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What We Are Reading: Science Fiction & Fantasy

75 Books Challenge for 2017

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1drneutron
Dec 20, 2016, 12:07pm Top

Danger, Will Robinson! You may get buried under your TBR stack with the suggestions from this thread!

2Storeetllr
Edited: Jan 3, 2017, 5:14pm Top

Just finished my first book of 2017, The Fall of the House of Cabal, latest (and maybe last) in the Johannes Cabal, Necromancer comic steampunk horror series. Such fun! (My review is here.)

3Kristelh
Jan 3, 2017, 8:01pm Top

I am reading Ethan of Athos by Lois McMaster Bujold. my second book by the author. Theme is genetic engineering.

4sibyx
Edited: Jan 3, 2017, 9:56pm Top

>3 Kristelh: Ah, I like that Bujold--she does have great ideas.

I'm finishing up the seventh in the Kate Elliott series Crown of Stars. I've read the Jaran series and the Shadow Gate series. This is the most ambitious and there is a lot I have loved about it--but I have to admit I am flagging a wee bit here at the end, although that may just be that I am reluctant to let go and say good-bye to this world I've lived in now for about two months! I loved the Shadow series, only three books, a tighter weave.

5BookLizard
Jan 3, 2017, 10:52pm Top

I'm currently reading Heartless by Marissa Meyer. It's based on Alice in Wonderland and tells the story of Catherine, the young lady who would one day become the Queen of Hearts.

6drneutron
Jan 4, 2017, 8:26am Top

I'm about halfway through Ready Player One, an 80s pop culture romp. Great fun!

7Helenoel
Jan 4, 2017, 9:48am Top

I'm reading Kurt Vonnegut's Galapagos - not sure how I missed this one earlier- it is scarily prescient, as Vonnegut is wont to be.

8rretzler
Jan 5, 2017, 10:52pm Top

>3 Kristelh: I've been reading my way through Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga, but am not yet up to Ethan of Athos. Loving the series, though!

>6 drneutron: Loved Ready Player One! Lots of nostalgia - plus I recently learned that Ernest Cline is from Ohio!

I'm currently reading The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin, which I am enjoying quite a bit.

9roundballnz
Jan 6, 2017, 1:53am Top

Starting 2017 with Rig 3rd book best read after Barricade & "Steeple" so you don't find yourself in a world which makes no sense ... but for those who have read them, there is more filling of the backstory which gives depth to all the books .....

10Storeetllr
Jan 9, 2017, 4:09pm Top

A friend posted this on my FB page: a site that is giving away a whole bunch of science fiction and fantasy ebooks through January 15. I haven't looked through the entire batch yet, and I don't know anything about the website that's offering the free ebooks, but I thought I'd share in case anyone is interested. http://sffbookbonanza.com/freebooks/#fantasy

11sibyx
Jan 15, 2017, 5:05pm Top

I just picked up Linda Nagata's Deception Well second in a series which starts with Vast which I read in 2015 and liked just enough to continue.

12sibyx
Edited: Jan 31, 2017, 9:32am Top

Back to add that I finished Deception Well and then picked up Vast but put it down, just didn't compel me sufficiently.

13Kristelh
Feb 1, 2017, 8:16pm Top

I read The Fireman by Joe Hill which I think qualifies as science fiction and fantasy.

I read Sweet Lamb of Heaven which is tagged psychological thriller but there is a fit of science fiction/fantasy with that one as well.

14avatiakh
Feb 1, 2017, 8:52pm Top

I've just finished Naomi Alderman's The Power which was a rather good look at young teenage girls developing a devastating power, one they can use to kill or overpower males. Society throughout the world undergoes a transformation.

15fuzzi
Feb 1, 2017, 8:56pm Top

I read The Green Hills of Earth and Judgement on Janus last month. I've another "vintage" Robert Heinlein in the queue for February.

16jnwelch
Feb 2, 2017, 5:27pm Top

I'm enjoying a re-read of Clifford Simak's City.

17fuzzi
Feb 2, 2017, 6:11pm Top

::waves at jnwelch::

18jnwelch
Feb 2, 2017, 6:48pm Top

>17 fuzzi: Ha! Good to see you, fuzzi!

19Kristelh
Feb 5, 2017, 7:17am Top

Just finished The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams. Such fun!

20PawsforThought
Feb 5, 2017, 7:40am Top

>19 Kristelh: Oh, I really want to get to the Dirk Gently novels. I watched the Netflix show over the holidays and loved it, which gave me another push. Maybe this summer - Adams always makes for great summer reading.

21nrmay
Edited: Feb 5, 2017, 1:49pm Top

Now reading The Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

Must finish! Can't renew at the library; there are multiple holds on this book.

22fuzzi
Feb 5, 2017, 3:04pm Top

Finished Orphans of the Sky...dated, but a pretty good read.

23sibyx
Feb 9, 2017, 10:33am Top

Yeah, Heinlein is becoming harder and harder to read. Some of them last amazingly well, others don't.

24Kristelh
Feb 9, 2017, 12:13pm Top

Currently reading Barrayar. Great book.

25drneutron
Feb 9, 2017, 4:32pm Top

I've started a re-read of Hyperion.

26rretzler
Feb 9, 2017, 10:57pm Top

Finished reading Borders of Infinity by Lois McMaster Bujold a few days ago. The Vorkosigan Saga is really growing on me - I love Miles charisma and brilliance.

27roundballnz
Feb 9, 2017, 11:02pm Top

Finished reading Fallen dragon Love it, can see why peeps are stating its Hamilton's best book

Now having a bit of a binge & moved onto Pandora's star

28jnwelch
Feb 11, 2017, 11:03pm Top

Just finished Binti Home, and it was as good as Binti. Can't wait for the next one.

29avatiakh
Feb 12, 2017, 12:02am Top

>27 roundballnz: It was good wasn't it.

30Kristelh
Feb 12, 2017, 6:52am Top

Finished Barrayar by Lois McMaster Bujold,. My favorite of the Vorkosigan series.

31roundballnz
Feb 13, 2017, 3:50am Top

>29 avatiakh: Very much so .......

32fuzzi
Feb 13, 2017, 9:02pm Top

>30 Kristelh: my favorite too, I think.

33bell7
Feb 14, 2017, 12:37pm Top

I just finished Wayfarer by Alexandra Bracken and am looking forward to starting King's Cage by Victoria Aveyard tonight.

34rretzler
Feb 16, 2017, 10:04pm Top

Currently reading Cetaganda by Lois McMaster Bujold - continuing the Vorkosigan Saga.

35sibyx
Edited: Feb 19, 2017, 11:36am Top

Love the Vorkosigan novels!

Any Liaden nuts out there? I can't remember the significance of discovering you are a "dragon" say, as opposed to a Healer or a dramliza or whatever . . . I assume it means you are the primary defender of the Korval clan? Directly "inherited" role from Jela? Too long a gap between readings, obviously.

Trying not to spoil, so I won't mention what book I am reading!

36Storeetllr
Feb 19, 2017, 1:38pm Top

Love both the Vorkosigan and the Liaden novels! In fact, I just spontaneously started a reread of the Vorkosigan series. Didn't mean to, but this year seems to be my Year of the Reread - fully half of all I've read so far has been rereads.

I don't know for sure about the significance of "dragon" but your idea sounds good to me. Looking forward to the new Liaden coming out this year - continuing the Theo arc.

37jnwelch
Feb 21, 2017, 5:32pm Top

>35 sibyx: I'm a big Liaden fan, Lucy. I'm waiting for the new one to come out in May.

Right now I'm reading Six Wakes, involving clones on a space ship trying to figure out how a disaster happened and who the murderer is.

38luvamystery65
Feb 24, 2017, 11:41am Top

Finished A Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers. What a great debut novel by Chambers. This is a fun adventure of the spaceship Wayfairer. She is a tunnel ship and her crew gets the opportunity for a large contract, but it's a long haul. The territory they are headed to is fraught with unknowns and the only known is violence. The characters were well developed and it was a fun adventure. I look forward to more adventures in this universe.

Started Old Man's War by John Scalzi!

39drneutron
Feb 24, 2017, 1:47pm Top

Just finished Hyperion, Dan Simmons' epic space opera structured along Canterbury Tales' lines. Held up well on re-read after 30 years. :)

40ronincats
Feb 24, 2017, 10:05pm Top

The Nebula Award nominations are out, and all are available at my library. I'm overwhelmed (only read two of the 12 books) and talking about it here: http://www.librarything.com/topic/247160#5948171
but you can find the list without my commentary here:
http://nebulas.sfwa.org/sfwa-announces-2016-nebula-norton-bradbury-award-nominee...

41jnwelch
Feb 25, 2017, 10:13pm Top

Six Wakes was good. The buzz had me expecting a bit more.

42sibyx
Edited: Feb 26, 2017, 8:10pm Top

>37 jnwelch: wl'd Six Wakes

>38 luvamystery65: Loved Long Way etc.!

>39 drneutron: I have got to get to Hyperion!!

>40 ronincats: Uh oh, Nebula's - - I have found it best to wait a year or two unless people are simply raving about a book.

And I've picked up The Legacy of Gird - by Elizabeth Moon -- which is two novels in one huge volume, the first being Surrender None, the second Liar's Oath.

43ronincats
Mar 17, 2017, 12:23pm Top

Got an email from HumbleBundle yesterday about their latest ebook bundle, women of science fiction and fantasy. This is a set-up where the more you pay, the more books you get, and $15 will usually get you the entire batch--well worth it. These are the ones announced so far, with more to come.
A HumbleBundle that is well worth the money for the top tier:

https://www.humblebundle.com/books/women-of-scifi-and-fantasy-book-bundle

Current authors & titles with more to come:

Jo Clayton: Skeen's Leap
Katherine Kurtz: Lammas Night & Camber of Culdi
Octavia E Butler: Parable of the Sower, Parable of the Talents, Unexpected Stories
Elizabeth Hand: Wylding Hall, Black Light, Saffron and Brimstone
Kate Elliott: Jaran
Diana Pharoah Francis: Path of Fate
Robin McKinley: Sunshine, Beauty, The Hero and the Crown
Pamela Sargent: The Shore of Women
Jane Yolen: Sister Light, Sister Dark

44fuzzi
Mar 17, 2017, 2:18pm Top

>43 ronincats: I've read books by Katherine Kurtz including Camber of Culdi. They're good, solid reads.

45Kristelh
Edited: Mar 17, 2017, 5:36pm Top

I read Version Control this month. I liked it quite a bit. Set in the very near future and seemed believable. Time travel, physics, 1984 revisited.

46humouress
Jun 7, 2017, 12:09am Top

Checking in here, from the May Martians and Magic thread. I'll have to come back and read through properly, when I'm feeling more limber and able to dodge book bullets.

47fuzzi
Jun 7, 2017, 6:52am Top

>46 humouress: hahahaha!

48drneutron
Jun 7, 2017, 10:00am Top

Finished up City of Miracles last night. Wow, what an ending!

49benitastrnad
Jun 7, 2017, 10:28am Top

#48
Ok. You hit me with a book bullet. My library has the first one in this series, so I will put it on the reading list.

50benitastrnad
Jun 7, 2017, 10:31am Top

I finished Court of Wings and Ruin and was disappointed in this ending. The book seemed to me to have been written in a big hurry and the author pulled out all the current political, social, and cultural tropes she could and used them, including a major story digression that will obviously be resolved in a later novella or short story. I really wish authors would do this. They should concentrate on producing a quality novel instead of hurrying to satisfy fan clamor for a sequel.

I am now reading Summerland by Michael Chabon. This is a children's novel about summer and baseball inside of a, so far, delightful fantasy.

51Storeetllr
Jun 7, 2017, 3:38pm Top

I'm reading (the audiobook of) Three-Body Problem. I'm sure it's only coincidental that a couple of weeks ago I read Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time and Dennis Taylor's first Bobiverse novel We Are Legion, and all three books have to do with concepts of theoretical physics.

52avatiakh
Jun 8, 2017, 1:35am Top

The 2017 Women's Bailey Prize was won last night by Naomi Alderman's feminist scifi The Power. She was mentored by Margaret Atwood when she wrote this. I read The Power earlier this year and enjoyed it.

53humouress
Edited: Jun 8, 2017, 1:52am Top

I'm back and have now read through the thread; am fairly unscathed except for a few twinges from old wounds, namely Liaden and a reminder to continue with the Vorkosigan saga. (I need a bit of a break though; I've just finished the Inda quartet, featuring another not-so-tall, scarred young military genius.) I could (re)read some Elizabeth Moon, but I have her on my shelves already (where she seems quite comfortable, thank you).

ETA: by the way - Inda quartet, by Sherwood Smith; highly recommended.

54Kristelh
Jun 9, 2017, 5:24pm Top

Finished Left Hand of Darkness and Ender's Game this month.

55rretzler
Jun 11, 2017, 2:07pm Top

>54 Kristelh: Both great books! The Ender's Game series is one of my all time favorites.

I'm currently reading through the Imperial Radch trilogy - finished Ancillary Justice and Ancillary Sword and started reading Ancillary Mercy this morning.

56benitastrnad
Jun 11, 2017, 2:31pm Top

#55
I really liked that series. Some people I know couldn't get past the first third of the first book, but if you can it is totally worth the ride. I thought book 2 was particularly strong.

57rretzler
Jun 11, 2017, 2:47pm Top

>56 benitastrnad: I agree - I almost gave it up before the first 50 pages, it was difficult for me to keep going, but I kept telling myself there must be some reason it won the Hugo, Nebula and Clark awards. Now I know why!

58Kristelh
Jun 11, 2017, 5:01pm Top

Starting Seveneves by Neal Stephenson today.

59Storeetllr
Jun 15, 2017, 8:35pm Top

This month's free Tor.com’s eBook of the Month Club is Old Man's War by John Scalzi. Check it out here.

60benitastrnad
Jun 16, 2017, 11:05am Top

I am about half done with Summerland and I think this would make an outstanding read aloud for grade 4 - 6.

I also started Golem and the Jinni and this is another great book. I am really enjoying my books right now.

61Storeetllr
Jul 15, 2017, 2:45pm Top

Calling all scifi and fantasy fans! Penguin's First-to-Read program is offering a whole bunch of interesting-sounding early review books to their members. I chose Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra because I have been wanting to read it after having recently reread Ramses the Damned: The Mummy, but there were a couple others that also called to me so may request more than one this time around. I've read some really good early review books through this program (and a couple of meh ones, tbh, but nothing's perfect, right?), for nothing more than a review by a certain date, usually 3-4 weeks after you get the book. Good deal, huh? http://www.firsttoread.com/Default.aspx

62ronincats
Jul 15, 2017, 2:55pm Top

Thanks for the heads-up, Mary. I requested Reincarnation Blues.

63Bonannoa
Jul 15, 2017, 3:00pm Top

This user has been removed as spam.

64Storeetllr
Jul 15, 2017, 3:13pm Top

I was looking at that one too, Roni. It sounds really fun. I may restrain myself so others can get books they want, because I got the Anne Rice book for sure (I "bought" it with some points). I'll look forward to knowing your thoughts on Reincarnation Blues.

65sirfurboy
Jul 19, 2017, 4:49am Top

>61 Storeetllr: Looks like it is US only... although I could always lie about my location I suppose!

66Storeetllr
Jul 19, 2017, 1:15pm Top

Oh, darn! I forgot that it's only open to the US. I am sorry. I always wondered how it can be known where a person is when using the internet.

67jnwelch
Jul 21, 2017, 3:21pm Top

I'm enjoying the space opera Leviathan Wakes.

68benitastrnad
Jul 21, 2017, 3:58pm Top

I just finished reading the best summertime book EVER!!!!! Summerland by Michael Chabon. Some people say it is magical realism and some think it is children's fantasy. I think it is just great! I have been reading it over my lunch hour at work. I sit outside to eat, and this book fit perfectly with the heat of the summer and an hour of time by myself. I agree with Mark that this book is too long - (500 pages) for a children's book and it seems that the author throws everything but the kitchen sink into the plot. However, the author, being Chabon, is forgiven. Maybe. If I had my druthers I would say that it could be a shorter tighter book and it wouldn't hurt anything. But, why quibble? What a huge celebration of endless summer!

69Kristelh
Jul 21, 2017, 7:18pm Top

>68 benitastrnad: that sounds like a great book but 500 pages

70humouress
Jul 26, 2017, 1:39am Top

I've just finished Sky of Swords: a Tale of the King's Blades by Dave Duncan, a story of the politics of succession in a medieval fantasy setting, without the blood and gore of A Game of Thrones. Convoluted and engaging, but if you're reading it, I would read all three in the series close together so you can keep track of details.

According to Duncan, you can read the books in any order, keeping in mind that there are differences because each is told from the perspective of different principal characters. I read The Gilded Chain first, followed by Lord of the Fire Lands and then this one and I think that sequence works well.

71benitastrnad
Edited: Jul 26, 2017, 1:06pm Top

On the TOR blog there was a recent posting about 25 women authors who have series that are worthy of being made into a TV series or a movie and Mishell Baker was one of the authors listed. She has written a series called the Arcadia Project and Borderline was the first title in the series.

I found this novel to be a very inventive take on urban fantasy tropes involving all things fairy. The main character was very interesting and the supporting cast had a few outstanding characters that contributed greatly to the story. There was plenty of detective action along with a flawed main character that showed growth. The potential for more titles in the series showed in the first book. At times it read like a prospectus for a TV series, and I did find that somewhat annoying, but overall it was a good read. There are now three titles in the series and I most certainly will read the second one.

This isn't great literature on the lines of some SciFi/Fantasy I have read lately, but it was perfect relaxation material. Just right for summer. Not a summer novel like Summerland was, but a good read for taking it easy - mentally and physically.

72sibyx
Aug 31, 2017, 8:30am Top

I'm way behind posting here -- but I just picked up The Rift Uprising. We'll see. It might be a bit chirpy for me.

73jnwelch
Aug 31, 2017, 3:58pm Top

I've started the last one in N.K. Jemison's Broken Earth trilogy, The Stone Sky.

74benitastrnad
Aug 31, 2017, 7:55pm Top

I think I forgot about this thread.

I read both of the Mishell Baker urban fantasy titles in August. They are part of a series that is being title Arcadia Project. They were good, so when the new one comes out in January I will have to look for it.

I also read the fantasy romance novels by Amanda Bouchet. A Promise of Fire and Breath of Fire these were fun vacation reading but I doubt I will read the third when it comes out next year.

Right now I am listening to the second book in the Septimus Heap fantasy series for children. Flyte is a rollicking good sorcerers book that centers around sibling rivalry. The narrator for this series is Gerard Doyle and he is so good that even a mediocre book is fun listening.

75humouress
Aug 31, 2017, 11:18pm Top

I'd forgotten too! Not that I've done much reading in the meantime. I've just finished Komarr in my re-read of the Vorkosigan series, which I'm drawing out to savour as long as possible (despite the group read being pretty much done). Enjoying it!

76benitastrnad
Sep 1, 2017, 11:47am Top

I listened to the Red Queen series by Victoria Aveyard on my vacation. This turned out to be a great series and even though it is 18 hours there and back it turned out to not be enough time to completely finish what I thought was a trilogy. However, I learned that this is an ongoing series and there are now four books in the series with the promise of more installments to come. That is a good thing as this series, while it sometimes gets overwrought with to much teen angst, has been a very pleasant surprise. The introductory title in the series, Red Queen was a world building novel that had an inventive take on the standard YA dystopian fantasy. The series did not suffer the second book slump syndrome. Glass Sword was as exciting a book as the first. The third book King's Cage was somewhat of a surprise as the author changed up the literary writing style by using a different point-of-view approach. Distinctive sections of the novel are written from the point-of-view of three characters. Mare, the heroine of the story is one character. Cameron, a secondary character introduced in the second novel is another and the third is Evangeline, who is an anti-hero in the previous novels. The addition of the last two as major players in the book was a surprise. And surprise! The surprise worked for me. It added some spice and kept the series fresh. It also helped that I was listening to this novel. The narrator for the series is first rate, but in this third novel there are two other readers. Each character in the novel gets their own distinctive voice, not only in the literary sense but in the literal sense. This technique worked very well.

If you are looking for a series to listen to - I would highly recommend this series.

77Kristelh
Sep 1, 2017, 12:42pm Top

I am currently reading The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and will be reading Soulless by Gail Carriger and finishing the last volume of The Return of the King of The Lord of the Rings.

78bell7
Sep 4, 2017, 10:14am Top

>73 jnwelch: Ooh, I just finished the first in that trilogy and thought it was phenomenal! Usually I try to space out books in a series so I don't get tired of the storyline/characters/writing/whatever, but I put a hold on book 2 immediately and am hoping I get it soon to keep going.

79humouress
Sep 4, 2017, 12:09pm Top

I read Komarr so I could refresh my memory before going on to A Civil Campaign, which I've now finished, too. Much as I want to find out what happens next, I'm going to refrain from going straight onto the next Vorkosigan Saga book, so I can put the end off for as long as possible.

80benitastrnad
Sep 6, 2017, 8:40pm Top

I finished listening to the second in the Septimus Heap series Flyte by Angie Sage. The recorded version of this series is great listening. I am still enjoying this children's series.

81jnwelch
Sep 6, 2017, 10:32pm Top

>78 bell7: The conclusion is likewise excellent! It'll be interesting to see whether it gets the third Hugo for the series.

82sibyx
Sep 30, 2017, 11:12am Top

Recently finished The Way of Kings. While the physical book is a doorstopper, the story inside is not, it is a pageturner. Looking forward to book 2, but I'm reading some other books in my active pile first as once I start it I know I won't stop.

83benitastrnad
Oct 2, 2017, 12:31pm Top

I am reading Carnival by Elizabeth Bear and just started Nine-Fox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee.

84karspeak
Oct 2, 2017, 1:17pm Top

I am reading the third book in the Bobiverse, about which I have very mixed feelings.

85ronincats
Oct 8, 2017, 9:26pm Top

Here's a great article about Nnedi Okorafor and fantasy! I've read three of hers and have another on the shelf.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/06/books/ya-fantasy-diverse-akata-warrior.html

86benitastrnad
Oct 10, 2017, 7:03pm Top

I am listening to Truthwitch book 1 in the Witchlands series by Susan Dennard on my commute. So far it is very good.

87jnwelch
Oct 11, 2017, 2:26pm Top

>85 ronincats: I'm with you, Roni. I've read three by Okorafor, and want to read more.

Right now I'm reading Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee. I'm enjoying it, but some of the concepts are tough going for me - e.g. the "moths", and the calendrical underpinnings.

88drneutron
Oct 11, 2017, 2:31pm Top

>87 jnwelch: So one of the themes Lee seems to be pursuing is how what we believe determines our reality. Take the political discussions - "the world" as we see it depends on our view of hot button issues. Lee is taking this to extremes - reality is fluid, but is fixed by the consensus beliefs of the people. The calendar systems in the book are ways of organizing belief to firm up reality the way the leaders want. And when a competing calendar system is imposed, it shifts the nature of reality. Hence the emphasis on calendar heresy and such.

89jnwelch
Oct 11, 2017, 4:01pm Top

>88 drneutron: That helps, Jim, thanks. And the moths? :-)

90drneutron
Oct 11, 2017, 4:05pm Top

Yeah, that one's a mystery to me. 😀

91benitastrnad
Oct 11, 2017, 6:37pm Top

#88
I wondered about the under-lying theme in this book. I sort of got the idea that the calendar was like a religious thing that fixed all the people in the far flung parts of the empire in a certain time and space and helped with cohesion. I didn't think of it as a belief system. That take on it explains the weird letters back and forth between the two conspirators. I was beginning to think that the revolution was just a game they made up.

I do like the characters and have just got to the part Nerevor plays in things.

The action scenes are superbly written. I think I am going to have to spring for the sequel because my library doesn't have it.

92sibyx
Oct 21, 2017, 12:30pm Top

I'm just getting into the Ada Palmer Too Like the Lightning.

93jnwelch
Oct 21, 2017, 1:45pm Top

I’m enjoying Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata Witch.

94drneutron
Oct 21, 2017, 3:24pm Top

Jumped into the Bob-O-Verse with We are Legion (We are Bob)!

95jnwelch
Oct 21, 2017, 4:49pm Top

Go Bob(s)!

96Kristelh
Oct 22, 2017, 8:02pm Top

Started The Fifth Season today.

97sibyx
Nov 7, 2017, 8:52am Top

Finished up Too Like the Lightning -- very challenging but worth it. Now I'm into Ken McLeod's Cosmonaut Keep.

98sibyx
Nov 18, 2017, 9:10pm Top

Just finished up Max Gladstone's Three Parts Dead - first in a series that I think I will pursue, now to reread Jennifer Fallon's Wolfblade read originally in 2010, too long ago! It's one of those series with batches of threes and so Wolfblade is book 4 and I just collected 5 and 6. I think I kept the first three, but I don't feel the need to reread those too, thank goodness!

99jnwelch
Nov 28, 2017, 4:54pm Top

I'm about to give Ann Leckie's Provenance a go.

100sibyx
Nov 28, 2017, 4:58pm Top

Ooooo that is hidden in the bag of books for Christmas! Sooo tempting.

101BookLizard
Nov 28, 2017, 7:22pm Top

I'm reading Warcross by Marie Lu.

102ronincats
Nov 28, 2017, 11:25pm Top

I've been warbling about a couple of recent reads on my own thread, and just realized I needed to post them over here too.



Book #130 1632 by Eric Flint (597 pp.)

This book has been on my shelf for several years, at least. I raced through it yesterday and today. It's an interesting premise, several square miles of West Virginia small town transported to the middle of 1600's Germany and what might ensue, plus lots of history along with political thinking and beautiful strong women. I enjoyed it, but I think one might be enough.



Book #133 Provenance by Ann Leckie (440 pp.)

Ah yes, THIS is why I fell in love with science fiction! Engaging protagonist, good side characters, wonderful world-building, action-fiLLED plot, not too complex but quite clever--totally entertaining. I read it straight through on Saturday despite not feeling all that well. Recommended!



Book #134 A Matter of Oaths by Helen S. Wright (328 pp.)

This Kindle book came to my attention via the article below. Written (and forgotten) in 1988, it is being re-released now.

https://www.tor.com/2017/11/21/sleeps-with-monsters-helen-s-wrights-a-matter-of-oaths/

Like Leckie's book, this is science fiction space opera focused on individuals and yet with the scope of a galaxy. People you care about, adventure and action, space ships--another one that was very enjoyable and highly recommended.

103drneutron
Nov 29, 2017, 2:58pm Top

That last one looks interesting!

104jnwelch
Nov 30, 2017, 11:52am Top

With a nudge from Roni, I'm a little over halfway through Provenance and liking it.

105Storeetllr
Nov 30, 2017, 10:58pm Top

Just started listening to Andy Weir's new scifi novel Artemis. Very different from The Martian, but I am enjoying it so far. I like the reader (Rosario Dawson). And I've got Provenance waiting for me on my Kindle.

106drneutron
Dec 1, 2017, 9:15am Top

>105 Storeetllr: mrsdrneutron finished the audiobook just a few days ago - her opinion pretty well matches yours. Different but good. I didn't know Dawson was the reader.

107Storeetllr
Dec 1, 2017, 3:39pm Top

>106 drneutron: A little further on in the book, the protagonist is starting to get on my nerves. Also, I find it hard to root for characters who are basically criminals. I'll keep going, tho, because I loved The Martian so much and am hopeful his second novel is also enjoyable.

108BookLizard
Dec 7, 2017, 8:37am Top

107> I know what you mean about rooting for criminals, but maybe when you learn more of her backstory, you'll cut her some slack. She's definitely made some costly mistakes in her life. When it comes to criminal characters, I tend to separate the law-breakers from the violent criminals. After all, in many dystopian novels, the government or "law" is oppressive and unjust.

109Storeetllr
Edited: Dec 8, 2017, 2:02pm Top

>108 BookLizard: Thanks for the words of wisdom and encouragement to get back to Artemis, BL. It's probably not the book but my mood as I've been having trouble "getting into" other books by authors I usually enjoy. I think I am just being a grouchy reader.

Edited to fix Touchstone.

110humouress
Dec 15, 2017, 12:22pm Top

>109 Storeetllr: I've got a similar problem. I started The Lies of Locke Lamora which is very nicely written - so far. However, apart from my general reading go-slow this year, I know that some LT readers had a difficult time with it, so I'm a bit wary about proceeding. Well, the kids finished school this week, so maybe I'll have more time to have another go at it.

111Storeetllr
Dec 15, 2017, 4:01pm Top

>110 humouress: I'm one of those who couldn't finish Lamora. :) Good luck and I hope you enjoy it because so many people loved it.

Right now, I'm reading a series (mystery, set in London) where most of the characters annoy the heck out of me, but the stories themselves, and the bits about London, its past, its architecture, its hidden rivers, have kept me going. So I guess I can overcome distaste for characters if the story, etc. grabs me. I'll probably get back to Artemis after the first of the new year.

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