HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
  • LibraryThing
  • Book discussions
  • Your LibraryThing
  • Join to start using.

Quilt Studies

Needlearts

Join LibraryThing to post.

1lesmel
Jun 19, 3:37pm Top

U of Nebraska-Lincoln has a quilt studies program (3 versions: thesis, non-thesis, distance education). I'd be tempted to apply except they charge out of state tuition for the distance ed...I find that ridiculous.

http://cehs.unl.edu/tmfd/ma-textile-historyquilt-studies-option-i/

Anyone aware of a similar program at another college/university?

2avaland
Jun 19, 4:36pm Top

That's fascinating...

3lesmel
Jun 19, 4:46pm Top

There's a certification option, as well.

The other thing that drives me batty about this program is this sentence:

Students with an undergraduate degree in history, art history, American studies, or women's studies are best prepared for this Graduate Certificate program.

Why women's studies? What does being a woman have to do with quilt making or quilt history...other than quilting is traditionally a woman's skill/hobby. I'm confused why a background in women's studies would be preparation for this textile history program.

4avaland
Jun 23, 5:30pm Top

>3 lesmel: Usually, I might one to jump on such assumptions, but I can see why they might look for that. It's because quilt history is intricately or intimately connected to women's history. Perhaps they prefer candidates who already have mastered the basics of women's studies (which is interdisiplinary) so that the focus can be more fine-tuned. It is a craft/art that has been practiced by women almost exclusively until the modern era. It's a big part of women's social and cultural history.

I have an English degree with minors in Art History (with a focus on women artists) and Women's Studies and I can see how my minors would segue nicely into the Masters program. Not sure I'm explaining it well. I'm sure they'd probably take anyone with a bachelors degree in any discipline if they were really interested.

5SassyLassy
Jul 10, 10:13am Top

>3 lesmel: Following up on what avaland said, that sentence would normally jump out at me too, but as she says, the link with women's history is strong, particularly for those with an interest in the "domestic arts" in an historical context, or in social history. Many books link these areas and quilting.

It looks like a good programme.

6lesmel
Jul 10, 11:11am Top

I'm still confused why women's studies is ideally suited for a textile history degree that is specifically designed for curation, care, education, and research. I totally get the connection between women and quilting, don't get me wrong; but there's nothing in the basic courseworks that screams "women's studies" to me.

History of Dress
Textiles, Technology, & Culture
Theory Development
Independent Study (this could have a women's studies component)
Museums: Theory & Practice
Quilts, History, & Culture
Master Thesis

I can see the "culture" part of the two courses having some women's studies focus...but again, I'm still not really seeing anything that says "having an understanding of interdisciplinary coursework that focuses on women will be a huge plus." Granted, the reaction is knee-jerk; but I'm still confused.

I contacted the program coordinator and asked for a list of required/suggested readings from some of the Special Topics courses they taught. Unfortunately, the coordinator wasn't super forthcoming.

In other news, I was looking at taking some basic art classes and there's not a single night class for art. I find that extremely weird for a city that has three community college systems and two major four-year universities.

7avaland
Jul 11, 8:35am Top

>6 lesmel: I sympathize about the art classes. That is the very reason I was talked out of a studio art major or minor -- because I would not be able to find night classes (which sadly was true at that time, although there is now an art museum offering some for credit). Are you just thinking of classes that offer college credit? Studio art or history/theory? If the latter, you might find some online.

I doubt it's available now, but I took a fabulous interdisciplinary class online from Skidmore college that merged art and science (topics like symmetry, phyllotaxis and chaos theory)...at one point we were asked to make something inspired by various photographs of bacteria and other microscopic entities.

Are you interested in the college credits or just your own enlightenment?

8lesmel
Jul 11, 9:53am Top

>7 avaland: Maybe a combo. That Quilt Studies program really calls to me. I can't imagine I would ever find the time to complete a program like that b/c of the on-campus requirement; but at the same time, why not combine what I'm interested in learning with some additional college credit in the hopes that maybe I could figure out how to complete that program?

I probably could find a couple podcasts or MOOCs or something on Design 2-D, Design 3-D, and Color if I just want to spend more time on developing my art skills.

9avaland
Edited: Jul 13, 8:28am Top


Who knows, you might be able to negotiate the on-campus part. Colleges are very money-orientated these days, and perhaps it means enough to them to make concessions. Of course, the cost for being out-of-state might be prohibitive...

Here's a free course on color theory: https://alison.com/course/colour-theory-for-artists-and-designers

10avaland
Jul 13, 4:08pm Top

I just noticed that "Great Courses" has a "Quilting Essentials" course that is on sale. It has quite a range of topics.

I'm currently listening to one of their courses on Utopias & dystopias which I got inexpensively used on Amazon. One night this one the same way.

Join to post

Group: Needlearts

361 members

6,293 messages

You must be a member of this group to post.

About

This topic is not marked as primarily about any work, author or other topic.

Touchstones

No touchstones

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,428,128 books! | Top bar: Always visible