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Location: Somerville, MA, United States

Little Libraries

There are 11 "Little Libraries" within 25 miles.

Local venues

79 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
226 Pearl St., Somerville, MA 02145
Hub Comics (0.5 miles)
19 Bow St., Somerville, MA 02143
55 Elm St., Somerville, MA 02144
115 Broadway, Somerville, MA
45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
1 Francis Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
25 White Street, Cambridge, MA 02140
Lorem Ipsum Books (1.0 miles)
1299 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02139
22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
Barefoot Books (1.0 miles)
1771 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140
34 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
2 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
The Book Shop (1.1 miles)
694 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02144
Knafel Building, Concourse Level, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
450 Jefferson Laboratory 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Science Center, 7th Floor, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Science Center 1 Oxford Street, Room 318, Cambridge, MA 02138-2901
Science Center Room 250, One Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Science Center, Third Floor, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Local events

Mar
25
Community Mural Project
Thayer Public Library, Saturday, March 25 at 11am
We're building a mural and you can be one of our artists!
In celebration of One Braintree, One Book: The Muralist, we are making our own community mural!
We are very excited about this and anyone from adults, teens, and kids 9 & older can participate in this painting program. So roll up your sleeves and come be a part of this mural project! The mural will be on display for the duration of our One Braintree One Book celebration.
No registration required.
One Braintree One Book is reading The Muralist. The One Braintree One Book program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Mar
25
Daytime Book Group
Maynard Public Library, Saturday, March 25 at 12pm
Mar
26
Adventures in Wonderland with the Friends
Thayer Public Library, Sunday, March 26 at 2pm
Please join the Friends of the Library on Sunday afternoon, March 26th, from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM when we bring Alice's Wonderland to Braintree! Our afternoon of adventures will include games; visits and photos with the Mad Hatter, raffles; Alice themed activities; and an English-style Marketplace with vintage accessories, dolls, books, teapots, and jewelry for sale. Fun for all ages...families to seniors.
Tickets are available by request at the Reference Desk on the Lower Level of the library. Tickets are FREE, but limited. Attendees will be asked to sign up when they pick up tickets. Remember, the library is open most Sunday afternoons now, 1-5 p.m., through May 7th!
Brighten up these last days of winter by spending some time in our delightful Wonderland. Come be enchanted! (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Mar
26
Harriet Scott Chessman presents "The Lost Sketchbook of Edgar Degas"
The Concord Bookshop, Sunday, March 26 at 3pm
Please join us on Sunday, March 26 at 3pm, when Harriet Chessman presents her new historical novel, The Lost Sketchbook of Edgar Degas.

There will be an opportunity for conversation with the author and a book-signing after the presentation.

This event is a free event. Should you wish to purchase a signed/inscribed copy of the book, but are unable to attend the author presentation, please give us a call to pre-order.

** A lyrical novel about what art can reveal, and a nuanced imagining of the people who influenced Edgar Degas and his work. With key roles for beloved Degas paintings. **

Ten years after Edgar Degas’ 1872 visit to New Orleans, a lost sketchbook surfaces. His Creole cousin Tell -- who lost her sight as a young woman -- listens as her former child-servant describes the drawings and reads Degas’ enigmatic words. It’s both cryptic and revelatory, leading Tell to new understandings of her marriage, her difficult, brilliant cousin Edgar, her daughter Josephine, and herself.

Harriet Scott Chessman is the author of the acclaimed novels "The Beauty of Ordinary Things," "Someone Not Really Her Mother," "Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper," and "Ohio Angels." She is also the author of the libretto for My Lai, a contemporary operatic piece commissioned by Kronos Quartet in 2015. She has taught literature and creative writing at Yale University, Bread Loaf School of English, and Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Mar
28
Ariel Ezrachi and Maurice E. Stucke, Virtual Competition: The Promise and Perils of the Algorithm-Driven Economy
Wasserstein Hall, Tuesday, March 28 at 12pm
Ariel Ezrachi and Maurice E. Stucke, Virtual competition: The Promise and Perils of the Algorithm-Driven Economy

Coauthor Maurice Stucke speaking and signing, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University (cosponsored by the Harvard Law Entrepreneurship Project and the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Harvard Law School) (added from Harvard University Press)… (more)
Mar
28
Noam Maggor, Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age
Boston Public Library, Tuesday, March 28 at 8pm
Noam Maggor, Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age

Speaking at the Boston Public Library (added from Harvard University Press)
Mar
29
Jeffrey L. Amestoy, Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr.
Medford Public Library, Wednesday, March 29 at 7pm
Jeffrey L. Amestoy, Slavish shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Speaking at the Medford Public Library (added from Harvard University Press)
Mar
31
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design
Boylston Hall, Friday, March 31 at 8:30pm
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design

An Evening with Iris Bohnet, sponsored by the Alumnae/i Network for Harvard Women and the Harvard Alumni Association (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
2
Free author event with Cass Sunstein and "#republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media"
The Concord Bookshop, Sunday, April 2 at 3pm
Please join us on Sunday, April 2 at 3pm, when Cass Sunstein presents his new work, "#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media." This is a free event; there will be time after the presentation for Q&A and book signing.

Cass R. Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School. His many books include the New York Times bestsellers "Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness" (with Richard H. Thaler) and "The World According to Star Wars." He lives in Massachusetts.

As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand each other. It's also no surprise that terrorist groups have been able to exploit social media to deadly effect.

Welcome to the age of #Republic.

In this revealing book, Cass Sunstein shows how today's Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism--and what can be done about it.

Thoroughly rethinking the critical relationship between democracy and the Internet, Sunstein describes how the online world creates "cybercascades," exploits "confirmation bias," and assists "polarization entrepreneurs." And he explains why online fragmentation endangers the shared conversations, experiences, and understandings that are the lifeblood of democracy.

In response, Sunstein proposes practical and legal changes to make the Internet friendlier to democratic deliberation. These changes would get us out of our information cocoons by increasing the frequency of unchosen, unplanned encounters and exposing us to people, places, things, and ideas that we would never have picked for our Twitter feed.

#Republic need not be an ironic term. As Sunstein shows, it can be a rallying cry for the kind of democracy that citizens of diverse societies most need. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
3
Stephen Burt, The Poem Is You: Sixty Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them
Harvard Book Store, Monday, April 3 at 7:30pm
Stephen Burt, The poem is you: Sixty Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them

In conversation with Chloe Garcia Roberts, editor of the Harvard Review (signing to follow), Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
4
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design
The Brattle Theatre, Tuesday, April 4 at 6pm
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design

In conversation with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Max Bazerman (signing to follow), Brattle Theatre (sponsored by Harvard Book Store) (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
4
Adam S. Wilkins, illustrated by Sarah Kennedy, Making Faces: The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face
The Harvard Coop, Tuesday, April 4 at 8pm
Adam S. Wilkins, illustrated by Sarah Kennedy, Making Faces: The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face

Speaking and signing, The Harvard Coop (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
6
Catherine J. Ross, Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights
Harvard Graduate School of Education, Thursday, April 6 at 1pm
Catherine J. Ross, Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights

Speaking at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
6
Richard Higgins presents "Thoreau and the Language of Trees"
The Concord Bookshop, Thursday, April 6 at 7pm
Please join us on Thursday, April 6 at 7pm, when Concordian Richard Higgins discusses his new book, "Thoreau and the Language of Trees."

There will be a time for questions, conversation, and a book signing after the presentation. This is a free event.

Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language.

In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Richard Higgins is a former longtime staff writer for the Boston Globe, the coauthor of "Portfolio Life: The New Path to Work, Purpose, and Passion after 50," and the coeditor of "Taking Faith Seriously." His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Christian Century, and Smithsonian. He lives in Concord, Massachusetts.
Books ⋅ Literature (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
6
Daniel R. Coquillette and Bruce A. Kimball, On the Battlefield of Merit: Harvard Law School, the First Century
Isaac Royall House and Slave Quarters, Thursday, April 6 at 7:30pm
Daniel R. Coquillette and Bruce A. Kimball, On the Battlefield of Merit: Harvard Law School, the First Century

Bruce Coquillette speaking and signing, New England Historical Society (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
9
Andrew Forsthoefel presents "Walking to Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story at a Time"
The Concord Bookshop, Sunday, April 9 at 3pm
Please join us on Sunday, April 9 at 3pm, when Andrew Forsthoefel talks about Walking to Listen, which shares his journey across the country, and the tales of the people he met along the way.

Andrew Forsthoefel is a writer, radio producer, and public speaker. After graduating from Middlebury College in 2011, he spent nearly a year walking across the United States. It was the greatest privilege and blessing of his life. He now facilitates workshops on walking and listening as practices in personal transformation, interconnection, and conflict resolution. He is currently based in Northampton, Massachusetts.

A memoir of one young man’s coming of age on a cross-country trek—told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

Life is fast, and I’ve found it’s easy to confuse the miraculous for the mundane, so I’m slowing down, way down, in order to give my full presence to the extraordinary that infuses each moment and resides in every one of us.

At twenty-three, Andrew Forsthoefel walked out the back door of his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, with a backpack, an audio recorder, his copies of Whitman and Rilke, and a sign that read WALKING TO LISTEN. He had just graduated from Middlebury College and was ready to begin his adult life, but he didn’t know how. So he decided he’d walk. And listen. It would be a cross-country quest for guidance, and everyone he met would be his guide.

Walking toward the Pacific, he faced an Appalachian winter and a Mojave summer. He met beasts inside: fear, loneliness, doubt. But he also encountered incredible kindness from strangers. Thousands shared their stories with him, sometimes confiding their prejudices, too. Often he didn’t know how to respond. How to find unity in diversity? How to stay connected, even as fear works to tear us apart? He listened for answers to these questions, and to the existential questions every human must face, and began to find that the answer might be in listening itself.

Ultimately, it’s the stories of others living all along the roads of America that carry this journey and sing out in a hopeful, heartfelt book about how a life is made, and how our nation defines itself on the most human level. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
11
Allyson Hobbs, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life
Harvard Book Store, Tuesday, April 11 at 7pm
Allyson Hobbs, A chosen exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
13
David A. Moss, Democracy: A Case Study
David A. Moss, Democracy: A Case Study

Speaking and signing, Baker Library, Harvard Business School (Books@Baker series) (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
13
Jim Shepard presents "The World to Come"
The Concord Bookshop, Thursday, April 13 at 7pm
Please join us on Thursday, April 13 at 7pm, when Jim Shepard presents his new short fiction collection, "The World to Come: Stories."

“Without a doubt the most ambitious story writer in America,” according to The Daily Beast, Jim Shepard now delivers a new collection that spans borders and centuries with unrivaled mastery.

These ten stories ring with voices belonging to - among others - English Arctic explorers in one of history’s most nightmarish expeditions, a young contemporary American negotiating the shockingly underreported hazards of our crude-oil trains, eighteenth-century French balloonists inventing manned flight, and two mid-nineteenth-century housewives trying to forge a connection despite their isolation on the frontier of settlement. In each case the personal is the political as these characters face everything from the emotional pitfalls of everyday life to historic catastrophes on a global scale. In his fifth collection, Shepard makes each of these wildly various worlds his own, and never before has he delineated anything like them so powerfully.

Jim Shepard is the author of seven novels and four previous story collections. He lives in Williamstown, Massachusetts, with his wife, three children, and three beagles. He teaches at Williams College. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
17
Linda M. Heywood, Njinga of Angola: Africa’s Warrior Queen
Harvard Book Store, Monday, April 17 at 7pm
Linda M. Heywood, Njinga of Angola: Africa’s Warrior Queen

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
18
Viet Thanh Nguyen, Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War
Harvard Book Store, Tuesday, April 18 at 7pm
Viet Thanh Nguyen, Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
21
Samuel J. Redman, Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums
Porter Square Books, Friday, April 21 at 7pm
Samuel J. Redman, Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums

Speaking and signing, Porter Square Books (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
22
Loren Graham, Lysenko’s Ghost: Epigenetics and Russia
Harvard Book Store, Saturday, April 22 at 3pm
Loren Graham, Lysenko’s Ghost: Epigenetics and Russia

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
25
Crystal King presents "Feast of Sorrow"
Cambridge Public Library - Main Branch, Tuesday, April 25 at 7pm
Please join us in the auditorium on Tuesday, April 25th, when Crystal King presents her book, Feast of Sorrow. Porter Square Books will be on hand to purchase books.

Set amongst the scandal, wealth, and upstairs-downstairs politics of a Roman family, Crystal King’s seminal debut features the man who inspired the world’s oldest cookbook and the ambition that led to his destruction. (crystallyn)… (more)
Apr
28
Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility: Luck, Choice, and the Welfare State
Harvard Book Store, Friday, April 28 at 3pm
Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility: Luck, Choice, and the Welfare State

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
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