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16+ Works 2,638 Members 29 Reviews 4 Favorited

About the Author

Herbert Asbury (1891-1963) was a prolific journalist and editor

Includes the names: Herbert Asbury, Herbert Ashbury

Image credit: drawing by Frances Carle at Herbert Asbury.com

Works by Herbert Asbury

Associated Works

The Aspirin Age, 1919-1941 (1949) — Contributor — 129 copies
How to Mix Drinks or, the Bon-Vivant's Companion (1862) — Introduction — 126 copies
Desert Island Decameron (1945) — Contributor — 57 copies
The Bedside Tales: A Gay Collection (1945) — Contributor — 46 copies
NYPD: Stories of Survival from the World's Toughest Beat (2002) — Contributor — 18 copies
The Fine Art of Robbery (1966) 6 copies
Stories of Scarlet Women (1962) — Contributor — 5 copies
Famosos casos de estafa y pillaje (1977) — Contributor — 5 copies
The Bathroom Reader (1946) — Contributor — 3 copies

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Canonical name
Asbury, Herbert
Birthdate
1889-09-01
Date of death
1963-02-24
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Birthplace
Farmington, Missouri, USA
Place of death
New York, New York, USA
Places of residence
New York, New York, USA
Canada Lake, New York, USA
Education
Carleton College, Farmington
Baptist College, Farmington
Occupations
journalist
Organizations
Southern Methodist church
Short biography
Herbert Asbury (September 1, 1889 – February 24, 1963) was an American journalist and writer who is best known for his true crime books detailing crime during the 19th and early 20th century such as Gem of the Prairie: An Informal History of the Chicago Underworld, The Barbary Coast: An Informal History of the San Francisco Underworld and The Gangs of New York. The Gangs of New York was later adapted for film as Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York (2002).

Members

Reviews

Really needs an overall narrative or sociological argument/insight to tie everything together. As it is, a series of repetitive anecdotes with very few having the sort of interesting detail to make them stand out.
 
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audient_void | 15 other reviews | Jan 6, 2024 |
I love to read about the squalid splendor of old New York, of the Five Points, the Bowery, of its sexology and night life. Alas and alack, those topics left their cards but didn't stay in this account of gangland during a century ending about 1925. Concentrations here include street fighting, assassins, and turf wars, topics which are tangential at best to my reading interests. Further descent came from a chapter mostly devoted to the tools and techniques one might need to enter a bank vault and two longish chapters narrating the 1863 draft riots, an event which the author admits has almost no nexus with the gangs, save that many of the participants were members of gangs. The author occasionally deploys a tongue-in-cheek whimsy to good effect, but overall his style is competent but plodding.… (more)
½
 
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Big_Bang_Gorilla | 15 other reviews | Apr 28, 2023 |
A very cool history of the Five Points area of old New York City. Reekingly communal, desperately poor, nasty, brutish and short.
 
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FinallyJones | 15 other reviews | Nov 17, 2021 |
I'm not sure how accurate this history of early San Francisco is but it was an interesting read. As much a product of it's own time (written in the 1930s) as a history, there is plenty of language that not what we would say today and some attitudes that are jarring but you do get a sense of what the Barbary Coast must have been like and perhaps a bit of why San Francisco is the city it is today. I particularly like the preacher who said that roller-rinks were the "road to perdition." If only my skating today was that interesting,… (more)
 
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amyem58 | 5 other reviews | Nov 13, 2021 |

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Statistics

Works
16
Also by
11
Members
2,638
Popularity
#9,739
Rating
½ 3.5
Reviews
29
ISBNs
49
Languages
5
Favorited
4

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