VBA and SQL book recommendations

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VBA and SQL book recommendations

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1archerygirl
Mar 30, 2007, 3:44am

I've finally been given the budget to buy a couple of reference books for my department, but I don't want to waste the money on books that aren't going to be terribly helpful to us. Which is why I've come here :-)

We mainly use VBA for Excel and SQL in our work (please don't laught at me - it's the company's tools of choice *sigh*). I'm reasonably good at Googling when I'm not quite sure how to do what I need to, but sometimes even working out what term I need to Google for is difficult. So if anyone has any good suggestions for reference texts on either subject, I'd be most grateful. The kind of thing that I can flick through when I need to know how to get Excel doing something funky with Outlook or what I should be looking for the next time I need to programatically mess around with Pivot Tables would be really helpful. If it has hints and tips on writing more efficient VBA, that would also be really good.

I've got the O'Reilly SQL Pocket Guide sitting in my desk drawer, which is very useful when trying to remember exactly how something I don't use regularly works, but is there a big book equivalent to it that I could invest in? We use Teradata SQL, which is faily ANSII compliant (except when it isn't...) so one of the general SQL texts usually gives me a starting point, at least.

All recommendations will be gratefully received.

2GreyHead
Mar 30, 2007, 4:36am

A few years ago I did a big Excel Macro project using VBA and found Microsoft Excel 2000/Visual Basic for Applications Fundamentals a good working reference. I don't know if it's been updated since.

3M_Bartley First Message
Nov 20, 2007, 2:49pm

The thing about VBA is that it has been around for a long time, and there are lots of used books on Amazon and AbeBooks.com.

If you search on VBA Excel in either of those, you will get hits.

New books cost $40 or more, but you can get used books for $5 or so. Just be sure to email the sellers BEFORE purchasing to verify that the CDs are in the book. I prefer the older books to the latest books because the latest books don't go into the deep technical information that the older books did. Also, I prefer having the CD in my hands to having to download it. It's quite reasonable that you will need to reference material three or four years from now, and if you have the book, you've got the CD. The URLs will probably be obsolete in a year or two, so you'll have to download the whole website.

Amazon will let you look at the covers, which usually explain what level of expertise the book is aimed at, and also the Tables of content will let you see what's in the books.