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Suetonius

Author of The Twelve Caesars

117+ Works 8,009 Members 119 Reviews 9 Favorited

About the Author

Series

Works by Suetonius

The Twelve Caesars (0120) 6,420 copies
Caligula (1600) 202 copies
Divus Julius (0002) 88 copies
Divus Augustus (1939) 74 copies
Nero (1974) 62 copies
Divus Claudius (1986) 55 copies
Tiberius (1998) 43 copies
De vita Caesarum libri VIII (1964) 38 copies
Quae supersunt opera (2010) 35 copies
Domitian (2004) 29 copies
Vespasian (2000) 26 copies
Galba (1993) 13 copies
Vitellius (2004) 11 copies
Titus (2011) 9 copies
Otho (2011) 6 copies
VIDAS DE CESAR (2007) 4 copies
Unlu Kisiler (2012) 3 copies
Het leven van Antonius en van Octavianus (1963) — Contributor — 2 copies
Suetonius összes művei (2004) 2 copies
Romerske kejsere (1989) 1 copy
Perandorët e Romës (1984) 1 copy
Suetonius (Vol. II) (2008) 1 copy

Associated Works

Roman Readings (1958) — Author — 67 copies

Tagged

ancient (108) ancient history (327) Ancient Rome (263) antiquity (99) Augustus (37) biography (561) Caesar (48) Caesars (34) Caligula (34) classic (56) classical (48) classical history (53) classical literature (67) classical studies (36) classics (371) emperors (39) Folio Society (122) history (1,310) Italy (39) Julius Caesar (40) Latin (245) Latin literature (95) literature (86) Loeb (56) Nero (39) non-fiction (368) Penguin Classics (65) politics (36) read (43) Roma (32) Roman (173) Roman Emperors (43) Roman Empire (166) Roman History (338) Roman literature (46) Rome (428) Suetonius (120) Tiberius (33) to-read (229) translation (97)

Common Knowledge

Canonical name
Suetonius
Legal name
Tranquillus, Gaius Suetonius
Birthdate
69 (circa)
Date of death
131 (circa)
Gender
male
Nationality
Roman Empire
Country (for map)
Italy
Birthplace
Hippo Regius, Roman Africa (probably)
Places of residence
Hippo Regius
Occupations
historian

Members

Discussions

On Suetonius, and TV about Roman Art. in Ancient History (May 2013)
Suetonius' Twelve Caesars in Ancient History (September 2010)

Reviews

Të njohësh historinë e Romës përmes jetës së 12 augustëve është njëkëndvështrim interesant, që jo vetëm të shtyn për ta çuar deri në fund, por edhe një formë tërheqëse të mësuari. Gjërat në libër thuhen troç, me elegancë (madje edhe kur është fjala për zjarr e për vrasje), me shije të kulluar aristokratike dhe me një frymë të shëndetshme artistike dhe patriotike. Ky libër u vlen së tepërmi nxënësve të shkollave tëmesme, ashtu edhe studentëve
 
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BibliotekaFeniks | Dec 7, 2023 |
Excellent introduction to the beginnings of the Roman Emperors.
 
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everettroberts | 73 other reviews | Oct 20, 2023 |
Suetonius is a greater chore to read than Tacitus, but his gossip is juicier. Pliny the Younger (of Letters fame) was Suetonius' patron, helping to secure him a sequence of senior positions in the empire. He rose to this height on the strength of his scholarship, and that is on display here in the greatest of his works. His format, however, is prone to challenge. It is not a chronologically history, as in Plutarch, but a categorized listing of the key elements which stand out about each of the first twelve Caesars of Rome. This may have suited conventions of the time but perhaps not the subject matter.

Robert Graves did a famous translation of this work, and it shows in his novel "I, Claudius" which I read a couple of years ago. I'm glad I read that first, so that I could read through its source material after the fact and make all the connections. Suetonius paints a very dark portrait of Tiberius, and makes it clear that the loss of Germanicus as an alternative heir to Augustus was a terrible blow to Rome. Tiberius was malicious, and Caligula was such a horror show it's only a wonder he wasn't murdered sooner. Claudius feels more maligned than he deserves; that might be Graves rubbing off on me but surely he could have been more appreciated for not being a monster, as they soon got again in Nero (and again foregoing a better choice, Britannicus.) The next six Caesars are covered more briefly as the title was tossed around for a few months until Vespasian caught it, handing it down to his sons.

Not one of these Caesars, not even the kinder ones, envisioned the concept of restraining their power in some codified way. There is only the occasional discussion about restoring the Republic, an idea that never got serious wheels under it. Thus whenever the new Caesar started delivering random off-with-their-heads orders, off went the heads, until the inevitable assasination so that the next Caesar could start it all over again. I'm looking forward to Gibbon's story of how well that turned out for them.
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1 vote
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Cecrow | 73 other reviews | Aug 27, 2023 |
As Nick said, "Of course you didn't like a 2000 year old book. Look at 'Die Hard', it's only 20 years old."

 
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blueskygreentrees | 73 other reviews | Jul 30, 2023 |

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Statistics

Works
117
Also by
2
Members
8,009
Popularity
#3,024
Rating
4.1
Reviews
119
ISBNs
323
Languages
22
Favorited
9

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