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George S. Clason (1874–1957)

Author of The Richest Man in Babylon

25 Works 3,819 Members 53 Reviews 3 Favorited

About the Author

In the 1920's George S. Clason distributed pamphlets containing financial advice in the form of parables set in Babylon to many financial institutions. From there, his pamphlets were compiled and published in the book, The Richest Man in Babylon. (Bowker Author Biography)

Works by George S. Clason

The Richest Man in Babylon (1926) 3,777 copies, 53 reviews
Find Your Right Job (2007) 1 copy

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Canonical name
Clason, George S.
Legal name
Clason, George Samuel
Birthdate
1874-11-07
Date of death
1957-04-07
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Birthplace
Louisiana, Missouri, USA
Place of death
Napa, California, USA
Places of residence
Louisiana, Missiouri, USA (birth)
Napa, California, USA (death)
Occupations
soldier
businessman
writer
Short biography
Started two companies - the Clason Map Company of Denver Colorado and the Clason Publishing Company. Best known for, starting in 1926, writing a series of pamphlets about thrift and financial success.

Members

Reviews

Great book about personal finance associated with a fascinating narrative. Recommend to anyone who wants to start with personal budgeting!
 
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heolinhdam | 52 other reviews | Jun 25, 2024 |
Good book. It is also a quick read. However, much of the wisdom that he shares is already abundant and the challenge is not in what to do to but acquiring the discipline to do it. I only wish the conversational language was a little simpler.
 
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dhrona | 52 other reviews | Apr 15, 2024 |
In short this book is about...
1. Saving money and
2. Investing that money intelligently to make more money.
 
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Azmir_Fakir | 52 other reviews | Oct 31, 2022 |
This is THE book which I wish I started reading 10 years ago.... I dislike economics and yet this book made so much sense to me because it was filled with stories. Think of Aesop's fables - this book is kind of like that because each chapter is its own specific story so you can start reading chapter 5, followed by chapter two, then move on to chapter 9, followed by chapter 3 it doesn't really matter they are all individual stories that make sense by themselves no interconnection across them all.

Although when you start reading this book the first golden nugget -"A part of all your own is yours to keep" - is a very important lesson, for me this wasn't the most important lesson. I found the chapter on the camel trader of Babylon (where he talked about the soul of a slave versus the soul of a free man) and the final chapter on the luckiest man from Babylon to be the two chapters that really spoke to me.

I would definitely recommend to keep reading this book every three months just so that the concepts stay in your mind continuously.
… (more)
 
Flagged
alvitoc | 52 other reviews | Jun 28, 2022 |

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Statistics

Works
25
Members
3,819
Popularity
#6,637
Rating
3.9
Reviews
53
ISBNs
218
Languages
19
Favorited
3

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