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Disambiguation Notice

This page is for F. E. Smith (1st Earl of Birkenhead)
Please do not combine it with that of his son, Frederick Winston Furneaux Smith, (2nd Earl of Birkenhead)

F. E. Smith (1st Earl of Birkenhead) should not be confused with, or combined with, F. W. Smith (2nd Earl of Birkenhead). The first was a lawyer and cabinet minister, the second the biographer of Kipling.

The titles Lord Birkenhead and the Earl of Birkenhead can refer to three different men of the same family all named Frederick:
1. Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead (1872-1930) Lawyer, politician and close ally of Winston Churchill. His books are listed under Frederick Edwin Smith.
2. Frederick Winston Furneaux Smith, 2nd Earl of Birkenhead (1907-1975) Historian, who wrote, among others, biographies of Rudyard Kipling, Lord Halifax, and his father. His works are listed under Frederick Winston Smith.
3. Frederick Smith, 3rd Earl of Birkenhead (1936 - 1985) Wrote "The Amazon" and a biography of William Wilberforce. Listed under his pen name: Robin Furneaux.

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Short biography
Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead, GCSI, PC, KC (12 July 1872 – 30 September 1930), best known to history as F. E. Smith, was a British Conservative statesman and lawyer who attained high office in the early 20th century, most notably Lord Chancellor. He was a skilled orator, noted for his staunch opposition to Irish nationalism, his wit, pugnacious views, and hard living and drinking. He is perhaps best remembered today as Winston Churchill's greatest personal and political friend until Birkenhead's death [Wikipedia]
Disambiguation notice
This page is for F. E. Smith (1st Earl of Birkenhead)
Please do not combine it with that of his son, Frederick Winston Furneaux Smith, (2nd Earl of Birkenhead)

F. E. Smith (1st Earl of Birkenhead) should not be confused with, or combined with, F. W. Smith (2nd Earl of Birkenhead). The first was a lawyer and cabinet minister, the second the biographer of Kipling.

The titles Lord Birkenhead and the Earl of Birkenhead can refer to three different men of the same family all named Frederick:
1. Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead (1872-1930) Lawyer, politician and close ally of Winston Churchill. His books are listed under Frederick Edwin Smith.
2. Frederick Winston Furneaux Smith, 2nd Earl of Birkenhead (1907-1975) Historian, who wrote, among others, biographies of Rudyard Kipling, Lord Halifax, and his father. His works are listed under Frederick Winston Smith.
3. Frederick Smith, 3rd Earl of Birkenhead (1936 - 1985) Wrote "The Amazon" and a biography of William Wilberforce. Listed under his pen name: Robin Furneaux.

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