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WWII Reading for October?

Second World War History

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1Ammianus
Edited: Oct 20, 2007, 11:39am Top

Just read: The Ghost Mountain Boys: Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guin ... by James Campbell (see my review), now reading Hitler's War in the East, 1941-1945: A Critical Assessment (War and Genocide) by Rolf-Dieter Muller (massive comprehensive bibliographies). The Admiralties.

2akagodsent
Oct 20, 2007, 10:39am Top

"Hitler's War in the East" is a good read.
Reading:
"Defiance: The Bielski Partisans" by Nechama Tec
Already finished this month:
"Taking Risks" Joseph Pell and Fred Rosenbaum
"Stalin's Spy" Robert Whymant

3jmnlman
Oct 20, 2007, 5:27pm Top

Lentolaivue 24 superb unit history.

4Ammianus
Oct 21, 2007, 7:40am Top

War Department's The Admiralties and Taaffe's MacArthur's Jungle war : the 1944 New Guinea campaign.

5OldSarge
Oct 23, 2007, 4:23am Top

Starting on The Ghost Mountain Boys: Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guinea-The Forgotten War of the South Pacific by James Campbell.

Army National Guard units thrown into combat without proper equipment or training isn't a new thing. Just more of the same old, same old.

6usnmm2
Edited: Oct 23, 2007, 7:01am Top

In may 1940 a future U.S.President wrote a little book called Why England Slept. The President was John F. Kennedy. It was written as an answer to Winston Churchills book While England Slept.
Although I've just started to read it. it should be intesting as his father was the ambassador to England untill he was recalled by F.D.R.

7Ammianus
Oct 23, 2007, 10:19am Top

It's a good read, one tough mission, with MacArthur cracking the whip on everyone.

8AmandaB18
Oct 23, 2007, 2:43pm Top

I'm almost finished with War Stories: Remembering World War II by Elizabeth Mullener

And next I'm going to start either Ghost Soldiers or Flyboys

9Ammianus
Oct 27, 2007, 9:07am Top

Reading Michael Korda's excellent new biography, IKE: An American hero. I've read most of the standard Ike bio's: Ambrose, D'Este, Perrett, Blumenson, etc, but I really like this well-written, snappy volume. (I'm thinking 4stars at the moment)

10steiac
Oct 27, 2007, 6:46pm Top

re: JFK. Do I recall some controversy over whether he actually wrote that book or had it written for him? I vaguely recall but could be wrong.

11jmnlman
Oct 27, 2007, 7:24pm Top

The Gouzenko Transcripts an edited volume of evidence provided to the royal commission investigating Soviet spying in Canada during WWII. Very interesting. Also touches upon the various atomic espionage carried out in the US and UK.

12usnmm2
Edited: Oct 28, 2007, 4:53am Top

#10 steiac,
I believe it was and expantion on his senior paper for collage. He Must have had much access to material as his father was ambassador to England till he was recalled by FDR for saying that Europe's problems were not worth the blood one bike riding American boy. So I guess he most likly had help. But it's still a good read either way. It's like Shakespear does it really matter who wrote the plays.
Just read / or watch and enjoy. Leave the rest up to up to peaple who don't have the soul just to enjoy them.
And as far as Why England Slept the observations and conclusions are just as valid no matter how much or how little help he had.

13Schmerguls
Edited: Nov 2, 2007, 9:41pm Top

I have done some World War II reading this month, and my favorite therein is: 4370 The Day of Battle The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 Volume Two of The Liberation Trilogy, by Rick Atkinson (read 11 Oct 2007). I have posted a comment thereon in Library Thing

14Ammianus
Oct 29, 2007, 1:56pm Top

Great to hear! Next on my reading list!

15jmnlman
Oct 30, 2007, 9:15pm Top

Bitter Ocean:the Battle of the Atlantic, 1939-1945 by David Fairbank White decent history. He mentions the RCN which naturally I like.

16Donogh
Oct 31, 2007, 4:58am Top

Just finishing Quartered Safe Out Here by George McDonald Fraser. Wonderfully written (if strangely/refreshingly low-level - at times the author doesn't even know where his section is!) memoir of the latter stages of the Burma campaign.
At time deadly serious, and at time side-splittingly hilarious (I'm sure people on the train have been worried about me, especially when he describes how one of the old hands in the section handled the password system). Well worth a look.

17Ammianus
Edited: Oct 31, 2007, 7:21am Top

RE: Quartered, I concur, great book. He really outdid his self with that. And I FINALLY have started The Day of Battle The War in Sicily and Italy 1943-1944 --thumbs up already. Atkinson's quite a good writer.

18RobertMosher
Oct 31, 2007, 10:10am Top

I also enjoyed Quartered Safe Out Here - I like Fraser and it seems the British do these sorts of memoirs better, I have always kept an eye out for WWII memoirs from tank crewmen hoping for a first hand view of armored warfare (to balance out what all the tank generals tell us). If you haven't already read it, you may want to take a look at John Masters' memoir of the same war, The Road Past Mandalay.

Robert A. Mosher

19Ammianus
Oct 31, 2007, 11:47am Top

RE tanks: Brazen Chariots comes to mind...

20Donogh
Oct 31, 2007, 12:29pm Top

Just tried a tagmash on
"Memoir, Tanks"
and on
"Memoir, Armour"
and noticed these two, which look interesting:
Another river, another town : a teenage tank gunner comes of age in combat and
By Tank into Normandy

21Ammianus
Oct 31, 2007, 3:33pm Top

RE Another River: I read it but passed it on (say about a 2.5?)

22jztemple
Nov 1, 2007, 6:34am Top

I picked up The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 yesterday at Borders to use up my 30% off coupon. When I will be able to get to it, who knows?

I'll also recommend The Road Past Mandalay, an excellent book.

23JonSowden
Edited: Nov 5, 2007, 2:53am Top

Partial list of WWII British Armoured Memoirs:
Bill Bellamy - "Troop Leader"
Ken Tout - several, incl "A Fine Night For Tanks", "Tanks, Advance!", and "Tank!"
Michael Carver - several, esp "Out of Step"
Patrick Delaforce - several, incl "the Black Bull"
Stuart Hills - "By Tank into Normandy"
Stuart Hamilton - "Armoured Odyssey"
Robert Crisp - "Brazen Chariots"
Andrew Wilson - "Flamethrower"

24RobertMosher
Nov 5, 2007, 11:35am Top

Jon -
Excellent listing!

I have a number of these including Ken Tout's Tank! 40 hours of Battle and Tanks, Advance! Normandy to the Netherlands, 1944; Stuart Hills' By Tank into Normandy; Andrew Wilson's Flame Thrower - about the Churchill 'Crocodile' flamethrower tanks; and Robert Crisp's Brazen Chariots and The Gods Were Neutral. There is also Stephen Dyson's Tank Twins about twin brothers from London's East End serving in Churchills from 1943-45; Cyril Joly's Take These Men which includes service in Grant/Lee tanks in the Western Desert. I've recently picked up Leakey's Luck: A Tank Commander with Nine Lives edited by George Forty and Armored Crusader by Kenneth Macksey which is the biography of Percy Hobart, one of Britain's most ingenious tank officers.

There is a somewhat related and interesting memoir also in Somerset de Chair's The Golden Carpet which recounts the British campaign in Iraq in 1941.

I have also picked up some interesting novels about tanks during World War II:

Colin Forbes' Tramp in Armour is about a Matilda tank crew in France in 1940. G F Borden's Easter Day 1941 is set in North Africa. The Killing Ground by Elleston Trevor is about a Churchill tank unit during the Normandy invasion while David Holbrook's Flesh Wounds is described as an autobiographical novel about a British tank officer who commands a Sherman tank during the invasion.

Robert A. Mosher
(I think I may have overwhelmed the touchstone feature here!)

25JonSowden
Nov 11, 2007, 7:14pm Top

Thanks Bob, or should I go for the twee-points and say "tanks Bob"?

Another one for the list:
Jake Wardrop (ed George Forty) - "Tanks across the desert"

Group: Second World War History

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