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Adam Foulds

Author of The Quickening Maze

8+ Works 1,039 Members 48 Reviews

About the Author

Adam Foulds was born in 1974 and lives in south London. In 2001 he graduated from the Creative Writing MA at the University of East Anglia. In 2007 he won a Betty Trask Award for The Truth About These Strange Times and two years later, in 2009, his novel The Quickening Maze was shortlisted for the show more Booker Prize. (Bowker Author Biography) show less

Works by Adam Foulds

The Quickening Maze (2009) 770 copies
In the Wolf's Mouth (2014) 82 copies
The Broken Word (2011) 75 copies
Dream Sequence: A Novel (2019) 44 copies
Ai margini del sogno (2021) 1 copy

Associated Works

Granta 110: Sex (2010) — Contributor — 124 copies
Granta 119: Britain (2012) — Contributor — 110 copies
The PEN / O. Henry Prize Stories 2011 (2011) — Contributor — 97 copies
McSweeney's Issue 42 (McSweeney's Quarterly Concern): Multiples (2013) — Translator/Contributor — 63 copies
Granta 159: What Do You See? (2022) — Contributor — 28 copies
Slightly Foxed 55: Billiards, Tobacco and Wine (2017) — Contributor — 19 copies
Slightly Foxed 62: One Man and his Pigs (2019) — Contributor — 16 copies
Slightly Foxed 42: Small World (2014) — Contributor — 16 copies
European Stories: EUPL winners write Europe (2018) — Contributor — 1 copy

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Reviews

 
Flagged
Kiramke | 36 other reviews | Jun 27, 2023 |
Weak writing. Couldve been an interesting storyline but wasnt. It's going back to the charity shop...
 
Flagged
starbox | 36 other reviews | Nov 27, 2021 |
Very Different Worlds Collide

Dream Sequence does a nice job of rotating both fan obsession with celebrities and celebrity obsession with bigger celebrity over an open fire of droll wit. In the novel, which was long-listed for the Giller Prize, we begin with Kristin, visit her scant seconds in the live of the novel, and then settle in with Henry for a longer bout of desire, neurosis, and insecurity, until Kristin, who we have expected all along, reappears on the scene to find the object of her obsession.

In Philadelphia, Kristin doesn’t have much in her life, except for her love of Henry, an actor she has watched raptly on a PBS style show about the British upper crust. She writes letters of endearment to Henry, who for some reason never answers them, especially when he knows her. Yes, she bumped into him while on a vacation. From that one brief touch, she has worked up a fantasy that they are in love, or that once they renew their acquaintanceship love will ensue. To that end, later in the novel, she takes off for London, Henry’s home.

Is Henry worthy of such rabid desire and affection? Adam Foulds paints a pretty detailed picture of Henry, and he turns out to be human. Insecurity racks him. He’s a television actor. He’s in a period piece. He’s a stereotype. He may never be anything more. Unless, that is, he lands a role in Miguel García’s new film. García’s a composite of director-auteurs you may be familiar with, those of the fat and slovenly school. Henry frets over auditioning for him. Then frets over preparing for the role. Then anguishes over getting physically prepared for the role. Then goes off on a film festival junket in Doha, where he relaxes, somewhat, after taking up with Virginia, one of the women hired to guide guests from event to event. A rogue of sorts, the Virginia thing surprises by turning into a real thing for him and her, or at least as real as anything can get for the guy.

After our long time with Henry, with him on the verge of getting all he wishes, Kristin lands in London. She sees him in Hamlet. She sees his father’s tortured musical centered on the Browning-Barrett love letters, and bumps into to Henry.

Now, you might think you have guessed the ending, but you’re probably very wrong. Sure, things go awry, but how and why, and just how amiss they go, well, that’s for readers of the novel to discover for themselves. And, and yes, Henry does do something in character for him, but dastardly none-the-less, at least if you develop any regard for Kristin.
… (more)
 
Flagged
write-review | 3 other reviews | Nov 4, 2021 |
Very Different Worlds Collide

Dream Sequence does a nice job of rotating both fan obsession with celebrities and celebrity obsession with bigger celebrity over an open fire of droll wit. In the novel, which was long-listed for the Giller Prize, we begin with Kristin, visit her scant seconds in the live of the novel, and then settle in with Henry for a longer bout of desire, neurosis, and insecurity, until Kristin, who we have expected all along, reappears on the scene to find the object of her obsession.

In Philadelphia, Kristin doesn’t have much in her life, except for her love of Henry, an actor she has watched raptly on a PBS style show about the British upper crust. She writes letters of endearment to Henry, who for some reason never answers them, especially when he knows her. Yes, she bumped into him while on a vacation. From that one brief touch, she has worked up a fantasy that they are in love, or that once they renew their acquaintanceship love will ensue. To that end, later in the novel, she takes off for London, Henry’s home.

Is Henry worthy of such rabid desire and affection? Adam Foulds paints a pretty detailed picture of Henry, and he turns out to be human. Insecurity racks him. He’s a television actor. He’s in a period piece. He’s a stereotype. He may never be anything more. Unless, that is, he lands a role in Miguel García’s new film. García’s a composite of director-auteurs you may be familiar with, those of the fat and slovenly school. Henry frets over auditioning for him. Then frets over preparing for the role. Then anguishes over getting physically prepared for the role. Then goes off on a film festival junket in Doha, where he relaxes, somewhat, after taking up with Virginia, one of the women hired to guide guests from event to event. A rogue of sorts, the Virginia thing surprises by turning into a real thing for him and her, or at least as real as anything can get for the guy.

After our long time with Henry, with him on the verge of getting all he wishes, Kristin lands in London. She sees him in Hamlet. She sees his father’s tortured musical centered on the Browning-Barrett love letters, and bumps into to Henry.

Now, you might think you have guessed the ending, but you’re probably very wrong. Sure, things go awry, but how and why, and just how amiss they go, well, that’s for readers of the novel to discover for themselves. And, and yes, Henry does do something in character for him, but dastardly none-the-less, at least if you develop any regard for Kristin.
… (more)
 
Flagged
write-review | 3 other reviews | Nov 4, 2021 |

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