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Notes on publishing II: Midnight Vengeance

Literary Snobs

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1kswolff
Jul 3, 2012, 10:33pm Top

Writers as the Other 1%:

http://katherinescottnelson.com/2012/03/05/the-one-percent/

Sure puts things in perspective.

2anna_in_pdx
Jul 17, 2012, 11:17am Top

Hm, I thought it was ever thus. Remember Snoopy always getting rejection letters?

3ajsomerset
Jul 17, 2012, 3:36pm Top

When one considers that the 1% of submissions that get published easily overwhelm the number of people interested in reading them, glutting the market with stories, it seems that perhaps 1% is a bit too generous.

4kswolff
Jul 28, 2012, 11:05pm Top

For those of you interested in acquiring the near-mythical tome, Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini, good news! It's been reprinted and it's now available ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Seraphinianus

In 2006, a revised, relatively inexpensive (89 Euros/120USD) edition, with new illustrations and a "preface" by the author, was released in Italy:

Milano: Rizzoli, 2006, 384 pp., ISBN 88-17-01389-7;
Milano: Rizzoli, 2008, 384 pp.


Bibliophiles takes note.

5CliffBurns
Oct 26, 2013, 12:34am Top

Andrew Wylie, super-agent, is more bullish on the future of publishing than you'd think:

http://www.newrepublic.com/node/115007/print

(From Gord)

6anisoara
Edited: Oct 26, 2013, 5:12am Top

Andrew Wylie, super-agent, has royally screwed over a leading translator. Here are a few accounts of what happened. Mr Wright's account is, quite understandably, emotionally charged:

http://arablit.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/making-it-visible-jonathan-wright-on-not...

http://jnthnwrght.blogspot.fr/2013/10/why-translators-should-give-dr-alaa-al.htm...

and

http://www.complete-review.com/saloon/#jm2 ("Translation tribulations: forthcoming Alaa al-Aswany novel
")

and

http://translationista.blogspot.com.br/2013/10/when-translators-get-shafted.html

and

http://www.rochester.edu/College/translation/threepercent/index.php?id=8512

The behaviour of Alaa al-Aswany and Andrew Wylie has been appalling. It has also emerged that the publisher, Knopf, engages translators under "work for hire provisions", meaning that, although they may credit the translator as such, the translator does not retain copyright over his/her own work. This is far from twenty-first century practice.

7CliffBurns
Oct 26, 2013, 10:01am Top

Fascinating. I had a friend who did a lot of translation work in Germany. For the amount of work and effort involved, the stipend you receive is downright minuscule.

8anisoara
Oct 26, 2013, 11:49am Top

Agreed. No one becomes a literary translator to get rich - it's a real labour of love. It's really shocking to see this highly talented, skilled and dedicated professional being abused in this fashion.

9CliffBurns
Oct 26, 2013, 12:42pm Top

Absolutely.

10kswolff
Oct 27, 2013, 11:24pm Top

This kind of puts things into perspective:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z8_GND_5296

12CliffBurns
Mar 2, 9:25pm Top

Another good one from Gord.

This article talks about the changing publishing landscape, the vast changes the internet and its offshoots have spawned. Writers, even critically lauded, award-winning scribes, are finding it next to impossible to make ends meet:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/02/bestseller-novel-to-bust-author-lif...

One quote that caught my eye:

"Roughly speaking, until 2000, if you wrote a story, made a film or recorded a song, and people paid to buy it, in the form of a book, a DVD or a CD, you received a measurable reward for your creativity. Customers paid because they were happy to honour your creative copyright. When the internet began in the 1990s, many utopian dreams of creating an open society, where information would be free for all, sprang into prominence. Wikipedia, for instance, is the child of such dreams. Today, Wikipedia is appealing to its users for subscriptions."

13CliffBurns
Mar 4, 1:08pm Top

The state of publishing/writing, as discussed at the recent Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Seattle:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2014/03/poetry-in-seattle-an-awp-dia...

14Jargoneer
Mar 5, 8:58am Top

>13 CliffBurns: - I can honestly say that the only thing that article taught me is that some people have jobs with good perks.

15CliffBurns
Mar 5, 9:05am Top

So you DID get something out of it, you devil.

16Jargoneer
Mar 5, 9:12am Top

>15 CliffBurns: - I already knew that and I also know I'm not one of them. Beyond that I can't be certain of knowing anything.

17CliffBurns
Mar 5, 9:16am Top

"I can't be certain of knowing anything."

Now you sound like Spinoza...or Andre Breton. Too clever for me at eight in the morning.

18Jargoneer
Mar 5, 10:47am Top

Eight in the morning? What are you talking about? It's now almost 4 in the afternoon.

19CliffBurns
Mar 5, 11:15am Top

Happy hour.

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