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Imagery Poem

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1BradonK
Apr 5, 2012, 7:00pm Top

Does anyone know what an imagery poem is?

2oldstick
Jun 2, 2012, 10:11am Top

I guess it is a poem full of imagery, metaphors, similes and such like.
If it isn't "I wandered lonely as a cloud," then it is something far more modern and fantastic like:
"Yellow fangs, glowing in darkness
Bright orange eyes
Jewels that burn
Droplets of dank moisture
In a mask of hate
Night terror."

I stand ready to be corrected.

3Booksloth
Jun 6, 2012, 6:19am Top

What oldstick said. (Adding a bit more) - an 'image' in the literary sense, is a word picture. It's a bit more complicated than just describing a scene and it is usually created by the effective use of metaphor and simile. Martin Gray's Dictionary of Literary Terms gives the example of a poem by Keats, which describes a beach like this -

" . . . 'twas a quiet Eve/ The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave/ An untumultuous fringe of silver foam/ Along the flat brown sand."

Rocks are always silent so to mention this fact creates the illusion that their silence is a choice and they are normally capable of making all kinds of sounds. And the sea cannot weave 'an untumultuous fringe of silver foam' or anything else but the use of metaphor here helps to create an image of a still silent night on a beach much better than if the poet had just said 'it was a still, silent night on the beach'. If it paints a picture in your mind (or if that is its intention) then it's imagery.

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