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8+ Works 1,762 Members 50 Reviews

About the Author

William B. Irvine is professor of philosophy at Wright State University. The author of seven books, including A Guide to the Good Life, he has also written for the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Salon, Time, and the BBC. He lives in Dayton, Ohio.

Works by William B Irvine

Associated Works

Musonius Rufus: Lectures and Sayings (2011) — Preface — 97 copies

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Common Knowledge

Legal name
Irvine, William Braxton
Birthdate
1952
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Places of residence
Nevada, USA

Members

Reviews

As a "philosophy of life", Stoicism has a lot to recommend it. Everyone could use a little more tranquillity in their life. I found this book fairly repetitive, but it was ultimately a good, systematic introduction to the Stoics whose philosophies are a kind of mental judo against negative emotions. Well worth consideration by anyone that might struggle with self-worth or fulfilment.
 
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ropable | 35 other reviews | Aug 20, 2023 |
Sort of preachy at times, but an enlightening read.
 
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zeh | 35 other reviews | Jun 3, 2023 |
Dr. Irvine does a remarkable job of showing how aha! moments are a source of delight. He discusses 5 types of aha! moments: moral, religious, mathematics, science and the arts. He shares their similarities and their differences, in addition to their respective challenges. For example, a science aha! moment, once shared, is always open for scrutiny by the very nature of science in that it continually evolves. Whereas mathematics aha! moments are followed by people who try to continually prove and re-prove the presumed discovery. The subconscious mind is the workhorse of an aha! moment but it will only enlighten after the conscious mind has experienced frustration, patience, and sometimes quite a bit of time - rather like "sleeping on a problem." Moral and religious aha! moments differ from the others in that they are may arise from cognitive dissonance and may not require incubation.
I now have an appreciation for our history of great thinkers and their revelations and challenges.
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Kimberlyhi | 1 other review | Apr 15, 2023 |
A very accessible introduction to Stoicism. The author is clearly enthused but to his credit he also allows that others may find another approach to a personal 'philosophy of life' a better fit for themselves.

I find the stoic exhortation to be careful about goals and to accept for one self the goal of doing one's best rather than a particular achievement in the world to fit quite well with Carol Dweck's psychology of the 'growth mindset'.

It's Irvine's exploration of hedonic adaptation and the value of negative visualization that I find most compelling. This by itself is reason enough to explore this philosophy.

In today's world, some of the questions Irvine raises- What is the most helpful approach to grieving, assistance with emotional expression or unassisted bearing? - should be amenable to experimental trial. There is certainly anough grief in the world and you can make the case that we should become as skilled as possible in managing it.

Recommended.
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EdPontius | 35 other reviews | Mar 17, 2023 |

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Works
8
Also by
1
Members
1,762
Popularity
#14,608
Rating
3.9
Reviews
50
ISBNs
38
Languages
3
Touchstones
20

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