Picture of author.

Brooke Foss Westcott (1825–1901)

Author of The New Testament in the Original Greek

47 Works 1,918 Members 18 Reviews 2 Favorited

About the Author

Image credit: Brooke Foss Westcott. Frontispiece from Life and letters of Brooke Foss Westcott, D.D., D.C.L., sometime Bishop of Durham (1903)

Works by Brooke Foss Westcott

The Bible in the Church (1864) 58 copies
The Historic Faith (1904) 12 copies
Christian Aspects of Life (1897) 6 copies
1881 Westcott-Hort Greek New Testament (1881) — Editor — 5 copies
Bishop Lightfoot (1997) 4 copies
Words of faith and hope (1902) 2 copies
Peterborough sermons (1904) 2 copies
Lessons from Work (1901) 2 copies
The Christian Life (2016) 1 copy

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Birthdate
1825-01-12
Date of death
1901-07-27
Gender
male
Birthplace
Birmingham, England, UK

Members

Reviews

A General Survey of the History of the Canon of the New Testament
 
Flagged
Gordon_C_Olson_Libr | Apr 5, 2022 |
The Greek Text with Notes and Essays
 
Flagged
Gordon_C_Olson_Libr | 2 other reviews | Apr 5, 2022 |
Bound with: Greek-English lexicon to the New Testament / by W. J. Hickie
 
Flagged
ME_Dictionary | 3 other reviews | Mar 19, 2020 |
If you're the sort who prefers Shakespeare to modern drama, this book may be for you.

New Testament textual criticism is the term used for comparing ancient copies of the New Testament and using them to determine the original text which stood behind all those corrupted copies. (And, yes, they're corrupt; there are thousands of them, and they don't agree.)

Textual criticism has existed since the beginning of printing, and even earlier, but it wasn't until the nineteenth century that it became serious and scholars started to look at the earliest manuscripts. Finally, at the end of the nineteenth century, Westcott and Hort sat down and created a theory to explain what they found in the manuscripts -- and used that theory to edit the New Testament.

This is the book that explains their theory, which classified manuscripts as "Neutral," "Alexandrian," "Western," and "Syrian." And although most moderns don't quite accept this theory (they call the "Syrian" text "Byzantine," and combine the "Neutral" and "Alexandrian" texts), the texts they edit are still very much like Westcott and Hort.

A lot about this book is difficult. New Testament scholars now use different symbols for the manuscripts, which must be translated. Hort's examples usually are not real world; they're mostly hypothetical. And the style is rather stiff. But if you don't understand Westcott and Hort, you aren't a modern New Testament textual critic. This book changed everything.
… (more)
 
Flagged
waltzmn | Nov 23, 2013 |

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Statistics

Works
47
Members
1,918
Popularity
#13,419
Rating
½ 3.6
Reviews
18
ISBNs
145
Languages
4
Favorited
2

Charts & Graphs