impressive, and I plan to try some of these out the next time I'm away from a gym and want to get some workouts in. The author's knowledge of the concepts of progression, periodization, and strength training is clear. Probably the best bodyweight exercise book I'm aware of. Recommended if you would like to make use of bodyweight exercises to improve or maintain fitness. ( )
1 vote caimanjosh | May 28, 2013 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mark Laurenprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clark, Joshuamain authorall editionsconfirmed
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In Memory of
Major William “Brian” Downs
Captain Jeremy J. Fresques “FS”
Captain Derek M. Argel “AL”
&
Staff Sergeant Casey J. Crate “CE”
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I want you to understand, unlike many other fitness authors, I do not train movie stars, television celebrities, models, or other personalities whose livelihoods hinge on being fit.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345528581, Paperback)

From an elite Special Operations physical trainer, an ingeniously simple, rapid-results, do-anywhere program for getting into amazing shape.

As the demand for Special Operations military forces has grown over the last decade, elite trainer Mark Lauren has been at the front lines of preparing nearly one thousand soldiers, getting them lean and strong in record time. Now, for regular Joes and Janes, he shares the secret to his amazingly effective regimen—simple exercises that require nothing more than the resistance of your own bodyweight to help you reach the pinnacle of fitness and look better than ever before.

Armed with Mark Lauren’s motivation techniques, expert training, and nutrition advice, you’ll see rapid results by working out just thirty minutes a day, four times a week—whether in your living room, yard, garage, hotel room, or office. Lauren’s exercises build more metabolism-enhancing muscle than weightlifting, burn more fat than aerobics, and are safer than both, since bodyweight exercises develop balance and stability and therefore help prevent injuries. Choose your workout level—Basic, 1st Class, Master Class,and Chief Class—and get started, following the clear instructions for 125 exercises that work every muscle from your neck to your ankles. Forget about gym memberships, free weights, and infomercial contraptions. They are all poor substitutes for the world’s most advanced fitness machine, the one thing you are never without: your own body.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:21:52 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Presents a training guide to improving muscle strength and overall appearance, providing instructions for 125 exercises geared toward varying levels of fitness, and requiring only the resistance of one's own bodyweight.

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