HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Author photo. Courtesy of the <a href="http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?1204376">NYPL Digital Gallery</a> (image use requires permission from the New York Public Library)

Courtesy of the NYPL Digital Gallery (image use requires permission from the New York Public Library)

MembersReviewsPopularityRatingFavorited   Events   
5,474 (6,606)834,005 (4.09)20
Samuel Pepys was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament who is now most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. By his hard work and his talent for administration, he rose to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King Charles II and King James II. The detailed private diary Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century, and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration period. It provides a combination of personal revelation and eyewitness accounts of great events, such as the Great Plague of London, the Second Dutch War and the Great Fire of London. Pepys's diary has become a national monument. The diary was written in one of the many standard forms of shorthand used in Pepys's time, in this case called Tachygraphy; devised by Thomas Shelton. At the end of May 1669, he reluctantly concluded that, for the sake of his eyes, he should completely stop writing and, from then on, only dictate to his clerks which meant he could no longer keep his diary. In total, Pepys wrote for approximately nine years. This collection of both personal and political accounts is an important timepiece that illustartes life in 17th Century England. When Pepys died on May 26, 1703, he had no children and left his entire estate to his nephew, John Jackson. His estate included over 3,000 volumes in his collection of books. All of these were indexed and catalogued; they form one of the most important surviving private laibraries of the 17th century. (Bowker Author Biography)
— biography from The Shorter Pepys
… (more)
The Shorter Pepys 563 copies, 9 reviews
The Diary of Samuel Pepys 493 copies, 5 reviews
The Diary of Samuel Pepys 417 copies, 6 reviews
The Illustrated Pepys 332 copies, 5 reviews
The Great Fire of London 192 copies, 5 reviews
The Diary of Samuel Pepys {1661} 173 copies, 2 reviews
The Diary of Samuel Pepys {1662} 171 copies, 2 reviews
Everybody's Pepys 110 copies, 3 reviews
The Joys of Excess 53 copies, 1 review
Pepys's Later Diaries 24 copies, 1 review
King Charles Preserved 19 copies, 1 review
Diarios (1660-1669) 13 copies, 1 review
Pepys' Diary 2 copies
Dagbog 1 copy
Journal 1 copy
Pepysiana 1 copy
17th century (473) 17th century history (38) 17th century literature (37) 18th century (28) anthology (154) autobiography (336) biography (414) Britain (50) British (58) British history (110) British literature (48) Charles II (32) Christmas (27) classic (32) classics (42) diary (960) Engels (32) England (249) English (62) English History (104) English literature (158) essays (28) fiction (54) Folio Society (77) Great Britain (25) hardcover (31) history (634) journal (136) literature (185) London (249) memoir (177) non-fiction (362) Pepys (246) poetry (71) read (35) restoration (123) Samuel Pepys (147) to-read (148) UK (33) unread (48)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical name
Legal name
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Other names
Date of birth
Date of death
Burial location
Gender
Nationality
Country (for map)
Birthplace
Place of death
Cause of death
Places of residence
Education
Occupations
Relationships
Agents
Organizations
Awards and honors
Short biography
Samuel Pepys was an eyewitness to numerous great events of his day, including the Restoration of King Charles II, the Great Plague of 1665, and the Great Fire of London in 1666. He chronicled all these events for about a decade in a day-to-day diary that is considered one of the greatest historical records and journals in the English language.
Disambiguation notice

Member ratings

Average: (4.09)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5 2
2 27
2.5 13
3 88
3.5 22
4 200
4.5 27
5 234

Improve this author

Combine/separate works

Author division

Samuel Pepys is currently considered a "single author." If one or more works are by a distinct, homonymous authors, go ahead and split the author.

Includes

Samuel Pepys is composed of 16 names. You can examine and separate out names.

Combine with…

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,219,415 books! | Top bar: Always visible