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4 Works 901 Members 30 Reviews

About the Author

Kelly Williams Brown is the New York Times bestselling author of Adulting: How to Become a Grown-Up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps, which has been translated into nine languages. Previously, she was a features reporter and an award-winning humor columnist for the Statesman Journal, a daily newspaper in show more Salem, Oregon, which is where she lives now with her dog, Eleanor, who may in fact be a Muppet. show less

Works by Kelly Williams Brown

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Birthdate
1984
Gender
female
Nationality
USA
Occupations
Journalist

Members

Reviews

If you can, the best way to consume this book, in my humble opinion, is in it's audio form. It is read by the author, and as a self-proclaimed Leo-red-head, she has that natural Leo star quality--it's more a performance than a reading.
It's not that I learned so much from this book (after all, I did read the Emily Post book (by a descendant, Penny?) cover to cover), but that it's clever and witty and sweet. My favorite part might be the moving Jessica Maxwell section about how to be the best hostess to house guests. Before you think I have dismissed this as just another version of Emily Post thought, there actually is new material here. The Post book that I read did NOT have a section on hosting one's lova (lover). There's a huge helping of Southern Charm mixed in and this is a voice and a style that won't soon be leaving my head. Good thing that's not a bad thing. My problem is, if it pops out of my mouth in her style, can I carry it off? (Not being twenty-something OR Southern) I mean, already "y'all" has found it's way into a text post.
Wish me luck.
P.S. Thanks "SheAin'tGotNoShoes"! It was your "Want-to-read" list that brought this one to my attention. :-)
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TraSea | 3 other reviews | Apr 29, 2024 |
I had heard this was a recommended book to read. I was intrigued. I will be 60 this year, so I wondered if there were a few things I had missed in life. Come to find out, there were several, and I truly wish this book had been given to me even before college. I think the more you know and understand about the unspoken rules of adulting, the happier and more productive your life will be. The author didn't just state very obvious things, either. She tackled the tough issues. I try to give most books a five star rating if they are interesting and provide something new for me to digest. However, I don't always necessarily 100 percent believe certain things she discussed. When it comes to topics such as faith, or how to date/couple, I am a Christian who believes the best and only advice is to put God first, and sex waits until after marriage. No, I did not make the perfect decision myself, but I can look back now and see that. Can you have a successful marriage going out of order? Sure, but it is a harder and more painful road, IMO, and you are taking a chance it won't work going out of order. Other than those kinds of topics, I almost always fully agreed with what the author had to say. Great gift to give to someone who is young and starting out in life. Or a refresher book for those of us who have grown old and set in our ways. And for the very immature, a wakeup call on how to DO better and BE better!… (more)
 
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doehlberg63 | 25 other reviews | Dec 2, 2023 |
Non-fiction and rather adorable. The kind of book that makes you smile, makes you make lists, make plans, makes you frown, makes you want to throw across the room and have temper tantrums about I Don't Have To Grow Up, You Can't Make Me, and it will still be quietly, patiently, wisely, waiting for you when you come back an hour or three days later, needing to know more and with your rebellious hold of your wildness once again under your thumb.

This is very likely the book I'm going to get several copies of and give out at Christmas this year.… (more)
 
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wanderlustlover | 25 other reviews | Dec 26, 2022 |
I’m here seeking advice from one of my peers about adulthood. Which is fair. I probably wouldn’t listen to an old rich white dude mansplain being an adult, which, he probably wouldn’t actually do, but instead tell me to stop whining and suck it up. But Kelly I can relate to. Her unique white female millennial problems are my white female millennial problems. Which is problematic.

This book is great for me. And other suburban-middle-class-raised millennial women. While there is a tremendous amount of helpful (and some less than helpful) general information in Adulting, ranging from relationships with other people to relationships with your houseplants, there’s an inherent bias that I’ve come to find exists in most of the self-help books that I’ve read. I pick up the ones that I do because either a, they’re funny, or b, the girl on the cover looks a bit like me.

Which leads me to my biggest theoretical question, is the pop-psychology style of self-improvement a luxury of the privileged? I’ve taken stock of the customers at the bookstore this past holiday season who have been asking for Girl Wash Your Face, the bestseller from Rachel Hollis, and I have discovered that they are mostly middle-aged, white, stay-at-home moms.

I’m not entirely sure of the answer to my question, but if you are really seeking to make a great change in your life, one that will require actual effort and perseverance and will have an outstandingly positive impact on your life, skip this book. If you’re a middle-class millennial woman who really just needs someone to tell her how to clean her kitchen like me, go for it. Knock yourself out. There’s some helpful bits.
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smorton11 | 25 other reviews | Oct 29, 2022 |

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Works
4
Members
901
Popularity
#28,454
Rating
½ 3.7
Reviews
30
ISBNs
20
Languages
1

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