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59+ Works 3,836 Members 73 Reviews 9 Favorited

About the Author

Douglas Rushkoff was born on February 18, 1961. After graduating from Princeton University he received an MFA in Directing from California Institute of the Arts. He has written numerous magazine columns on topics including cyberculture and has been aired on CBS Sunday Morning and NPR's All Things show more Considered and published in The New York Times and Time magazine. Rushkoff has taught at the MaybeLogic Academy, NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program, and the Esalen Institute, and he teaches media studies at the New School University. Rushkoff lectures around the world about media, art, society, and change at conferences and universities. He consults to museums, governments, synagogues, churches, universities, and companies on new media arts and ethics. Rushkoff won the first Neil Postman award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity. He is on the Boards of the Media Ecology Association, The Center for Cognitive Liberty and Ethics, Technorealism, The National Association for Media Literacy Education, MeetUp.com, and Hyperwords. His bestselling books include graphic novels, Cyberia, Media Virus, Playing the Future, Nothing Sacred: The Truth about Judaism, Get Back in the Box: Innovation from the Inside Out, Coercion, and Life Inc. (Bowker Author Biography) show less
Image credit: KLRU's Engaging Speaker Series, April 2007, photo by Bruce Turner

Series

Works by Douglas Rushkoff

Coercion: Why We Listen to What "They" Say (1999) 407 copies, 3 reviews
Present shock : When everything happens now (2013) 354 copies, 10 reviews
Media Virus! (1994) 236 copies, 2 reviews
Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus (2017) 194 copies, 6 reviews
Ecstasy Club (1997) 192 copies, 1 review
Nothing Sacred: The Truth About Judaism (2003) 148 copies, 2 reviews
Testament, Vol. 1: Akedah (2006) 140 copies, 6 reviews
Team Human (2019) 139 copies, 4 reviews
Testament, Vol. 2: West of Eden (2007) 92 copies, 5 reviews
Testament, Vol. 3: Babel (2007) 57 copies, 3 reviews
Club Zero-G (2004) 52 copies, 1 review
Aleister & Adolf (2016) 49 copies, 2 reviews
Testament, Vol. 4: Exodus (2008) 46 copies, 5 reviews
Exit Strategy (2001) 44 copies, 1 review
A.D.D.: Adolescent Demo Division (2012) 40 copies, 2 reviews
Stoned Free: How to Get High Without Drugs (1995) — Author — 34 copies
Bull (2000) 26 copies
Sarah Sze (1998) 17 copies
Frontline: Digital Nation [2010 TV episode] (2010) — Screenwriter — 7 copies
Free Rides (1991) 7 copies
Testament Omnibus (2014) 4 copies
Testament #01 (2005) 3 copies
Testament #02 (2006) 3 copies
Testament #05 (2006) 2 copies
Testament #03 (2006) 2 copies
Testament #04 (2006) 2 copies

Associated Works

This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking (2012) — Contributor — 809 copies, 17 reviews
What Is Your Dangerous Idea? Today's Leading Thinkers on the Unthinkable (1914) — Contributor — 633 copies, 8 reviews
Bookmark Now: Writing in Unreaderly Times (2005) — Contributor — 254 copies, 3 reviews
Disco 2000 (1998) — Contributor — 97 copies, 1 review
Painful But Fabulous: The Life and Art of Genesis P-Orridge (2002) — Foreword, some editions — 47 copies
2033: Future of Misbehavior (2007) — Contributor — 47 copies, 2 reviews
Frontline: The Merchants of Cool [2001 TV episode] (2005) — Narrator — 24 copies, 1 review
Frontline: The Persuaders [2004 TV episode] (2004) — Narrator — 14 copies, 1 review
Maybe Logic : The Lives And Ideas Of Robert Anton Wilson [2003 film] (2003) — Actor, some editions — 13 copies
Disinformation: The Complete Series (2003) — Contributor — 8 copies
The Tomorrow Project Anthology (2011) — Contributor — 5 copies

Tagged

anthology (68) atheism (32) business (52) comics (58) computers (24) conspiracy (36) culture (77) cyberpunk (19) disinformation (45) ebook (35) economics (48) essays (116) fantasy (28) fiction (91) goodreads (30) graphic novel (78) graphic novels (28) history (52) ideas (21) internet (55) Judaism (20) Kindle (28) media (122) media studies (26) non-fiction (404) philosophy (90) politics (81) psychology (82) read (68) religion (104) science (152) science fiction (61) self-help (20) society (31) sociology (112) technology (95) to-read (449) unread (44) Vertigo (24) writing (50)

Common Knowledge

Birthdate
1961-02-18
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Places of residence
Brooklyn, New York, USA
Occupations
teacher
author
Relationships
Rushkoff, Barbara (wife)
Organizations
Open Source Judaism
New York University
Short biography
Douglas Rushkoff is a media analyst, author, and documentarian. [from What We Believe But Cannot Prove (2006)]

Members

Reviews

I really wanted to like this book. I'm all for being on "team human" and being the master of our digital world (not the other way around). But ... this book felt more like an angry old man groaning about how terrible those computer-machines are.

Don't get me wrong, there are some good points in here and several concepts and ideas I highlighted to remember. But the weight of "here's why everything is terrible" to "here's what we can do about it" was so off-balance it made it unenjoyable to read.… (more)
 
Flagged
teejayhanton | 3 other reviews | Mar 22, 2024 |
I like Douglas Rushkoff's ideas around civilization and human-ness. I agree with him in general about the isolating effects of the way we "connect" today. What I didn't love about the book is that so many of his 100 "statements" just say things as if they're obviously true. I wasn't always so sure. I also think I could have gotten as much out of watching a few more of his videos on YouTube.
 
Flagged
jbaty | 3 other reviews | Dec 29, 2023 |
sustainability and reasonable profit over unrealistic growth objectives that largely benefit the 1%
 
Flagged
pollycallahan | 5 other reviews | Jul 1, 2023 |
Probably you only need to read his essay about this, https://onezero.medium.com/survival-of-the-richest-9ef6cddd0cc1, to get the key point: Today’s billionaires are using the fantasy of escape to explain why they should be continuing doing the things that will destroy the world for most of us and require an escape in the first place. But they can’t outrun climate change (or solve worries about keeping their security forces in line, perhaps with control collars or control over the food, or both), so we should probably use their fantasies as further reasons to stop allowing them to make things worse.… (more)
½
 
Flagged
rivkat | 2 other reviews | Mar 3, 2023 |

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Works
59
Also by
14
Members
3,836
Popularity
#6,611
Rating
½ 3.6
Reviews
73
ISBNs
122
Languages
10
Favorited
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