Series: New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies

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Works (6)

Digital literacies : concepts, policies and practices by Colin Lankshear3
Adolescents and Online Fan Fiction (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies) by Rebecca W. Black23
DIY Media: Creating, Sharing and Learning with New Technologies (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies) by Michele Knobel44
Digital Content Creation (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies) by Drotner K. /Schroder K. C. (eds.)46
The place of the classroom and the space of the screen : relational pedagogy and internet technology by Norm Friesen50
Learning to Play (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies) by Myint Swe Khine53

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Series description

New literacies emerge and evolve apace as people from all walks of life engage with new technologies, shifting values and institutional change, and increasingly assume 'postmodern' orientations toward their everyday worlds. Despite many efforts to take account of such changes, educational institutions largely remain out of touch with the range of new ways of making and sharing meanings that increasingly mediate and shape the lives of the young people they teach and the futures they face. This series aims to explore some key dimensions of the changes occurring within social practices of literacy and the educational challenges they present, with a view to informing educational practice in helpful ways. It asks what are new literacies,how do they impact on life in schools, homes, communities, workplaces, sites of leisure, and other key settings of human cultural engagement, and what significance do new literacies have for how people learn and how they understand and construct knowledge? It aims to challenge established and 'official' ways of framing literacy, and to ask what it means for literacies to be powerful, effective, and enabling under current and foreseeable conditions. Collectively, the works in this series will help to reorient literacy debates and literacy education agendas.


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LunaSlashSea (8)
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