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Archibald MacLeish (1892–1982)

Author of J.B.: A Play in Verse

79+ Works 1,548 Members 19 Reviews 2 Favorited

About the Author

Works by Archibald MacLeish

J.B.: A Play in Verse (1958) 887 copies
Poetry and Experience (1961) 62 copies
Conquistador (1932) 24 copies
Poems, 1924-1933 (1933) 18 copies
Songs for Eve (1954) 17 copies
Land of the free (1938) 17 copies
Scratch (1656) 13 copies
Herakles: A Play in Verse (1964) 11 copies
Panic, a play in verse (1935) 8 copies
Actfive, and other poems (1948) 8 copies
Public speech 7 copies
MAC SIX PLAYS (1980) 7 copies
Tower of ivory (1917) 6 copies
TRIBUTE TO A. EDWARD NEWTON CHRISTMAS 1940.|A (1940) — Contributor — 5 copies
Poetry And Opinion (1950) 2 copies
Spiel um Job 2 copies
Housing America 2 copies
Before March 1 copy
October Calf (2020) 1 copy
Nobodaddy : a play (1974) 1 copy
Jews in America (1936) 1 copy

Associated Works

Lady Chatterley's Lover (1960) — Preface, some editions — 13,633 copies
A Pocket Book of Modern Verse (1954) — Contributor, some editions — 443 copies
The Portable Sixties Reader (2002) — Contributor — 327 copies
The 40s: The Story of a Decade (2014) — Contributor — 277 copies
A Comprehensive Anthology of American Poetry (1929) — Contributor — 129 copies
One Act: Eleven Short Plays of the Modern Theater (1961) — Contributor — 106 copies
The Imagist Poem (1963) — Contributor, some editions — 101 copies
Twentieth-Century American Poetry (1777) — Contributor — 97 copies
Twenty Best Plays of the Modern American Theatre (1939) — Contributor — 74 copies
Gods and Mortals: Modern Poems on Classical Myths (1684) — Contributor — 69 copies
Best American Plays: Fifth Series, 1957-1963 (1952) — Contributor — 43 copies
Poetry of Witness: The Tradition in English, 1500-2001 (2014) — Contributor — 42 copies
A Quarto of Modern Literature (1935) — Contributor — 39 copies
An American Omnibus (1933) — Contributor — 31 copies
60 Years of American Poetry (1996) — Contributor — 28 copies
Pulitzer Prize Reader (1961) — Contributor — 27 copies
Vogue's First Reader (1942) — Contributor — 27 copies
The estate of poetry (1962) — Editor, some editions — 21 copies
Great Stories of American Businessmen (1972) — Contributor — 15 copies
Men and Women: The Poetry of Love (1970) — Contributor — 8 copies
The Umbral Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry (1982) — Contributor — 8 copies
The Paris Review 84 1982 Summer (1982) — Contributor — 6 copies
Love Letter from an Impossible Land (1944) — Introduction, some editions — 6 copies
Figures Of Dead Men (1968) — Editor, some editions — 6 copies
Cricket Magazine, Vol. 4, No. 4, December 1976 (1976) — Contributor — 4 copies
Eyes of Boyhood (1953) — Contributor — 2 copies

Tagged

1001 (70) 1001 books (79) 20th century (280) adultery (114) American literature (110) anthology (229) banned books (52) British (168) British literature (199) classic (415) classic literature (59) classics (432) D.H. Lawrence (101) drama (189) England (175) English (111) English literature (219) erotic (53) erotica (167) essays (67) fiction (1,685) history (80) Library of America (64) literature (456) love (71) modernism (79) non-fiction (70) novel (327) own (86) play (57) plays (82) poetry (640) read (161) Roman (81) romance (208) sex (89) sexuality (105) theatre (49) to-read (561) unread (120)

Common Knowledge

Other names
MacLeish, Archie
Birthdate
1892-05-07
Date of death
1982-04-20
Burial location
Pine Grove Cemetery, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, USA
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Birthplace
Glencoe, Illinois, USA
Place of death
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Places of residence
Paris, France
Education
Yale University (AB|English)
Harvard University (LLB)
Occupations
poet
lawyer
Librarian of Congress (1939-1944)
editor
playwright
professor (show all 9)
ambulance driver (WWI)
captain of artillery (WWI)
Assistant Secretary of State
Relationships
MacLeish, Roderick (nephew)
Hemingway, Ernest (friend)
Pound, Ezra (friend)
Frankfurter, Felix (friend)
Dern, Bruce (great-nephew)
Dern, Laura (great-great-niece)
Organizations
American Academy of Arts and Letters ( [1953])
National Institute of Arts and Letters
Academy of American Poets
League of American Writers
Century Club
Tavern Club (show all 26)
Somerset Club
Skull and Bones
Harvard Law Review (editor)
Harvard University
The New Republic (editor)
Fortune Magazine (writer and editor)
Office of Strategic Services
Library of Congress (director)
War Department Office of Facts and Figures (director)
Office of War Information (assistant director)
Amherst College (professor)
U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Conference of Allied Ministers of Education in London (U.S. delegate)
U.S. delegation to London conference drafting UNESCO constitution (chairman)
first U.S. delegate to General Conference of UNESCO in Paris, 1946
first U.S. member of Executive Council of UNESCO
United States Department of State (lecturer in Europe)
Museum of Modern Art (trustee)
Sarah Lawrence College (trustee)
United States Army
Awards and honors
John Reed Memorial prize (1929)
Shelley Memorial Award (1932)
Golden Rose Trophy of New England Poetry Club (1934)
Levinson Prize (1941)
Commandeur de la Legion d'honneur (1946)
Commander, el Sol del Peru (1947) (show all 13)
Bollingen Prize (1952)
Boston Arts Festival poetry award (1956)
Sarah Josepha Hale Award (1958)
Chicago Poetry Day Poet (1958)
Presidential Medal of Freedom (1977)
National Medal for Literature (1978)
Gold Medal for Poetry, American Academy of Arts and Letters (1979)

Members

Reviews

DJ has age wear and other minor issues, but VG cond. overall
½
 
Flagged
JMS62 | Apr 5, 2023 |
This retelling of the Biblical story of Job was written while the horrors of World War Two, especially the destruction of Hiroshima, were still fresh. It holds up well today. MacLeish does a fine balancing act between recounting and questioning the original tale. In particular, the “happy end” of the original is placed in a bitter light. “Mrs.” Job, a one-dimensional figure in the original, becomes a believable character. As Sarah, she neatly counterpoints J.B.’s expansive postwar American outlook. Their dialogue deftly delineates the two branches that developed out of New England Puritanism. I also liked the device of having God and the adversary who tempts him into flinging J.B. into incomprehensible suffering played by two has-been actors who don masks for their parts, reminiscent of the personae of Greek tragedy.… (more)
 
Flagged
HenrySt123 | 11 other reviews | Jul 19, 2021 |
Reading this was fine and good and hard, just like Job is. But seeing it -- there is just something about it. I loved it. I loved all the questions it raises and does not answer. Why is life so hard? Why do bad things happen to good people? Why do good things happen to bad people? What are we to do after we suffer and suffer and suffer? Can we ask questions? Must we curse God and die? Can we not just choose to live? The ultimate to be or not to be, this ancient story made modern so that I can grasp it just a little better.… (more)
1 vote
Flagged
sydsavvy | 11 other reviews | Apr 8, 2016 |

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Statistics

Works
79
Also by
40
Members
1,548
Popularity
#16,637
Rating
½ 3.5
Reviews
19
ISBNs
44
Languages
2
Favorited
2

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