HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
  • LibraryThing
  • Book discussions
  • Your LibraryThing
  • Join to start using.

Anita (FAMeulstee) goes where the books take her in 2019 (3)

75 Books Challenge for 2019

Join LibraryThing to post.

1FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 4:30am Top

Welcome to my third 2019 thread!

I am Anita Meulstee, married with Frank since 1984. We live in Lelystad, the Netherlands. We both love modern art and books.
I read (almost) everything, from childrens and YA books to more serious literature, mysteries, historical fiction, fantasy and I try not to forget to throw some non-fiction into the mix.

The first signs of spring in my garden:
  

2FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 1, 6:39am Top

total books read in 2019: 114
54 own / 59 library / 1 other

total pages read in 2019: 31,078 pages

--
books read in March 2019 (34 books, 10,829 pages, 13 own / 20 library / 1 other)
book 114: *Waar je bang voor bent (The Places That Scare You) by Pema Chödrön, 144 pages, TIOLI #8 (msg 205)
book 113: Vroeger was de aarde plat by Marten Toonder, 301 pages, TIOLI #5 (msg 204)
book 112: Doofpot (Decider) by Dick Francis, 264 pages, TIOLI #5 (msg 189)
book 111: Het roze huis by Pierre Bergounioux, 167 pages, TIOLI #14 (msg 187)
book 110: Middlemarch (Middlemarch) by George Eliot, 1019 pages, TIOLI #14 (msg 186)
book 109: Het schrift van Perle (The Book of Pearl) by Timothée de Fombelle, 336 pages, TIOLI #14 (msg 185)
book 108: Mijn haat krijgen jullie niet (You Will Not Have My Hate) by Antoine Leiris, 110 pages (msg 184)
book 107: Ik Jan Cremer (I, Jan Cremer) by Jan Cremer, 389 pages, TIOLI #14 (msg 183)
book 106: De ridderslag (Knight's Fee) by Rosemary Sutcliff, 224 pages, TIOLI #5 (msg 182)
book 105: Tweede persoon enkelvoud (Second Person Singular) by Sayed Kashua, 303 pages, TIOLI #12 (msg 181)
book 104: Het zevende gebod (The Leper's Return) by Michael Jecks, 317 pages (msg 156)
book 103: Een onberispelijke man (Old Filth) by Jane Gardam, 320 pages, TIOLI #8 (msg 155)
book 102: Een overtollig mens by J.M.A. Biesheuvel, 94 pages, TIOLI #4 (msg 154)
book 101: Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami, 317 pages, TIOLI #1 (msg 153)
book 100: Het eind van het verhaal (The End of the Story) by Lydia Davis, 249 pages, TIOLI #13 (msg 145)
book 99: Stormnacht (Storm Front) by Jim Butcher, 303 pages, TIOLI #9 (msg 144)
book 98: Dolende ridders op Verda by Hermann Molenkamp, 469 pages, TIOLI #12 (msg 127)
book 97: In de greep van de citroenzucht by Alet Schouten, 155 pages, TIOLI #1 (msg 126)
book 96: De gekwelde man (The Troubled Man) by Henning Mankell, 603 pages, TIOLI #4 (msg 125)
book 95: M. by Shira Keller, 144 pages, TIOLI #13 (msg 124)
book 94: *Laura's gedichten (Laura's Poems) by Laura Ranger, 65 pages, TIOLI #7 (msg 123)
book 93: De ijzeren engel (Clockwork angel) by Cassandra Clare, 464 pages, TIOLI #11 (msg 122)
book 92: Het teken van Wichart (Flight into Danger) by Alet Schouten, 160 pages (msg 106)
book 91: De dood van Winnetou by Karl May, 365 pages (msg 105)
book 90: Ademnood (Forfeit) by Dick Francis, 199 pages, TIOLI #6 (msg 104)
book 89: Het vuur (Under Fire) by Henri Barbusse, 427 pages, TIOLI #3 (msg 103)
book 88: Papillon by Henri Charrière, 508 pages, TIOLI #6 (msg 102)
book 87: Predikant (The Preacher) by Camilla Lackberg, 365 pages, TIOLI #6 (msg 101)
book 86: Radetzkymars (The Radetzky March) by Joseph Roth, 383 pages, TIOLI #2 (msg 100)
book 85: *Hoe gaat het met jou? Met mij gaat het goed by Liesbeth van Lennep, 91 pages, TIOLI #8 (msg 68)
book 84: Winnetou bij de bedoeïenen by Karl May, 288 pages (msg 67)
book 83: Alles stroomt (Everything flows) by Vasili Grossman, 224 pages, TIOLI #14 (msg 66)
book 82: De grote jacht (The Great Hunt, Wheel of time 2) by Robert Jordan, 735 pages, TIOLI #10 (msg 65)
book 81: Moordvrienden by Nele Neuhaus, 327 pages, TIOLI #8 (msg 64)

* these books are to be culled

3FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 1, 1:18pm Top

books read in February 2019 (42 books, 10,836 pages, 21 own / 21 library)
book 80: Een vlucht regenwulpen (Flight of Curlews) by Maarten 't Hart, 197 pages, TIOLI #4 (msg 48)
book 79: Wij zeggen hier niet halfbroer by Henk van Straten, 240 pages (msg 47)
book 78: Ik ben een held by Ted van Lieshout, 56 pages, TIOLI #7 (msg 46)
book 77: Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann, 579 pages, TIOLI #15 (msg 42)
book 76: Tonkie in de wildernis by Alet Schouten, 85 pages, TIOLI #7 (msg 41)
book 75: Verhaal van een leven 2 by Konstantin Paustovski, 506 pages, TIOLI #9 (msg 8)
book 74: Wallanders wereld by Henning Mankell, 313 pages, TIOLI #16
book 73: Dicht langs de huizen by Willem Wilmink, 52 pages, TIOLI #7
book 72: De rotsvesting in Sonora by Karl May, 358 pages, TIOLI #5
book 71: Fatalità (Fatal Remedies) by Donna Leon, 206 pages, TIOLI #4
book 70: *Kikker is een held (Frog is a hero) by Max Velthuijs, 32 pages, TIOLI #7
book 69: Nobilità (A Noble Radiance) by Donna Leon, 208 pages, TIOLI #16
book 68: Een stille dood (Quietly in Their Sleep) by Donna Leon, 220 pages, TIOLI #16
book 67: Verhalen uit de godenwereld van de Edda by Henk van Kerkwijk, 202 pages, TIOLI #4
book 66: De dragers van het Eikenblad (The Battle for Skandia, Ranger's Apprentice 4) by John Flanagan, 327 pages, TIOLI #7
book 65: Het ijzige land (The Icebound Land, Ranger's Apprentice 3) by John Flanagan, 324 pages, TIOLI #4
book 64: De brandende brug (The Burning Bridge, Ranger's Apprentice 2) by John Flanagan, 285 pages, TIOLI #6
book 63: Beenderhuis (A Room Full of Bones) by Elly Griffiths, 286 pages, TIOLI #16
book 62: Sterren en strepen (Notes from a Big Country) by Bill Bryson, 368 pages, TIOLI #11
book 61: *Mij 'n zorg (Adam and Eve and Pinch-me) by Julie Johnston, 243 pages, TIOLI #13
book 60: Springvloed (The House at Sea's End, Ruth Galloway 3) by Elly Griffiths, 301 pages, TIOLI #16
book 59: Parijs is een feest (A Moveable Feast) by Ernest Hemingway, 255 pages, TIOLI #3
book 58: *De sprookjes van Moeder de Gans (The Tales of Mother Goose) by Charles Perrault, 247 pages, TIOLI #5,
book 57: De leeuw van Vlaanderen (The Lion of Flanders) by Hendrik Conscience, 417 pages, TIOLI #7
book 56: De wet van staal (The Alloy of Law) by Brandon Sanderson, 317 pages, TIOLI #7
book 55: *Zaterdagmorgen, Zondagmorgen by Jacques Vriens, 72 pages, TIOLI #6
book 54: Offersteen (The Janus Stone, Ruth Galloway 2) by Elly Griffiths, 285 pages, TIOLI #16
book 53: *Zip en andere verhalen by Wim Hofman, 64 pages, TIOLI #4
book 52: Voor de vorst (Before the Frost, Wallander 9) by Henning Mankell, 539 pages, TIOLI #5
book 51: Een onbeminde vrouw by Nele Neuhaus, 314 pages, TIOLI #4
book 50: Jacques de fatalist en zijn meester (Jacques the fatalist) by Denis Diderot, 300 pages, TIOLI #5
book 49: De Cock en de dood in antiek by A.C. Baantjer, 140 pages, TIOLI #5
book 48: Het oog van de wereld (The Eye of the World, Wheel of Time 1) by Robert Jordan, 782 pages, TIOLI #4
book 47: De gouden ezel (The Golden Ass) by Apuleius, 367 pages, TIOLI #17
book 46: Het geheim van de keel van de nachtegaal by Peter Verhelst, 64 pages. TIOLI #10
book 45: *Een leeuw met lange tanden by Dolf Verroen, 69 pages, TIOLI #6
book 44: Een nieuw begin (New Spring, Wheel of Time prequel) by Robert Jordan, 350 pages, TIOLI #4
book 43: De ogen van Elisha (Toby and the Secrets of the Tree) by Timothe´e de Fombelle, 382 pages, TIOLI #9
book 42: Briefgeheim by Jan Terlouw, 124 pages, TIOLI #3
book 41: Mijn botjes zijn bekleed met deftig vel by Ted van Lieshout, 32 pages, TIOLI #6
book 40: Waar is de taart? (Where Is the Cake?) by Thé Tjong-Khing, 26 pages, TIOLI #1
book 39: Het Achterhuis (The Diary of a Young Girl) by Anne Frank, 302 pages, TIOLI #12

books read in January 2019 (38 books, 9,413 pages, 20 own / 18 library)
book 38: De ondergrondse spoorweg (The underground railroad) by Colson Whitehead
book 37: *Zenuwmoord (Nerve) by Dick Francis
book 36: Een stap en dan de volgende by Pierre Bergounioux
book 35: Een mond vol dons (A Mouthful of Feathers) by Lydia Rood
book 34: *Het verhaal van Bobbel (The Story of Bobble Who Wanted to Be Rich) by Joke van Leeuwen
book 33: De smokkelaars van de Tigris by Karl May
book 32: Een schrijver in oorlog (A Writer at War) by Vasili Grossman
book 31: De ruïnes van Gorlan (The Ruins of Gorlan, Ranger's Apprentice 1) by John Flanagan
book 30: Er zijn nog 17 miljoen wachtenden voor u by Sander Heijne
book 29: Op de vlucht (Toby Alone) by Timothe´e de Fombelle
book 28: *Het Oerlanderboek (Legacy of Magic) by Leonie Kooiker
book 27: Een muur van schilden (The Shield Ring) by Rosemary Sutcliff
book 26: *Barst by Boris Dittrich
book 25: IJsprinses (The Ice Princess) by Camilla Läckberg
book 24: Ik ben Polleke hoor! (I am Polleke) by Guus Kuijer
book 23: *Tin Toeval en de kunst van Madelief by Guus Kuijer
book 22: De erfenis van de Tempeliers (The Templar Legacy) by Steve Berry
book 21: Zomer van de vriendschap (Ostend: Stefan Zweig, Joseph Roth, and the Summer Before the Dark) by Volker Weidermann
book 20: Het wonderlijke verhaal van Angelino Brown (The Tale of Angelino Brown) by David Almond
book 19: De toverberg (The Magic Mountain) by Thomas Mann
book 18: *De tijdkring (Mr Was) by Pete Hautman
book 17: Het rechte pad (The Heretic's Apprentice, Cadfael 16) by Ellis Peters
book 16: Broere (Brothers) by Bart Moeyaert
book 15: De onbekende ridder (The Mystery Knight, Dunk & Egg 3) by George R.R. Martin
book 14: Ongebaande paden by Sylvain Tesson
book 13: *En straks komt Emilio by Gudrun Pausewang
book 12: *Ik ben Joshua en mijn vader is een held (Piggy in the middle) by Jan Michael
book 11: De slag op de Heckingse Heide (The Battle of Hackham Heath, Ranger's Apprentice prequel 2) by John Flanagan
book 10: Muren van alle tijden by Fik Meijer
book 9: Het toernooi van Gorlan (The Tournament at Gorlan, Ranger's Apprentice prequel 1) by John Flanagan
book 8: Een dodelijk venijn (Adamsberg 9) by Fred Vargas
book 7: De show van je leven (I Am Half-Sick of Shadows) by Alan Bradley
book 6: Deesje by Joke van Leeuwen
book 5: Twee ons liefde by Ted van Lieshout
book 4: Afscheid van een koning (The Road to Camlann) by Rosemary Sutcliff
book 3: Schild en kruis (The Light Beyond the Forest) by Rosemary Sutcliff
book 2: Zwaard en kroon (The Sword and the Circle) by Rosemary Sutcliff
book 1: IJsmoord (A Climate of Fear, Adamsberg 8) by Fred Vargas

* these books are to be culled

4FAMeulstee
Edited: Sep 27, 5:17pm Top



TIOLI February: 41 books read
#1: Read a book whose title appropriately captions the posted hamster picture
Waar is de taart? (Where Is the Cake?) - Thé Tjong-Khing
#2: Read a book which has the word "library" or "lover" somewhere within the first 5 chapters
#3: Read a book by an author who has written both fiction and nonfiction books
Briefgeheim - Jan Terlouw
Parijs is een feest (A Moveable Feast) - Ernest Hemingway
#4: Read a book that was published at least 10 years ago
Een nieuw begin (New Spring) - Robert Jordan
Een onbeminde vrouw - Nele Neuhaus
Een vlucht regenwulpen (Flight of Curlews) - Maarten 't Hart
Fatalità (Fatal Remedies) - Donna Leon
Het oog van de wereld (The Eye of the World) - Robert Jordan
Het ijzige land (The Icebound Land) - John Flanagan
Verhalen uit de godenwereld van de Edda - Henk van Kerkwijk
Zip en andere verhalen - Wim Hofman
#5: Read a turn-of-the-century book
De Cock en de dood in antiek - A.C. Baantjer
De rotsvesting in Sonora - Karl May
De sprookjes van Moeder de Gans (The Tales of Mother Goose) - Charles Perrault
Jacques de fatalist en zijn meester (Jacques the fatalist) - Denis Diderot
Voor de vorst (Before the Frost) - Henning Mankell
#6: Read a book whose title includes at least two 4+ letter words starting with the same letter
De brandende brug (The Burning Bridge) - John Flanagan
Een leeuw met lange tanden - Dolf Verroen
Mijn botjes zijn bekleed met deftig vel - Ted van Lieshout
Zaterdagmorgen, Zondagmorgen - Jacques Vriens
#7: Read a book with a four word title
De dragers van het Eikenblad (The Battle for Skandia) - John Flanagan
De leeuw van Vlaanderen (The Lion of Flanders) - Hendrik Conscience
De wet van staal (The Alloy of Law) - Brandon Sanderson
Dicht langs de huizen - Willem Wilmink
Ik ben een held - Ted van Lieshout
Kikker is een held (Frog is a hero) - Max Velthuijs
Tonkie in de wildernis - Alet Schouten
#8: Read a book about news reporting. (Please state which media type)
#9: Read a book where the chapters have titles. (Please give the title of the first chapter)
De ogen van Elisha (Toby and the Secrets of the Tree) - Timothée de Fombelle
Verhaal van een leven 2 - Konstantin Paustovski
#10: Read a book whose title makes you break into song. (Please list the song)
Het geheim van de keel van de nachtegaal - Peter Verhelst
#11: Read a book whose cover has an image relating to the sea
Sterren en strepen (Notes from a Big Country) - Bill Bryson
#12: Read a book where the title refers to a woman
Het Achterhuis (The Diary of a Young Girl) - Anne Frank
#13: Read a book about a bad mother
Mij 'n zorg (Adam and Eve and Pinch-me) - Julie Johnston
#14: Read a book that begins with a one-sentence paragraph
#15: Read a book for the Marvel comic character alphabetical rolling challenge
Doctor Faustus (Doctor Faustus) - Thomas Mann
#16: Read a work by an author you read in 2018
Beenderhuis (A Room Full of Bones) - Elly Griffiths
Een stille dood (Quietly in Their Sleep) - Donna Leon
Nobilità (A Noble Radiance) - Donna Leon
Offersteen (The Janus Stone) - Elly Griffiths
Springvloed (The House at Sea's End) - Elly Griffiths
Wallanders wereld - Henning Mankell
#17: Read a book which was listed by the same challenger who started any of the previous February TIOLI challenges
De gouden ezel (The Golden Ass) - Apuleius
#18: Read a book featuring clothing

--
TIOLI March 2019: 30 books read, a TIOLI sweep on 16/3
#1: Read a book whose title starts with the last letter of the author's last name of the preceding book
Norwegian Wood - Haruki Murakami
In de greep van de citroenzucht - Alet Schouten
#2: Read a book where the author or a character has the name of "Joe" or a variation thereof
Radetzkymars (The Radetzky March) - Joseph Roth
#3: Read a book that is in the "Recommended" section on your home page (either LT or member)
Het vuur (Under Fire) - Henri Barbusse
#4: Read a book that starts with a quote for the semi-rolling alphabet challenge (list under quote)
De gekwelde man (The Troubled Man) - Henning Mankell
Een overtollig mens - J.M.A. Biesheuvel
#5: ROLLING CHALLENGE: Read a book with a significant connection to the countries of the United Kingdom (no skipping)
De ridderslag (Knight's Fee) - Rosemary Sutcliff
Doofpot (Decider) - Dick Francis
Het teken van Wichart (Flight into Danger) - Alet Schouten
Vroeger was de aarde plat - Marten Toonder
#6: Read a book somebody else picked for you (list who picked)
Ademnood (Forfeit) - Dick Francis
Papillon (Papillon) - Henri Charrière
Predikant (The Preacher) - Camilla Läckberg
#7: Read a book of poetry
Laura's gedichten (Laura's Poems) - Laura Ranger
#8: Read a book by a woman who is born in the 20th century
Een onberispelijke man (Old Filth) - Jane Gardam
Hoe gaat het met jou ? Met mij gaat het goed - Liesbeth van Lennep
Moordvrienden - Nele Neuhaus
Waar je bang voor bent (The Places That Scare You) - Pema Chödrön
#9: Read a book with a job/occupation in the title or author's name
Stormnacht (Storm Front) - Jim Butcher
#10: Read a book that completes this sentence: (Title of Book) is/are complete madness!
De grote jacht (The Great Hunt) - Robert Jordan
#11: Read a book of alternate history written by a woman
De ijzeren engel (Clockwork angel) - Cassandra Clare
#12: Read a book you had to wait for
Dolende ridders op Verda - Hermann Molenkamp
Tweede persoon enkelvoud (Second Person Singular)- Sayed Kashua
#13: Read a book where you find an article of clothing in the first sentence and so get fully dressed
M. - Shira Keller
Het eind van het verhaal (The End of the Story) - Lydia Davis
#14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)
Alles stroomt (Everything Flows) - Vasili Grossman
Het roze huis - Pierre Bergounioux
Het schrift van Perle (The Book of Pearl) - Timothée de Fombelle
Ik Jan Cremer (I, Jan Cremer) - Jan Cremer
Middlemarch (Middlemarch) - George Eliot

--
TIOLI books read between 2010 and 2018: 960
TIOLI books read in 2019: 108

5FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 17, 7:31pm Top



Reading plans in 2019

I have a large collection of mostly awarded childrens & YA books. At the moment I am reading the books I haven't read since joining LT, mostly alphabeticly, to decide which to keep.
I start in 2019 with 579 childrens/YA books on the shelves, of those 111 are TBR.

End of January update own childrens/YA books project:
16 books read, 2 books added, 6 books culled, new total 575 books on the shelves, 97 TBR

End of February update own childrens/YA books project:
15 books read, 8 books culled, new total 567 books on the shelves, 82 TBR

--
I keep trying to read more of my own books, of the 534 books I have read in 2018 365 (67%) were my own.
This year I try to read at least 50% books of my own.

I join the TIOLI (Take It Or Leave It) challenges each month.

--
Monthly statistics
My readings in January 2019 in numbers
My readings in February 2019 in numbers

--
Previous threads in 2019
Book 1 - 25: thread 1
Book 26 - 74: thread 2
--
My readings in previous years
534 books (111,906 pages) read in 2018/1, 2018/2, 2018/3, 2018/4, 2018/5, 2018/6, 2018/7, 2018/8, 2018/9, 2018/10, 2018/11, 2018/12, 2018/13
453 books (110,222 pages) read in 2017/1, 2017/2, 2017/3, 2017/4, 2017/5, 2017/6, 2017/7, 2017/8, 2017/9, 2017/10, 2017/11, 2017/12, 2017/13
252 books   (72,474 pages) read in 2016/1, 2016/2, 2016/3, 2016/4, 2016/5, 2016/6
  29 books   (10,079 pages) read in 2015
  17 books     (3,700 pages) read in 2014
  13 books     (3,692 pages) read in ROOT 2013
  53 books   (18,779 pages) read in 2012/1, 2012/2, 2012/3
  84 books   (29,387 pages) read in 2011/1, 2011/2
121 books   (37,668 pages) read in 2010/1, 2010/2, 2010/3, 2010/4
  78 books   (22,698 pages) read in 2009/1, 2009/2
130 books   (39,901 pages) read in 2008

--
Other lists
My best of lists on the WikiThing

6FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 1, 9:03am Top



Series I read, a list to keep track

Bernie Gunther by Philip Kerr 4/12
1 Een Berlijnse kwestie; 2 Het handwerk van de beul; 3 Een Duits requiem; 4 De een van de ander; 5 Een stille vlam; 6 Als de doden niet herrijzen; 7 Grijs verleden; 8 Praag fataal; 9 De man zonder adem; 10 De vrouw van Zagreb; 11 De schaduw van de stilte; 12 Pruisisch blauw

Broeder Cadfael by Ellis Peters 7/20
1 Het heilige vuur; 2 Het laatste lijk; 3 Het gemene gewas; 4 De kwade knecht; 5 De eenzame bruid; 6 De kille maagd; 7 Het vege lijf; 8 De duivelse droom; 9 De gouden speld; 10 Een wisse dood; 11 Een hard gelag; 12 De ware aard; 13 Een witte roos; 14 Het stille woud; 15 De laatste eer; 16 Het rechte pad; 17 Een zijden haar; 18 Een lieve lust; 19 De heilige dief; 20 De verloren zoon

De Cock by A.C. Baantjer 51/70

Cormoran Strike by Robert Galbraith 3/4
1 Koekoeksjong; 2 Zijderups; 3 Het slechte pad; 4 Witte dood

Erica Falck & Patrik Hedström by Camilla Läckberg 2/10
1 IJsprinses; 2 Predikant; 3 Steenhouwer; 4 Zusje; 5 Oorlogskind; 6 Zeemeermin; 7 Vuurtorenwachter; 8 Engeleneiland; 9 Leeuwentemmer; 10 Heks

Flavia de Luce by Alan Bradley 4/5
1 De smaak van venijn; 2 Het stroeve touw; 3 De kunst van het liegen; 4 De show van je leven; 5 Slotakkoord voor een moord

De Grijze Jager (Ranger's Apprentice) by John Flanagan 6/15
0.1 Het toernooi van Gorlan; 0.2 De slag op de Heckingse heide; 1 De ruïnes van Gorlan; 2 De brandende brug; 3 Het ijzige land; 4 De dragers van het Eikenblad; 5 De magier van Macindaw; 6 Het beleg van Macindaw; 7 Losgeld voor Erak; 8 De koning van Clonmel; 9 Halt in gevaar; 10 De keizer van Nihon-Ja; 11 De verloren verhalen; 12 De koninklijke leerling; 13 De clan van de Rode Vos

Guido Brunetti by Donna Leon 8/25
1 Dood van een maestro; 2 Dood in den vreemde; 3 De dood draagt rode schoenen; 4 Salto mortale; 5 Acqua alta; 6 Een stille dood; 7 Nobiltà; 8 Fatalità; 9 Vriendendienst; 10 Onrustig tij; 11 Bedrieglijke zaken; 12 De stille elite; 13 Verborgen bewijs; 14 Vertrouwelijke zaken; 15 Duister glas; 16 Kinderspel; 17 Droommeisje; 18 Gezichtsverlies; 19 Een kwestie van vertrouwen; 20 Dodelijke conclusies; 21 Beestachtige zaken; 22 Het onbekende kind; 23 Tussen de regels; 24 Ik aanbid je; 25 Eeuwige jeugd; 26 Wat niet verdwijnt

Jean-Baptiste Adamsberg by Fred Vargas 9/9

John Rebus by Ian Rankin 2/18
1 Kat & muis; 2 Blindeman; 3 Hand & Tand; 4 Ontmaskering; 5 Zwartboek; 6 Vuurwerk; 7 Laat maar bloeden; 8 Gerechtigheid; 9 Door het lint; 10 Dode zielen; 11 In het duister; 12 Valstrik; 13 Lazarus; 14 Een kwestie van bloed; 15 De rechtelozen; 16 Gedenk de doden; 17 Laatste ronde; 18 Cold case;

Konrad Sejer by Karin Fossum 4/12
1 Eva's oog; 2 Kijk niet achterom; 3 Wie de wolf vreest; 4 De duivel draagt het licht; 5 De Indiase bruid; 6 Zwarte seconden; 7 De moord op Harriet Krohn; 8 Een andere voorkeur; 9 Kwade wil; 10 De waarschuwer; 11 Carmen Zita og døden (not translated); 12 Veenbrand; 13 De fluisteraar

Kurt Wallander by Henning Mankell 12/12

Martin Beck by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö 3/10
1 De vrouw in het Götakanaal; 2 De man die in rook opging; 3 De man op het balkon; 4 De lachende politieman; 5 De brandweerauto die verdween; 6 De man die even wilde afrekenen; 7 De verschrikkelijke man uit Säffle; 8 De gesloten kamer; 9 De politiemoordenaar; 10 De terroristen

Nic Costa by David Hewson 6/11
1 De Vaticaanmoorden; 2 Het Bacchus offer; 3 De Pantheon getuige; 4 De engelen des doods; 5 Het zevende sacrament; 6 De Romeinse lusthof; 7 Het masker van Dante; 8 Blauwe demonen; 9 Gevallen engel; 10 Dans van de doden; 11 De binnenste cirkel

Oliver von Bodenstein & Pia Kirchhoff by Nele Neuhaus 2/8
1 Een onbeminde vrouw; 2 Moordvrienden; 3 Diepe wonden; 4 Sneeuwwitje moet sterven; 5 Wie wind zaait; 6 Boze wolf; 7 De levenden en de doden; 8 Het woud

Het rad des tijds (Wheel of Time) by Robert Jordan (and Brandon Sanderson) 3/15
0 Een nieuw begin; 1 Het oog van de wereld; 2 De grote jacht; 3 De herrezen draak; 4 De komst van de schaduw; 5 Vuur uit de hemel; 6 Heer van chaos; 7 Een kroon van zwaarden; 8 Het pad der dolken; 9 Hart van de Winter; 10 Viersprong van de schemer; 11 Mes van Dromen; 12 De naderende storm; 13 De Torens van Middernacht; 14 Het licht van weleer

Ruth Galloway by Elly Griffiths 4/4

Sir Baldwin by Michael Jecks 6/8
1 De laatste tempelridder; 2 De heks van Wefford; 3 De gehangene van Dartmoor; 4 Het mooie lijk; 5 Het lijk zonder hoofd; 6 Het zevende gebod; 7 De dood van de erfgenaam; 8 Moord in het klooster

7FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 5, 4:23am Top



Books acquired in 2019: 35

March 2019 (20)
Vuur van Brigid en andere wintermythen by Pierre Michon
De blauwe jurk van Camille by Michèle Desbordes
Jas van belofte by Jan Siebelink (bookweek gift)
Mijn moeders strijd by Murat Isik (bookweek)
Vonkt by Marije Langelaar
Niemandslandnacht by Annemarie Estor
Exit geest by Philp Roth
Serotonine by Michel Houellebecq
Vriendendienst by Donna Leon (e-book)
Onrustig tij by Donna Leon (e-book)
Bedrieglijke zaken by Donna Leon (e-book)
Doem en dorst by Albert Besnard
Nog pas gisteren by Maria Dermoût
Klein t(er)reurspel by Jan Elburg
Zonder dansmeester by Jozef Eyckmans
Het innerlijk behang en andere gedichten by Hans Lodeizen
Going my way by Michiel van der Plas
Ik was getrouwd met een communist by Philip Roth
Werelden by Nes Tergast
Met het oog op morgen by Bert Voeten

February 2019 (4)
De Vaticaanmoorden - David Hewson (e-book)
Het Bacchus offer - David Hewson (e-book)
De Pantheon getuige - David Hewson (e-book)
De engelen des doods - David Hewson (e-book)

January 2019 (11)
De vrouw van Toulmond - Wim van Til
Grand Hotel Europa - Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer
De vernedering - Philip Roth
Hoe Tortot zijn vissenhart verloor - Benny Lindelauf
Nieuwe maan - Sarah Crossan
Zenuwmoord - Dick Francis
Inbreuk - Dick Francis
Op hol - Dick Francis
Een stille dood (Guido Brunetti 6) - Donna Leon
Nobiltà (Guido Brunetti 7) - Donna Leon
Fatalità (Guido Brunetti 8) - Donna Leon

--
Books culled in 2019: 0 (really gone) + 23 (ready to go) = 23

8FAMeulstee
Edited: Feb 24, 8:14am Top



book 75: Verhaal van een leven 2 by Konstantin Paustovski
own, memoires, translated from Russian, Russische Bibliotheek, English translation In That Dawn and Years of Hope, 506 pages
TIOLI Challenge #9: Read a book where the chapters have titles

Book three and four of The story of a life, the memoires of Konstantin Paustovski.

In book three Paustovsky describes his days in Moscow during the October Revolution. After receiving a letter from his mother he travels to Kiev, in the midst of civil war between the Red Army and the White Army. From there he goes to Odessa, that is still in the hands of the White Army, where he will stay for some years.

In book four Paustovsky starts working for a Soviet paper for sailors in 1920, after the Red Army took Odessa. There he meets the writer Isaac Babel. In this book it felt sometimes he wrote knowing censors would read along.
With references to Henri Barbusse's Under Fire and Isaac Babel's Red Cavalry, planning to read those soon.

Impressive read.

9FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 4:59am Top

That's it, thread is open!

10Ameise1
Feb 24, 5:01am Top

Congrats on reaching 75. I love the spring flower topper. Hapyy Sunday.

11Caroline_McElwee
Feb 24, 5:08am Top

I love that Spring has sprung in your garden Anita.

12FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 5:11am Top

>10 Ameise1: Thank you, Barbara, for being the first visitor of my new thread. Happy Sunday to you!

>11 Caroline_McElwee: Thank you, Caroline, more warm and sunny weather to come. I even saw some other bulbs coming up.

13Caroline_McElwee
Feb 24, 5:13am Top

And 75 books already Anita, incredible (I've hit 17).

14FAMeulstee
Edited: Feb 24, 5:49am Top

>13 Caroline_McElwee: Thank you, Caroline. This is the first time I got to 75 in February.
The agoraphobia kept me mostly housebound, so I had more time to read.

15charl08
Feb 24, 7:05am Top

Book 75! Wow! Congratulations.

Love your Spring pictures. I've brought some flowers from Port Sunlight.

16Carmenere
Feb 24, 7:08am Top

Happy new thread, Anita! I'm totally amazed when I see you've got flowers breaking through the soil. Our crocus won't pop out till mid March, at the earliest. Must be in the wind stream ;0)

17paulstalder
Feb 24, 8:04am Top

Happy new thread

18figsfromthistle
Edited: Feb 24, 8:19am Top

Happy new thread, Anita!

Also, congrats on reaching 75 books (already) !!!

19scaifea
Feb 24, 8:34am Top

Happy new thread, Anita!

20karenmarie
Feb 24, 9:53am Top

Happy new thread, Anita, and congratulations on book 75 so early in the year!

Wishing you a lovely rest of the weekend.

21jnwelch
Feb 24, 10:25am Top

Happy New Thread, Anita!

Lovely photos of the spring flowers in your garden.

Congratulations on reading 75 books already!

22FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 10:54am Top

>15 charl08: Thank you, Charlotte, I am early this year :-)
Lovely colored crocusses, spring has arrived at our places.

>16 Carmenere: Thank you, Lynda. It is not unusual over here to see the first bulbs flowering in February, even sometimes at the start of the month after a very mild winter.

>17 paulstalder: Thank you, Paul.

>18 figsfromthistle: Thank you twice, Anita! I have never reached 75 so early.

>19 scaifea: Thank you, Amber!

>20 karenmarie: Thank you, Karen, the books are good to me.
The weather is nice, sunny and dry, so I worked a bit in the garden. The weeds like the early spring too ;-)

>21 jnwelch: Thank you, Joe, it makes me happy to see some color back in the garden.
I am still reading a lot and enjoying most books I read.

23streamsong
Feb 24, 11:06am Top

Happy new thread and thank you for sharing your lovely spring flowers!

I'm glad you are enjoying your garden, your books and even taking a walk by yourself.

May you have many more sunny days!

24FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 11:43am Top

>23 streamsong: Thank you, Janet, it looks like we have some more nice days ahead. Today I spotted some tulip leaves coming up.
Closing LT now, to do a walk together with Frank.

25paulstalder
Feb 24, 11:49am Top

and thanks for the spring flowers :)

26foggidawn
Feb 24, 2:11pm Top

Congratulations on reaching 75 already, and happy new thread!

27harrygbutler
Feb 24, 2:47pm Top

Happy new thread, Anita, and congratulations on hitting 75 so early in the year!

28FAMeulstee
Feb 24, 7:02pm Top

>25 paulstalder: You are welcome, Paul :-)

>26 foggidawn: Thank you, Foggi, reading is still going strong.

>27 harrygbutler: Thank you, Harry, I almost get used to reading so much ;-)

29drneutron
Feb 24, 9:14pm Top

Congrats and happy new thread!

30msf59
Feb 24, 9:17pm Top

Happy New Thread, Anita. And congrats on hitting 75! Our magic number. I hope you had a good weekend.

31PaulCranswick
Feb 24, 10:18pm Top

Happy new thread, Anita.

Congratulations on 75 books already --------you do realise that it is still only February?!

32FAMeulstee
Feb 25, 10:24am Top

>29 drneutron: Thank you, Jim!

>30 msf59: Thank you, Mark. I had a good weekend, but worked a bit much in the garden, now my back is complaining...

>31 PaulCranswick: Thank you, Paul. Yes, I know, it just sort of happened.
Theoretical even reaching 75 in January is possible, last December I totalled at 90+ books. But I started slow (actually, I had to recuperate from the December reading) ;-)

33richardderus
Feb 25, 3:46pm Top

34johnsimpson
Feb 25, 4:30pm Top

Happy new thread Anita my dear, I cannot believe you have already hit the 75 target. I am so sorry about your friend my dear, it is never nice losing someone. I hope you are feeling a little better dear friend and send love and hugs to you and to Frank from both of us.

35FAMeulstee
Feb 25, 5:36pm Top

>33 richardderus: Thank you, Richard, celebration early in the year :-)

>34 johnsimpson: Thank you, John! It surprised me as well, last two years I hit the target in March, and the years before that much later in the year or not at all.
The world is a bit emptier without Rob, good friends are rare and he was one of them.
I am doing a bit better and will be fine again eventually. Love and hugs to you and Karen.

36EllaTim
Feb 25, 5:45pm Top

Congratulations on reaching your 75 books read! On to the next batch of 75!

Love your spring flowers up there.

37SirThomas
Feb 26, 2:32am Top

Happy new thread, Anita.
75 books! What an achievement - Congratulations.
I was proud of 75 posts - so everyone has his goals ;-).
I love your pictures, spring is coming - yay.
Best wishes and sunny days - inside and outside.

38FAMeulstee
Feb 26, 9:01am Top

>36 EllaTim: Thank you, Ella, I won't stop reading :-)
How is your allotment now spring has arrived?

>37 SirThomas: Thank you, Thomas, we are both happy with a goal reached ;-)
We have unusual warm record breaking weather, after tomorrow we go back to more normal temperatures.
Wishing you a lovely Tuesday.

39sirfurboy
Feb 26, 9:32am Top

Congratulations on 75 books Anita.

40FAMeulstee
Feb 26, 4:18pm Top

>39 sirfurboy: Thank you, Stephen.

41FAMeulstee
Feb 27, 3:49am Top


book 76: Tonkie in de wildernis by Alet Schouten
own, Dutch, YA, no translations, 85 pages
TIOLI Challenge #7: Read a book with a four word title

Sweet story about an abandoned cat, that is left in the middle of nowhere. With help of a wild cat and a jackdaw she finds a place to live near a mental hospital.

I am a fan of Alet Schouten, but I prefer her historical fiction.

42FAMeulstee
Edited: Feb 27, 4:06am Top


book 77: Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann
1001 books, own, translated from German, English translation Doctor Faustus, 579 pages
TIOLI Challenge #15: Read a book for the Marvel comic character alphabetical rolling challenge

The fictional biography of the composer Adrian Leverkuhn, told by his friend Serenus Zeitblom.
There is so much in this book, musical theory (sometimes a bit over my head), theology, the Faust legend, the rise of Hitler and his defeat, paralels to the life if Nietzsche, in some ways autobiographical etc.

I found it a bit harder to read than The Magic Moutain, that I read in January, still a very good book by a great writer.

43Caroline_McElwee
Feb 27, 5:17am Top

>42 FAMeulstee: I read this years ago Anita, and remember really liking it. Another one to add to the reread pile!

44Ameise1
Feb 28, 3:44am Top

Sweet Thursday, Anita. I enjoy sitting in the garden. It's warm and sunny.

45FAMeulstee
Feb 28, 6:29am Top

>43 Caroline_McElwee: I have Goethe's Faust on the shelves, Caroline, so I might come back to Doctor Faustus after reading that one.

>44 Ameise1: Thank you, Barbara, enjoy the weather as long as it lasts! The weather here is back to more normal temperatures. Still good enough to do some work in the garden, but not warm enough to sit there.

46FAMeulstee
Edited: Feb 28, 6:44am Top


book 78: Ik ben een held by Ted van Lieshout
own, Dutch, YA, awarded, Vlag en Wimpel 1991, no translations, 56 pages
TIOLI Challenge #7: Read a book with a four word title

Three lovely, illustrated, fairytale-like, short stories, where the brave son rescues his father from danger or fear.

The title translates "I am a hero".

47FAMeulstee
Feb 28, 7:05am Top


book 79: Wij zeggen hier niet halfbroer by Henk van Straten
from the library, Dutch, awarded, Dioraphte Jongerenliteratuur prijs 2018, no translations, 240 pages

Memories of the disjointed childhood of the author, he grew up with three older half-brothers in the house of their father. He feels disconnected with the world around. Reaching adolesence he discovered drugs and used them to escape the world.

Most of the book contains disjointed memories, anecdotes you would tell to brag to your friends, or the kind you share with family on a gathering. I only enjoyed the last part of the book.

The title translates "We don't say half-brother".

48FAMeulstee
Edited: Feb 28, 7:34am Top


book 80: Een vlucht regenwulpen by Maarten 't Hart
1001 books, own, Dutch, Dutch Canon, English translation Flight of Curlews, 197 pages
TIOLI Challenge #4: Read a book that was published at least 10 years ago

Maarten grew up as only child on the horticultural farm of his parents, growing fruits and vegetables. He rarely left the place until he had to go to school. He could learn very well, but never connected to others. Now he is an international known cell-biologist. He had a strong bond with his mother, who died of cancer. His mothers cancer made him decide to study cells, hoping he would find a cure someday. He fell in love once, at high school, af first he didn't dare to approach the girl, later he found out she already had a boyfriend. She stays in his mind as unreachable ideal.

Like many books by Maarten 't Hart, the main character has some autobiographical sides: his name, the orthodox christian upbringing, his love for birding and the study of biology at the university of Leiden.

49FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 31, 5:04am Top

February 2019 in numbers

42 books read (10,836 pages, 387.0 pages a day)

own 21 (50 %) / library 21

32 male author / 10 female author
17 originally written in Dutch / 25 translated into Dutch
38 fiction / 4 non-fiction

41 books in TIOLI Challenges
12 e-books
  6 1001 books (total 113)
  2 Dutch Literary Canon (total 22/125)
19 childrens/YA
10 mystery/police prodedural

longest book 782 pages
shortest book 32 pages
average book 258 pages

--
own books on the shelf since:
before 2008: 16
2008: 1
2018: 1
2019: 3

--
date first published:
2nd century: 1
17th century: 1
18th century: 1
19th century: 2

20th century
1940s: 2
1950s: 1
1960s: 1
1970s: 2
1980s: 6
1990s: 10

21st century:
2000s: 10
2010s: 5

--
ratings:
  2 x
  3 x
16 x
16 x
  5 x

--
Best books in February


Verhaal van een leven 2 by Konstantin Paustovski
Mijn botjes zijn bekleed met deftig vel by Ted van Lieshout


Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann
De wet van staal (The Alloy of Law) by Brandon Sanderson
De ogen van Elisha (Toby and the Secrets of the Tree) by Timothée de Fombelle

50FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 31, 5:04am Top

2019 totals to date:

80 books read (20,249 pages, 343.2 pages a day)

own 41 (51 %) / library 39

56 male author / 24 female author
28 originally written in Dutch / 52 translated into Dutch
71 fiction / 9 non-fiction

78 books in TIOLI Challenges
24 e-books
  7 1001 books (total 113)
  2 Dutch Literary Canon (total 22/125)
40 childrens/YA
18 mystery/police prodedural

longest book 972 pages
shortest book 32 pages
average book 253 pages

--
own books on the shelf since:
before 2008: 30
2008: 2
2009: 1
2017: 1
2018: 3
2019: 4

--
date first published:
2nd century: 1
17th century: 1
18th century: 1
19th century: 3

20th century
1920s: 1
1940s: 2
1950s: 2
1960s: 2
1970s: 5
1980s: 13
1990s: 13

21st century:
2000s: 18
2010s: 18

--
ratings:
  3 x
  8 x
28 x
28 x
13 x

51The_Hibernator
Edited: Feb 28, 11:03am Top

Happy New Thread!

52Morphidae
Feb 28, 9:57pm Top

>1 FAMeulstee: Love the flowers! Spring is still a good four to six weeks away here in Minnesota, USA.

53EllaTim
Mar 1, 3:47am Top

February was a good reading month, again, Anita.

I should try Thomas Mann, you seem to like him!

My allotment is showing spring signs as well. We're still pruning, alder trees have to be cut back a bit. So lots of pollen and sneezing going on.

54fuzzi
Edited: Mar 1, 7:40am Top

We have Spring making a valiant attempt to not just show up but STAY here: the frogs have been singing every night and laying eggs though the morning temperature hovers near freezing. I also have daffodils, crocus, grape hyacinth, and camellias blooming.

55karenmarie
Mar 1, 8:01am Top

Hi Anita, and happy Friday to you!

>42 FAMeulstee: I have Magic Mountain on my shelves, unread, but not Doctor Faustus. I’ll keep an eye peeled for it. It sounds like a wonderful and challenging read.

>49 FAMeulstee: and >50 FAMeulstee: Wonderful stats!

56nittnut
Mar 1, 11:40am Top

Congratulations on hitting 75! Amazing.

57richardderus
Mar 1, 1:07pm Top

>50 FAMeulstee: I'm delighted for you that there were two five-star reads in February, and not a little awed that you're over 75 already.

Happy weekend!

58ChelleBearss
Mar 1, 6:34pm Top

Happy new thread and happy 75 already!!

>1 FAMeulstee: I wish we had some signs of spring here instead of snow :(

59FAMeulstee
Mar 2, 6:27pm Top

>51 The_Hibernator: Thank you, Rachel!

>52 Morphidae: Spring is a bit early this year, Morphy, I hope is arrives soon at your place.

>53 EllaTim: Yes it was a good reading month, Ella :-)
I think The Buddenbrooks is a bit easier to read than the other two, might be a good one to start.
Frank also suffers from the pollen, I suffer from weeds coming up faster than I can remove them.

>54 fuzzi: I haven't heard the frogs yet, Fuzzi. My camelia suffered from the drought last summer, it is alive, but no flowers this year.

>55 karenmarie: Thank you, Karen, almost time to wish you a happy Monday ;-)
Both The Magic Mountain and Doctor Faustus were challanging reads, I liked the fist a wee bit better.
The first months have been good reading months, partly due to the agoraphobia returning, which kept me more house bound.

>56 nittnut: Thank you, Jenn!

>57 richardderus: Thank you, Richard dear. It makes me happy when I discover new gems in reading. On to the next 75, with hopefully a few 5* reads again!

>58 ChelleBearss: Thank you, Chelle!
I hope spring finds your place soon.

60Caroline_McElwee
Mar 2, 7:17pm Top

>59 FAMeulstee: I liked Louis Couperus' quartet The Book of Small Souls better than Buddenbrooks. It might be time for a reread of that this year Anita (I have a 1945 American edition of it, it's not been republished since, to my knowledge, though there are more recent English editions of other works). I wish there was a biography of him in English. I've read quite a bit of his work.

61banjo123
Mar 3, 3:47pm Top

happy new thread!

62charl08
Mar 3, 4:01pm Top

I've come back to daffodils about to open (I hope) - just yellow buds right now. We're predicted 70 mph winds tonight, so I'm hoping none of the new growth gets blown over.

63FAMeulstee
Mar 3, 4:19pm Top

>60 Caroline_McElwee: We used to own Louis Couperus complete works, Caroline, sadly not anymore. We had to choose between his complete works and those of Simon Vestdijk at the time, and my husband prefered to keep Vestdijk... The only Couperus book that is left is Old People and the Things that Pass.

>61 banjo123: Thank you, Rhonda!

>62 charl08: I saw the first daffodil in my garden opened today, Charlotte, an early small yellow one. The others will come later.
I hope the winds won't damage your garden.

64FAMeulstee
Mar 4, 5:05pm Top


book 81: Moordvrienden by Nele Neuhaus
from the library, e-book, translated from German, no English translation, 327 pages
TIOLI Challenge #8: Read a book by a woman who is born in the 20th century

Second book about the German police in Hessen, with main characters Oliver von Bodenstein and Pia Kirchhoff.

Slightly better than the first book, but still some unbelievabilities and coincidences in the plot.
I do like the two main characters, so for now I plan to coninue with the series.

65FAMeulstee
Mar 4, 5:13pm Top


book 82: De grote jacht by Robert Jordan
from the library, translated, fantasy, original title The great Hunt, 735 pages
TIOLI Challenge #10: Read a book that completes this sentence: (Title of Book) is/are complete madness!

Second book in the epic fantasy series "Wheel of Time".
This one kept my interest more than the first book. Not sure if it is a better story, or that I am growing fond of the main characters.

Good read, and so good there are many more to go :-)

66FAMeulstee
Mar 4, 5:29pm Top


book 83: Alles stroomt by Vasili Grossman
from the library, translated from Russian, English translation Everything flows, 224 pages
TIOLI Challenge #14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)

After 30 years in Siberia Ivan Grigorjevitsj returns. He visits family and meets some former friend, but every visit is akward, as everyone erased him from memory. He finds a job and a nice woman. Meanwhile we hear about the camps in Siberia, the great famine in Ukrain in the early 1930s, Russian history, Lenin and Stalin, the life of women in prisoner camps...

Grossman wrote this book at the end of his life. Despite the terrible things he wants the world to know, he is still compasionate and empathic about every human, both the suppressors and the suppresed.

67FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 4, 5:34pm Top


book 84: Winnetou bij de bedoeïenen by Karl May
own, translated from German, no English translation, 288 pages

Continued adventures with Old Shatterhand and Winnetou chasing villains in North-Africa, USA and Mexico.

68FAMeulstee
Mar 4, 5:39pm Top


book 85: Hoe gaat het met jou? Met mij gaat het goed by Liesbeth van Lennep
own, Dutch, YA, awarded, Vlag en Wimpel 1980, no translations, 91 pages
TIOLI Challenge #8: Read a book by a woman who is born in the 20th century

Maartje is in hospital, her appendix was removed. The other kids around are much younger, but she finds a boy of her age in the next chamber. They become friends in the few days they spend together in the hospital.

69Sakerfalcon
Mar 5, 5:42am Top

>66 FAMeulstee: The Vasili Grossman looks really good. However Life and fate has been sitting on Mount TBR for a long time so I should read that first.

70msf59
Mar 5, 7:30am Top

Happy Tuesday, Anita. I hope your week is off to a good start. Very cold here in the Midwest. We are waiting anxiously for the warmth of spring. I have a fantasy book and a political book going, which is helping balance my reading out. Grins...

71karenmarie
Mar 5, 7:35am Top

Hi Anita! I hope you're doing better with the agoraphobia.

72Familyhistorian
Mar 5, 5:20pm Top

Happy new thread and congratulations on reaching and going beyond 75 books read. Love the pictures of the spring flowers. Some of ours are out but temperatures are still cold for here and there is more snow predicted.

73richardderus
Mar 5, 8:54pm Top

Those Karl May Westerns with Winnetou read very differently to Americans...but they're fun. Happy Wednesday, dear Anita!

74BBGirl55
Mar 6, 1:41pm Top

Congratulations Anita on surpassing 75 books. Just to let you know that there's a vote happening on my thread. Happy Reading!

75kidzdoc
Mar 6, 3:27pm Top

Congratulations on reaching your first 75 books mark, Anita!

I thought that I owned a copy of Everything Flows, but it isn't in my LT library. I'll look for it at home soon.

76FAMeulstee
Mar 6, 6:37pm Top

>69 Sakerfalcon: Indeed Everything Flows was good, Claire, and a bit shorter than Life and Fate. No need to read the one before the other, although I think Life and Fate is his best book.

>70 msf59: Thank you, Mark, we are back to the more usual rainy weather, after a spell of recordbreaking spring in February. And I just keep on reading ;-)

>71 karenmarie: Thank you, Karen, sadly I had a setback yesterday. I am able to make short walks in the neighborhood, staying close to home. Planned a more challenging walk yesterday and that fell apart :-(

>72 Familyhistorian: Thank you, Meg, we had only a few days with a little snow this winter. The snowdrops and crocusses are done, daffodils are starting now.

>73 richardderus: I bet they do, Richard, in some ways they are very German. For me it is nostalgia, my brother had a few of them, and I bought the rest when I was young. Read all 50 many times. If I remember well there weren't many available in English translation when I first came to LT.

>74 BBGirl55: Thank you, Bryony, I voted :-)

>75 kidzdoc: Thank you, Darryl.
I have been reding some more Vasili Grossman recently, Life and Fate is still my favorite, but I want to read every book he wrote that is available in Dutch translation.

77FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 6, 7:00pm Top

Had a tough week last week. On Wednesday we visited my parents. My mother is very frail, she lost 10 kg in the last two years. She can't use her right arm anymore, after the stroke/TIA she had in January. It feels like life is slowly fading away. My father is very sad about that, he visits her every day. He used to come back happy from these visits, now it makes him sad.

On Friday Frank had an appointment with an endicronolist, as his cortisol levels are still on the high side. I wanted to go with him, that went well, but I am still terrified of hospitals, so it took a lot of energy. More tests this month and a next appointment in April.

Yesterday I wanted to try a more challenging walk on my own, as I hoped to gain some back from the returned agoraphobia, and that didn't work. Well I need some more patience for this to fade away.

78harrygbutler
Mar 6, 7:40pm Top

>77 FAMeulstee: I'm sorry to hear of your travails, Anita. My best wishes for strength and comfort to you all!

79Caroline_McElwee
Edited: Mar 7, 5:07am Top

>77 FAMeulstee: Well all that is a lot for anyone to be dealing with Anita, but with your other problems it is even more stressful I can believe.

One step at a time (err pun intended) on the walk front. At least you have your garden to go outside in.

80kidzdoc
Mar 7, 6:33am Top

I'm sorry to hear about your tough week and struggles with agoraphobia, Anita. I hope that it does fade soon.

81scaifea
Mar 7, 6:43am Top

I'm sorry that you had a rough week, too, Anita. Sending hugs and hopes that things get better for you!

82fuzzi
Mar 7, 7:49am Top

Hold on, friend.

83Sakerfalcon
Mar 7, 8:29am Top

I'm sorry to hear about your mother's decline, and your own continuing health woes. I wish you patience and strength at this time.

84The_Hibernator
Mar 7, 10:43am Top

I hope things get better for you soon! Sorry about your mom - mine is just starting an accelerated decline, so I know how it feels. It's hard to accept.

Good luck with your agoraphobia, as well.

85charl08
Mar 8, 3:21am Top

Sending more good wishes from me, Anita.

I've just been reading a lovely book translated from the Dutch Bird Cottage- beautiful descriptions (as you would expect) of garden birds. I was (pleasantly) surprised to find it was based on a real life UK person - after having read last month a Finnish book about the village where Darwin lived at the end of his life. A reminder about how close we are.
I will try not to say something about Brexit and European politics here. Oh no, failed.

86FAMeulstee
Mar 8, 5:46pm Top

>78 harrygbutler: Thank you, Harry, we can use a bit of comfort and strength.

>79 Caroline_McElwee: Thank you, Caroline, it often feels like there is always a lot going on in our life.
I am glad we have a garden, and the walking together with Frank is still going well. We still slowly increase the daily distance, yesterday and today we walked over 7 km. I just would like to be able to go out on my own. Not that I ever did that much, but I feel less locked if it is possible.

>80 kidzdoc: Thank you, Darryl, it has been hit an miss for over a year now. I hoped that going back to the Thyrax last year would be the solution. In my case the thyroid hormones have a large impact, and are hard to get right.

>81 scaifea: Thank you, Amber, it have been challenging times lately.

>82 fuzzi: Thank you, Fuzzi.

>83 Sakerfalcon: Thank you, Claire, I still have hope the phobia's will be gone in a few months.

>84 The_Hibernator: Thank you, Rachel, you have a lot on your plate too.
My mothers decline is hard on my father, and my sister keeps making it even harder...
The phobia's will probably vanish again someday, but it is so disappointing that they keep coming back.

>85 charl08: Thank you, Charlotte, can use all good wishes I can get.
I have seen Bird Cottage om Marks thread, glad you liked it, it sounds like good read.
The Brexit date is coming awfully close :-(

87PaulCranswick
Mar 8, 5:49pm Top

>77 FAMeulstee: Sorry to read about your mum, Anita. Every time I go back and see my own mum the difference in her is so marked, I have to do my utmost to not show her how it upsets me so. I don't get to see that fading away - it is sort of thrust at me on visits.

88FAMeulstee
Mar 9, 3:43am Top

>87 PaulCranswick: Thank you, Paul, my mother doesn't notice much anymore. She doesn't even recognise me lately. I think she still knows my father, but not sure about my remaining siblings. She only has short moments she seems to be there.
It is hard to see the decline, even harder for you, as you live so far away.

89charl08
Mar 9, 4:08am Top

>86 FAMeulstee: Yup, Brexit. Sigh.
In better news, I've signed up for an Art Pass which gives lots of discounts - hoping for more culture this year. Very much looking forward to the Mackintosh exhibit on tour from Glasgow - due here next week!

90FAMeulstee
Mar 9, 4:33am Top

>89 charl08: Enjoy the benefits of you Art Pass, Charlotte.
Last yer we bought a Museum Jaarkaart (Museum Year Card) and again this year, it gives free entry to almost all museums in the Netherlands. Works well for us.

91karenmarie
Mar 9, 7:03am Top

Hi Anita!

I hope that you and Frank have a good weekend and that the coming week is better than the last.

I'm so sorry that your mother's decline is accelerating and that your father is sad after each visit.

Hugs to you.

92kidzdoc
Mar 9, 11:38am Top

>90 FAMeulstee: I bought a Museumkaart during my first visit to the Netherlands in 2016, as a lovely woman in the Amsterdam Museum recommended it to me; I think that was the day before I met you and Frank, along with Tad and Julie, for the first time, when we went to the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. I see that this card is now only available to Dutch citizens, although there seems to be a somewhat similar card that tourists can purchase. That was an incredible bargain, and I wish that we had a card like that here in the US.

93richardderus
Mar 9, 11:58am Top

Happy reading, Anita, the best distraction ever from life's messy, frustrating issues.

Karl May's books have so much English-language competition it's hard to see why they're needed in this marketplace.

94PawsforThought
Mar 9, 1:13pm Top

>92 kidzdoc: I got the I amsterdam-card when I visited Amsterdam a few years ago - it was great! You got both free museum entries and free public transport (and a free canal cruise).
I always see if the places I visit have similar schemes - they usually so and if you're a museum-holic like myself, you definitely save money getting one.

95FAMeulstee
Mar 10, 7:15pm Top

>91 karenmarie: Thanks for the hugs, Karen, we had a good weekend. Filled with reading and today a visit to our friend Guido and his smooth Chow Chow Endo. Endo, a son of Chimay from our last litter, had his 10th birhtday last week.

>92 kidzdoc: Yes, I remember you had a Museumkaart, Darryl, you came back within a year to use it again :-)
I didn't know it wasn't available for foreigners anymore.

>93 richardderus: Thank you, Richard, that is good advice and I followed it :-)
It looks like some Karl May's books are available now in English translation. Only some books are set in the "Wild West", others in Germany, France, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Far East. For me it is mainly nostalgia, reading now the one that always has me in tears: "Winnetou's death" :'(

>94 PawsforThought: We do the same when we go on vacation.

96Berly
Mar 11, 2:59am Top

97humouress
Mar 11, 3:06am Top

Happy new thread, Anita!

Congratulations on reading 75 books! Took you long enough. We're already in March.

98ChelleBearss
Mar 11, 10:19am Top

Sorry to see things have been rough. Hope today brings a better week for you

99FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 4:54pm Top

>96 Berly: Thank you, Kim, whishing you the same.

>97 humouress: Thank you, Nina, did it February LOL!

>98 ChelleBearss: Thank you, Chelle, I hope so too...

100FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:10pm Top


book 86: Radetzkymars by Joseph Roth
1001 books, from the library, e-book, translated from German, English translation The Radetzky March, 383 pages
TIOLI Challenge #2: Read a Book where the author or a character has the name of "Joe" or a variation thereof

Three generations in the declining Austrian-Hungarian Empire.
Grandfather Von Trotta is ennobled after saving the Emperor in a battle. His son becomes a district commissioner, and feels the first trouble with nationalistic tendencies. His grandson Carl-Joseph joins the army, and is stationed near the Russian border. Life in the army isn't bad in time of peace, but more friction is felt and then World War 1 starts.

101FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:20pm Top


book 87: Predikant by Camilla Läckberg
from the library, e-book, translated from Swedish, English translation The Preacher, 365 pages
TIOLI Challenge #6: Read a book somebody else picked for you

Second book with writer Erica Falck and police officer Patrik Hedström. Erika and Patrik are expecting their first child. Erica has a hard time in the last weeks of pregnancy, and even more from relatives who come unannounced and want to stay for a while.
Meanwhile a body of a young woman is found, and two more bodies that might be earlier victims of the same murderer. Soon after turns out that an other young woman is missing...

Liked this one a bit less than the first book.

102FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:27pm Top


book 88: Papillon by Henri Charrière
from the library, translated from French, English translation Papillon, 508 pages
TIOLI Challenge #6: Read a book somebody else picked for you

The adventures of Henri Charrière, alias Papillon, who was convicted of a crime he did not commit in 1931. Send for life to forced labor prison (bagno) in French-Guyana, never stopped to try to escape and finally succeeded.

103FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:39pm Top


book 89: Het vuur : dagboek van een escouade by Henri Barbusse
1001 books, from the library, e-book, translated from French, English translation Under Fire, 427 pages
TIOLI Challenge #3: Read a Book that is in the "Recommended" section on your home page

A story about a group of French soldiers in the trenches of World War 1. The terrible conditions, only broken by some days off, in a village where many other soldiers are staying and food and wine are getting scarse. After a senseless attack on the German trenches only a few of them are still alive...
The last chapter is call to end all wars.

Published during the war, in 1916, this novel had a large impact.

104FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:43pm Top


book 90: Ademnood by Dick Francis
from the library, e-book, translated, original title Forfeit, 427 pages
TIOLI Challenge #6: Read a book somebody else picked for you

Journalist gets in trouble when he discovers a big bettting scam on the race tracks.

105FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 6:51pm Top


book 91: De dood van Winnetou by Karl May
own, YA, translated from German, no English translation, 365 pages

Continued adventures with Old Shatterhand and Winnetou chasing villains.
This is the saddest book, as the title gives away ("The death of Winnetou") Winnetou dies :'(

My (now deceased) brother refused to read any Karl May book after this one, as he hated the death scene.
My other brother & me just kept on reading Karl May, although every time again I read this book, I am in tears when it happens.

106FAMeulstee
Mar 11, 7:00pm Top


book 92: Het teken van Wichart by Alet Schouten
own, YA, Dutch, awarded, Prijs Stichting Kinderbelangen 1969, English translation Flight into Danger, 160 pages
TIOLI Challenge #5: ROLLING CHALLENGE: Read a book with a significant connection to the countries of the United Kingdom

Needed a comfort read after the previous book, third read since I joined LT. And probably read it a dozen times before joining LT.
Hari escapes from the court of King Penda, together with Dai and a big wolfhound named Lufra. Hari doesn't remember much from his young years, only that he is stolen from Dorestad. They go through Wales, find a ship to Dorestad, and after some adventures Hari finds out where he came from.

Love this story each time again :-)

107humouress
Mar 11, 8:47pm Top

>99 FAMeulstee: Ah, okay then. That makes all the difference.

108EllaTim
Mar 11, 9:33pm Top

Hi Anita! Glad you had a good weekend!

>103 FAMeulstee: Seems LT picked a good one for you. Though not a light read I think.

>105 FAMeulstee: I read it once, and avoided it after that. Too sad for me.

109FAMeulstee
Mar 12, 10:35am Top

>107 humouress: Pfew.... ;-)

>108 EllaTim: Thank you, Ella, I hope your weekend was good as well.
Yes, Het vuur: dagboek van een escouade was a very good addition to my World War 1 reads.
Winnetou's death is almost as heartbreaking as the deaths of his dog Dojan and arabic horse Rih in the Kara Ben Nemsi books. I have read them all at least a dozen times. The 50 Karl May books were the first I bought again, when I realised I could read again in 2008.

110jnwelch
Mar 12, 1:59pm Top

Hi, Anita. Over 7 km. walking is a nice, long walk! I hope the agoraphobia eases up on you so you can do it on your own when you want.

I’m glad you’re joining in on the Dick Francis group reads/re-reads. I’d forgotten how much I enjoy his mysteries.

111LovingLit
Mar 13, 5:09am Top

>102 FAMeulstee: now there's one I have forever heard of but never read. (I know, there are hundreds. But that one I have seen and wondered about for ages as everyone's dad seemed to have it when I was younger.)

112Caroline_McElwee
Mar 13, 5:17am Top

>102 FAMeulstee: So long since I read that book Anita.

113paulstalder
Mar 13, 7:42am Top

>105 FAMeulstee: Yes, reading about the death of Winnetou was not easy ... I almost gave up reading Karl May as your brother did.
But what was also intriguing were the last talk of Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, showing the Christian faith.

114The_Hibernator
Mar 13, 9:19am Top

>86 FAMeulstee: My mothers decline is hard on my father, and my sister keeps making it even harder...

Yes, I'm in the same situation with my sister. I always said I wouldn't be in "one of those" families where the siblings fought over their ailing parents, but here we are! I guess different people cope in different ways.

115streamsong
Mar 13, 1:13pm Top

Hugs for you, and your parents. I'm so sorry you are going through this.

I am so tempted to try out the 'Recommended by LT' feature. Right now I have too many library books home and also too few books read from off my shelf this year. I must.be.strong.

But the number one rec'd book for me looks interesting ...

116Morphidae
Mar 13, 3:47pm Top

>106 FAMeulstee: *BANG!* Got me with a book bullet.

117richardderus
Mar 13, 5:11pm Top

{{{Anita}}}

Your rough passage reminds me of all the many things I have to be grateful for; it might not feel like it right now, but it will do the same for you one day. I hope that day comes soon.

118FAMeulstee
Edited: Mar 13, 7:05pm Top

>110 jnwelch: Thank you, Joe, we have slowly upped the distance. When started over a year ago we did barely 2 km. Walking feels good, and is very addictive ;-)
I will be very happy when the phobia's are gone, the sleeping phobia seems to ease a bit, I hope the agoraphobia does the same soon, I hope...
I have never read Dick Francis before the group read, and I am very glad I jumped in!

>111 LovingLit: The copy we had (and culled) came from my father in law, Megan, my dad didn't have it.

>112 Caroline_McElwee: And do you remember if you liked it, Caroline?

>113 paulstalder: In some ways Karl May was a missionay for Christianity, Paul, and a pacifist. I wished all Christians were as peacefull as his main characters...

>114 The_Hibernator: Thank you, Rachel, sorry you are in a similair situation.
Sadly the disagreements between us (siblings) have a long history. I broke with my sister long time ago, as she can't accept other views besides her own. I am glad my remaining brother and me always could get along.

>115 streamsong: Thank you, Janet, it isn't easy with aging parents. And very sad it is impossible to reason with my sister.
Yes that is a fun feature, I never gave it much attention until it was a TIOLI Challenge.
Maybe just go for that LT recommended book?

>116 Morphidae: I hope you can find a copy, Morphy, there are only three copies of the English translation on LT. If you like Rosemary Sutcliff you will probably like this book.

>117 richardderus: Thank you, Richard dear, it isn't my best time at the moment... Although I still have a lot I am gratefull for: a lovely husband, a roof above my head, a few friends, all the good people in this group, and I am very gratefull that I am able to read a lot again (that has been much worse in the past).
And (((hugs))) back to you!

119Morphidae
Mar 14, 12:54pm Top

>118 FAMeulstee: I made sure I could find it before adding it to Mount TBR. We have an excellent library system here in Minnesota and I’ve requested it from ILL.

120Caroline_McElwee
Mar 14, 5:16pm Top

>118 FAMeulstee: I did like Papillon Anita, and I liked the film too. I don't think I was as taken by the follow-up book though.

121FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 10:25am Top

>119 Morphidae: I hope you like it, Morphy, I can't vouch for the translation.

>120 Caroline_McElwee: Thanks, Caroline, then I will skip the next book.

122FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 10:33am Top


book 93: De ijzeren engel by Cassandra Clare
from the library, e-book, translated, original title Clockwork angel, 464 pages
TIOLI Challenge #11: Read a book of alternate history written by a woman

A tale of vampiers, demons and orther creatures, set in 19th century London.
It is the first book in a series, not a bad story, but not my taste. I probably won't read the other books, unless I have absolutely nothing else to read...

123FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 10:39am Top


book 94: Laura's gedichten by Laura Ranger
own, poetry, children's/YA, translated, awarded, Vlag en Wimpel 1998, original title Laura's Poems, 65 pages
TIOLI Challenge #7: read a book of poetry

Laura Ranger from New-Zealand wrote some amazing poetry for her age, the poems in this book were written between the age of 6 and 9.

124FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 10:53am Top


book 95: M. by Shira Keller
from the library, Dutch, no translations, 144 pages
TIOLI Challenge #13: Read a book where you find an article of clothing in the first sentence and so get fully dressed

Leah Rosenberg is a sculptor, she just took a big assignment to make a self-portrait. She struggles, as she finds it hard to put herself in stone. Meanwhile we learn about her past. Het Jewish grandparents didn't like it that her father married a non Jewish woman. During her school days she had an affair with one of her teachers, this ended in a drama.

125FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 11:05am Top


book 96: De gekwelde man by Henning Mankell
from the library, e-book, translated from Swedish, English translation The Troubled Man, 603 pages
TIOLI Challenge #4: Read a book that starts with a quote for the semi-rolling alphabet challenge

When Linda's father in law, a retired marine officer, disappears shortly after celebrating his 75th birthday, Wallander goes on search for him. An incident with submarines during the Cold War seems to be related to the disappearance.

Sadly this was the last Kurt Wallander book. I have enjoyed the series.

126FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 11:12am Top


book 97: In de greep van de citroenzucht by Alet Schouten
own, Dutch, YA, no translations, 155 pages
TIOLI Challenge #1: Read a book whose title starts with the last letter of the author's last name of the preceding book

Thijs and Gartje are neighbors and friends. An unknown illness breaks out in the USA, turning people's skin yellow. The ilness spreads all over the world, but strangly only Thijs and Gartje are not affected. Soon they are threathened in their own place, and have to flight. There seems to be a relation between the illness and pollution. Thijs and Gartje hope to find a clue, as some elder ladies seem to know more...

127FAMeulstee
Mar 15, 11:33am Top


book 98: Dolende ridders op Verda by Hermann Molenkamp
from my father, Dutch, fantasy, no translations, 469 pages
TIOLI Challenge #12: Read a book you had to wait for

The last book of the "Redders van het Imperium" trilogy.
After finishing their quest on the planet Solna, our three hero's, Marc, Stavos and Paco, go for their last quest to the planet Verda. They travel around to find the last missing part, and get mixed up in the planets politics

Again a nice (but very white male) adventurous story, and a neat conclusion.

My father got this book from the author, as my father helped him with proof reading. The author lived just long enough to see this last book published in December 2018, he died last January.

128fuzzi
Mar 15, 9:29pm Top

>116 Morphidae: me too...

129charl08
Mar 16, 8:06am Top

>127 FAMeulstee: Nice personal connection to the book Anita. Will you keep this one on your shelf?

130FAMeulstee
Mar 16, 10:16am Top

>128 fuzzi: I hope you find a copy, Fuzzi.

>129 charl08: Yes it was a nice connection, Charlotte.
The book isn't mine, so I will return it to my father. One day it will probably come back to me, as I think my brother and sister are not interested. I have the first two books on the shelf, when the writer heard I had read them he gave me those two.

131FAMeulstee
Mar 16, 10:28am Top

My 11th Thingaversary was 10 days ago, today 9 books arrived to celebrate :-)

Doem en dorst by Albert Besnard (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1953)
Nog pas gisteren by Maria Dermoût (Dutch, Jan Campert prijs 1952)
Klein t(er)reurspel by Jan Elburg (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1948)
Zonder dansmeester by Jozef Eyckmans (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1967)
Het innerlijk behang en andere gedichten by Hans Lodeizen (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1950)
Going my way by Michiel van der Plas (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1949)
Ik was getrouwd met een communist by Philip Roth (translated, it was hard to find a copy!)
Werelden by Nes Tergast (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1954)
Met het oog op morgen by Bert Voeten (Dutch poetry, Jan Campert prijs 1951)

Next week the Bookweek starts, so then we will buy some more books to complete the required number of Thingaversary books.

132Caroline_McElwee
Mar 16, 2:11pm Top

>131 FAMeulstee: Happy ThingAversary Anita. I managed to miss mine this year, but I've bought more than enough books in three months to have catered for it. Enjoy your haul.

133humouress
Mar 16, 3:09pm Top

Happy Thingaversary, Anita!

It's not mine for a few months yet, but I confess to some book shopping. Not to mention some clicking on my Kindle - it's too easy to accumulate books on that.

134ronincats
Mar 16, 3:19pm Top

Oh, a belated Happy Thingaversary, Anita! Looks like you know how to celebrate.

135Morphidae
Edited: Mar 16, 3:30pm Top

136EllaTim
Mar 16, 6:33pm Top

>131 FAMeulstee: Happy Thingaversary, Anita! And what a nice book haul you have got there. Have you always been interested in poetry?

Will have to keep an eye out for the opening of the Bookweek:-)

137jessibud2
Mar 16, 6:50pm Top

Happy Thingaversary, Anita!! And many more!

138msf59
Mar 17, 7:30am Top

Happy Sunday, Anita! Happy Thingaversary! This will be my eleventh year too. It is so hard to believe. I think we are here to stay.

139jnwelch
Mar 17, 10:03am Top

Happy Thingaversary, Anita!

I started in 2008, too. Like Mark, I'm thinking we're here to stay. Looks like a great book haul to celebrate. I know Philip Roth, but all the Dutch authors and poets have me stumped. :-)

140FAMeulstee
Mar 17, 5:04pm Top

>132 Caroline_McElwee: Thank you, Caroline, buying books is always good. Having an excuse is even better ;-)

>133 humouress: Thank you, Nina!
Yes, e-books accummulate so much easier, but I have manged to keep that number low (owning only 33 e-books), as I lend many e-books from the e-library.

>134 ronincats: Thank you, Roni, that is the best part of having a Thingaversary ;-)

>135 Morphidae: Thank you, Morphy!
I see you are one your way to your 13th this year.

141johnsimpson
Mar 17, 5:07pm Top

Happy Thingaversary Anita my dear.

142FAMeulstee
Mar 17, 5:14pm Top

>136 EllaTim: Thank you, Ella, all 2nd hand from boekwinkeltjes.nl
We have a fairly large poetry collection, 233 books at the moment. Frank always liked poetry, when he got ill in the 1990s he wasn't able to read full books anymore, so he started reading a poem now and then. I tend to collect awarded books, so we started to collect awarded poetry. Somehow we never got to the Jan Campert prize winners, so that is our present project.

>137 jessibud2: Thank you, Shelley, I hope to enjoy LT many years to come :-)

>138 msf59: Thank you, Mark, defenitly here to stay as long as possible!

>139 jnwelch: Thank you, Joe, 2008 was a good year for us and Mark.
Frank is a fan of Philip Roth, we had been searching a long time for this book, so Frank was very happy to find a copy.
One of the Dutch is available to you, "Nog pas gisteren" by Maria Dermoût is available in English translation as Yesterday, I saw a review by Darryl on the book page.

143FAMeulstee
Mar 17, 5:14pm Top

>141 johnsimpson: Thank you, John.

144FAMeulstee
Mar 17, 5:43pm Top


book 99: Stormnacht by Jim Butcher
from the library, translated, original title Storm Front, 303 pages
TIOLI Challenge #9: Read a book with a job/occupation in the title or author's name

I like to read series, and I had seen "The Dresden Files" on some of the treads here.

Mystery meets magic, Harry Dresden is a magican who assists the Chicago police occasionally. He is called to a very nasty murder, that involved magic, and soon fears for his own life.

Didn't like it as much as I hoped, somehow magic thrown into "real life" doesn't work for me.

145FAMeulstee
Mar 17, 5:53pm Top


book 100: Het eind van het verhaal by Lydia Davis
1001 books, from the library, translated, original title The End of the Story, 249 pages
TIOLI Challenge #13: Read a book where you find an article of clothing in the first sentence and so get fully dressed

An unnamed (and unpleasant) woman looks back on the relation she had with a 12 year younger man. She was not nice to him during their relationship, and becomes very angry when he ends it. She starts behaving like an teenager in love, trying to be where he is, hoping he will take her back.

The fist time this year I regret I didn't Pearl Rule a book. I didn't like the writing style and didn't like the main character.
The only interesting part was how the story played on memories changing in time.

146banjo123
Mar 17, 6:17pm Top

happy thingaversery!

147FAMeulstee
Mar 18, 5:24pm Top

>146 banjo123: Thank you, Rhonda!

148PaulCranswick
Mar 19, 3:28am Top

100 books, wowzer!

I trust that all is well with you and Frank after the incidents in Utrecht yesterday.

Thinking about all my friends from the Netherlands. One of my favourite places. I have spent happy times in Valkenburg and Eindhoven and Amsterdam.

149FAMeulstee
Mar 19, 4:22am Top

>148 PaulCranswick: Thank you, Paul.
We were and are safe at home in Lelystad.

It is so sad what happened, people killed at a place they should be safe.
Also I can't imagine how disturbed, hurt and angry someone has to be to act like that :'(

150SirThomas
Mar 20, 11:23am Top

A belated happy new thread and happy thingaversary, Anita.
And congratulations for reaching book #100!
I wish you all the best.

151ChelleBearss
Mar 20, 8:35pm Top

Happy belated Thingaversary! Gotta love a reason to buy books! :)

152FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 5:04pm Top

>150 SirThomas: Thank you, Thomas, all happy occasions :-)
I hope all is well with you.

>151 ChelleBearss: Thank you, Chelle, it is always good to have an excuse for buying books.
Saturday we will order some more books, at the start of the Dutch Book Week.

153FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 5:15pm Top


book 101: Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
own, translated from Japanese, English translation Norwegian Wood, 317 pages
TIOLI Challenge #1: Read a book whose title starts with the last letter of the author's last name of the preceding book

A man thinks back about his years at the university. Lonelyness, friendship, complicated relationships and a lot of suicides...

My first Haruki Murakami, and I enjoyed it. I desperately needed a good read after the previous book!

154FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 5:25pm Top


book 102: Een overtollig mens by J.M.A. Biesheuvel
own, Dutch, Boekenweekgeschenk 1988, no translations, 94 pages
TIOLI Challenge #4: Read a book that starts with a quote for the semi-rolling alphabet challenge

Five tragic stories, with a touch of humor.

155FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 5:31pm Top


book 103: Een onberispelijke man by Jane Gardam
from the library, translated, original title Old Filth, 320 pages
TIOLI Challenge #8: Read a book by a woman who is born in the 20th century

Old man looking back at his life. Born in Malaysia, send to England as a kid, he finally became a judge in Hong Kong. After his retirement he went back to England.

A bit much nostalgia about the Brittish Empire...

156FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 5:38pm Top


book 104: Het zevende gebod by Michael Jecks
from the library, translated, original title The Leper's Return, 317 pages

Sixth book in the Sir Baldwin series (Medieval West Country Mysteries), set in 14th century England.
In Crediton a man is murdered, Sir Baldwin tries to find out what happened.

Nice story, nice plot.

157karenmarie
Mar 21, 5:54pm Top

Hi Anita!

Two big mileestones - Happy 11th Thingaversary and congratulations on reading 100 books so far this year.

158msf59
Mar 21, 7:11pm Top

Hooray for your first Murakami, Anita. I hope this is just the beginning of a love affair...grins. Sorry, you did not feel the same about Old Filth. I loved this book and the entire trilogy.

159FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 7:43pm Top

>157 karenmarie: Thank you, Karen!
Lots of reading & buying books, life is good :-)

>158 msf59: Thank you, Mark, I intend to read more by Murakami.
I am not sure yet if I want to read the other two books. Can't love all the same books ;-)

160sirfurboy
Mar 22, 6:00am Top

>153 FAMeulstee: I never really got on with Murakami. I did read this one, although its off my usual genres. I have yet to read one of his stories where he ties up even the majority of the loose ends, but that is clearly a deliberate decision on his part. I am glad you enjoyed it.

161Deern
Mar 22, 8:19am Top

Belated Happy TA and a very happy weekend to you and Frank!

162paulstalder
Mar 23, 4:32pm Top



wish you a nice, relaxing weekend

163banjo123
Mar 23, 4:43pm Top

Happy weekend! I liked Norwegian Wood quite a lot.

164FAMeulstee
Mar 23, 5:55pm Top

>160 sirfurboy: I can understand Murakami is not for everyone, Stephen. This book didn't put me off, so I intend to read more by him.

>161 Deern: Thank you, Nathalie!
Happy to see you around :-)

>162 paulstalder: Thank you, Paul, the same to you.

>163 banjo123: Thank you, Rhonda, have you read other Murakami books to recommend?

165vancouverdeb
Mar 23, 6:52pm Top

Happy Weekend, Anita! Lots of great reading going on!

166Morphidae
Edited: Mar 24, 12:40pm Top

>164 FAMeulstee: I'm not Rhonda but I thought The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle was pretty good. It depends on how you feel about open-ended books.

My mini-review, "I went back and forth between rating this a 6 and a 7. I finally settled on a 7 because despite the rambling and odd nature of it and its length, I cared about the characters and wanted to know what happened. Also, he gives a good sense of place without being flowery. But then I want to change it to a 6 again because there was little resolution to ANY of the plot threads. I was left with the feeling of "who are these people?"?

167johnsimpson
Mar 24, 5:36pm Top

Hi Anita, belated congratulations on reaching 100 books read my dear, I have been absent for a few days and am now catching up. Hope you have had a good weekend dear friend.

168FAMeulstee
Mar 24, 6:47pm Top

>165 vancouverdeb: Thank you, Deborah, the weekend flew by while I was reading ;-)

>166 Morphidae: Thank you, Morphy, much appriciated.
I do like it when ends are tight at the end, but don't mind open ends either.
Both The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and Kafka on the Shore are big tomes, so I will finish Middlemarch fist before deciding on Murakami.

>167 johnsimpson: Thank you, John.
The weather was nice this weekend, so besides daily reading and walking, I worked a bit in the garden.

169EllaTim
Mar 24, 8:53pm Top

>154 FAMeulstee: Liked that one as well when I read it years ago. Though the only thing that has really stuck in my mind is the title.

>155 FAMeulstee: I loved it, but as you say, we can't all love the same things.

And as the weekend has passed I will now wish you a nice week ahead. It is nice to see things flowering isn't it?

170humouress
Mar 24, 11:35pm Top

Aiyoh! You've passed 100 now?

Congratulations!

171banjo123
Mar 25, 12:18am Top

I think that Kafka on the Shore and The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles are my favorite Murakami, but they are pretty different from Norwegian Wood-- more of a sort of Magical realism.

172jnwelch
Mar 25, 3:40pm Top

What Rhonda said, Anita. Kafka on the Shore and The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle are my top Murakamis, although there are some close runners-up, including 1Q84 and Hard-Boiled Wonderland. All of those are quite different from Norwegian Wood, which I remember as having a more conventional storyline. Norwegian Wood was his first big hit in Japan, and then beyond.

He's a favorite author for me, as you can probably tell.

173FAMeulstee
Mar 25, 8:08pm Top

>169 EllaTim: The title id typical Biesheuvel, Ella, I always feel a bit sad for him.
After the recent elections I am SO fed up with longing to colonial times (or the screwed version of the "50s", or even further back), so Old Filth pushed the wrong buttons for me.
The only backlash of spring and flowers is that Frank is suffering from his pollen allergies :-(

>170 humouress: Yes, Nina, thank you. I hope your book funk is over soon.

>171 banjo123: Thanks, Rhonda, I am going to try one of these two. Probably this year.

>172 jnwelch: Thank you, Joe, I can tell you are a fan!
As I said to Rhona above, it is going to be one of these two to try later this year.

174FAMeulstee
Mar 28, 12:04pm Top

We had a great Bookweek haul:
Jas van belofte by Jan Siebelink (bookweek gift)
Mijn moeders strijd by Murat Isik (bookweek)
Vonkt by Marije Langelaar
Niemandslandnacht by Annemarie Estor
Exit geest by Philp Roth
Serotonine by Michel Houellebecq
Vriendendienst by Donna Leon (e-book)
Onrustig tij by Donna Leon (e-book)
Bedrieglijke zaken by Donna Leon (e-book)

And then I found the last two books from the "Franse Bibliotheek" at affordable price at online 2nd hand bookshops, they should arrive tomorrow:
De blauwe jurk van Camille by Michèle Desbordes
Vuur van Brigid en andere wintermythen by Pierre Michon

--
Yesterday we went to the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and saw the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Russia playing Shostakovich, Rachamaninow and Boyarsky.

--
Meanwhile I have been reading a lot and finished Middlemarch, reviews to come.

175fuzzi
Edited: Mar 28, 12:46pm Top

Oh, what a nice selection of music that must have been.

I look forward to your review of Middlemarch.

176Caroline_McElwee
Mar 28, 3:00pm Top

>168 FAMeulstee: oooh, Middlemarch is a favourite, and due a reread soonish.

177FAMeulstee
Mar 28, 7:41pm Top

>175 fuzzi: Yes it was beautiful. We came for the 9th Symphony by Shostakovich (isn't performed very often) and and the Symphonic Dances by Sergei Rachmaninoff (his last work). They were both wonderfull.
The third work was Concerto for Cello, Voice and Symphony Orchestra by a young composer, Konstantin Boyarsky. Not as good as the other two, but the two solists were very good.
Not in the mood to write reviews yet...

>176 Caroline_McElwee: I enjoyed, Middlemarch, Caroline, but it won't be one of my top reads for the year.
I hope I am in better shape to write reviews tomorrow, seven books read and not reviewed yet.

178Morphidae
Mar 28, 9:41pm Top

>176 Caroline_McElwee: >177 FAMeulstee: I know that Middlemarch is popular and I don’t get it. I didn’t get past more than ten pages without putting it down - with great force. I found the language style totally off-putting. I’m curious as to what you two like about it.

179sirfurboy
Mar 29, 8:18am Top

>177 FAMeulstee: Oh another Middlemarch reader! I liked the story too. I think the characterisation was very well done. Morphidae says the language is off putting which is quite understandable - the book is old, and the language and style demonstrate that, although interestingly the author's observation of language usage also comes out in the book.

180FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 10:30am Top

>178 Morphidae: It took me a while to get into the story, Morphy, it takes time to get to know all the characters.
I probably didn't get some, references to books and events were explained in the endnotes, but they will speak more to readers who grew up with English history.

>179 sirfurboy: My (recent) translation was very readable, Stephen, so there was no problem. I would call it a literary soap ;-)

181FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 10:35am Top


book 105: Tweede persoon enkelvoud by Sayed Kashua
from the library, e-book, translated from Hebrew, English translation Second Person Singular, 303 pages
TIOLI Challenge #12: Read a book you had to wait for

Identity and jealousy in Jerusalem, from an Arab Israeli perspective. Intriguing read.

182FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 10:44am Top


book 106: De ridderslag by Rosemary Sutcliff
own, YA, translated, original title Knight's Fee, 224 pages
TIOLI Challenge #5: ROLLING CHALLENGE: Read a book with a significant connection to the countries of the United Kingdom

Set in England, 11th century when the sons of William the Conquerer are in power.
Randall, an orphan boy, gets in trouble, but is recued by a bard. He has no musical abilities, so he is send to a lord to be with his grandson. They become friends and end up together at the battle of Tenchebrai.

A part of history I wasn't familiair with. Good read, like all books by Rosemary Sutcliff.

183FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 10:57am Top


book 107: Ik Jan Cremer by Jan Cremer
1001 books, from the library, e-book, Dutch Canon, English translation I, Jan Cremer, 389 pages
TIOLI Challenge #14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)

A scandal when this autobiograpy was published back in 1964, containing explicit sex, alcohol consumption and obscenity.
Through time the dust has settled, what remained is a tale of an adventurous, obnoxious boy who lost his father and grew up wanting to be a painter, but is thrown out of two art schools.

Nice, although I took the content here and there with a grain of salt, especially how all women would fall for him ;-)

184FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 29, 7:47am Top


book 108: Mijn haat krijgen jullie niet by Antoine Leiris
from the library, e-book, translated from French, English translation You Will Not Have My Hate, 110 pages

The writer lost his wife at Bataclan, 13 November 2015. In this book his experiences from that night and the weeks afer, being left with his young son.

I wanted to read this book after the recent attacks in Christchurch, and closer to home in Utrecht, where other people lost their loved ones. It was an impressive read.

185FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 11:20am Top


book 109: Het schrift van Perle by Timothée de Fombelle
from the library, e-book, YA, translated from French, English translation The Book of Pearl, 336 pages
TIOLI Challenge #14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)

A cross between fairytale and historic ficion, it may sound odd, but is is a beautiful tale of love, a curse and determination to find a way back.

Timothée de Fombelle writes lovely books, each and everyone was a joy to read, this one was no exception.

186FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 11:31am Top


book 110: Middlemarch by George Eliot
1001 books, own, translated, original title Middlemarch, 1019 pages
TIOLI Challenge #14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)

Nice peak into early 19th century England.
Love and marriage in Middlemarch families, with a large cast of believable characters, all with their flaws and struggles.

I am not familiar with most of the references to books and events, that were explained in the endnotes, and think they will speak more to readers who grew up with English culture and history.

187FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 11:43am Top


book 111: Het roze huis by Pierre Bergounioux
own, translated from French, no English translation, 167 pages
TIOLI Challenge #14: PECAN PIE rolling challenge (word in title or author's name starts with letters in rolling order)

A childhood in the 1950s/1960s. Descriptions of the family gatherings in "The Pink House" (=title), where the grandparents live. The family comes together for weddings and burials, each time the main character is some years oder and gets more insight in family dynamics.

Set in the same village where Een stap en dan de volgende took place.

188Caroline_McElwee
Edited: Mar 29, 11:54am Top

>178 Morphidae: well I guess I am familiar with the writing style of the era Morphy, as I read a fair few books from it quite young. I think in Middlemarch the characters are flawed and real. I both empathise with Dorothea, and sometimes want to slap her chops. I've probably read it three times so far. It's a kind of social dance I suppose.

189FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 12:01pm Top


book 112: Doofpot by Dick Francis
from the library, e-book, translated, original title Decider, 264 pages
TIOLI Challenge #5: ROLLING CHALLENGE: Read a book with a significant connection to the countries of the United Kingdom

Lee Morris is an architect and father of 6 sons. He owns some shares of a racetrack, all other shares are owned within one family. When the (grand-)father, who managed the racetrack, dies the family is fighting about what to do. The architect wants to upgrade, other family members want to sell. Even the architects sons get involved in the nasty battle.

190fuzzi
Mar 29, 2:33pm Top

>188 Caroline_McElwee: yes, the characters were flawed and real, exactly!

And yet, even the most despicable of them got sympathy from me for some of their actions, but not all.

I like three dimensional people.

191scaifea
Mar 29, 2:48pm Top

>182 FAMeulstee: Oh, yay, I'm so glad you liked this one, too! It's the second Sutcliff I've read and I think I need to seek out more...

192FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 4:06pm Top

>190 fuzzi: Indeed none of them has only good sides and none is completey bad, all characters are lifelike.

>191 scaifea: You can find many of them in my LT library, Amber, with my ratings. I own every book by Rosemary Sutcliff that was ever published in Dutch translation.

193streamsong
Mar 29, 4:36pm Top

Hi Anita - awed by your reading, as usual. :)

You've encouraged me to read Middlemarch - there are so many of the classics that I haven't read.

Love your book haul and the concert sounds wonderful; you had a great day!

194FAMeulstee
Mar 29, 6:58pm Top

>193 streamsong: Thank you, Janet, I am almost getting used to read this much ;-)
(although I vividly remember the years I was not able to read, so it still feels like a special gift to me from the universe)

Way too many classics to read, I do try to read at least one each month. I hope you get to Middlemarch and more importantly, I hope you will enjoy it!

March is my book buying month, with both my Thingaversary and the Dutch Bookweek.

195kidzdoc
Mar 30, 5:56am Top

I'm glad that you liked Second Person Singular, Anita. The woman on the cover doesn't look to be Arab or Israeli, though!

196charl08
Mar 30, 8:14am Top

Sounds like a great haul for bookweek Anita. I wish they did this for grownups in the UK too! The kids get all the fun...

197FAMeulstee
Mar 30, 9:40am Top

>195 kidzdoc: Thank you, Darryl, have you read it?
Covers... don't start me about some covers... And this one isn't even that bad.

>196 charl08: Yes a great haul, Charlotte, a good bookweek this year. Today the last two books ordered online came, now we have all the hardcovers of the publishers series "Franse Bibliotheek" (French Library). The last 4 books were hard to find, there were only 50 hardcovers published with the first edition.
We have two bookweeks here, in March for the adults and in October the Childrens Bookweek, both with a free book if you buy books. And June is the month of thrilling books (thrillers, mysteries etc), also a free book that month.

Tomorrow we will go to Hengelo by train, at the last Sunday of the bookweek you can use the bookweekgift as free trainticket.

198kidzdoc
Mar 30, 3:45pm Top

>197 FAMeulstee: I haven't read and don't own Second Person Singular, Anita. I do own two of Sayed Kashua's books, Dancing Arabs and Let It Be Morning, but I haven't read either one.

199Ameise1
Mar 31, 5:31am Top

Happy Sunday, Anita. I hope it's sunny and warm at your place and your strength is coming back.

200msf59
Mar 31, 7:39am Top

Happy Sunday, Anita. I hope you are having a good weekend. I see you are flying through the books, as usual. Hooray, for finally getting to Middlemarch. I really loved that one. It is supposed to warm up a bit this week. I want things to begin to bloom and turn green.

201FAMeulstee
Mar 31, 6:49pm Top

>198 kidzdoc: I might get to Dancing Arabs, Darryl, it is available in Dutch translation. A new book of him was just translated, about an Arab Israeli who went to the USA.

>199 Ameise1: Thank you, Barbara, we are just back home from a day out :-)

>200 msf59: Thank you, Mark, I am glad I read Middlemarch. Not love, but liked it very much.
In my garden the plum and the eary tulips are blooming, and the Japanes Maple is turning red with the new leaves.

--
We went to Hengelo by train today, as we could travel free with our bookweek book. We had diner in Hengelo, went back to Lelystad and walked home from the station (6 km).

202humouress
Apr 1, 12:17am Top

>201 FAMeulstee: Good to see your walking is back on track. (Pun unintended.)

203FAMeulstee
Apr 1, 6:15am Top

>202 humouress: Thank you, Nina. Indeed we are right back on track. Life is good :-)

204FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 1, 6:22am Top


book 113: Vroeger was de aarde plat by Marten Toonder
own, Dutch, non-fiction, no translations, 301 pages
TIOLI Challenge #5: ROLLING CHALLENGE: Read a book with a significant connection to the countries of the United Kingdom

Autobiograpy of Marten Toonder, who got famous with his Tom Poes &Bommel stories.
From his birth (1912) in Rotterdam to his first job in Leiden, ending in 1939.

205FAMeulstee
Apr 1, 6:29am Top


book 114: Waar je bang voor bent by Pema Chödrön
own, translated, non-fiction, original title The Places That Scare You, 144 pages
TIOLI Challenge #8: Read a book by a woman who is born in the 20th century

American Budhhist nun explaines about her way of life, using meditation and compassion.

206FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 1, 6:35am Top

March 2019 in numbers

34 books read (10,829 pages, 349.3 pages a day)

own 13 (38 %) / library 20 / other 1

21 male author / 13 female author
8 originally written in Dutch / 26 translated into Dutch
31 fiction / 3 non-fiction

30 books in TIOLI Challenges
14 e-books
  5 1001 books (total 119)
  1 Dutch Literary Canon (total 23/125)
21 childrens/YA
7 mystery/police prodedural

longest book 1019 pages
shortest book 65 pages
average book 318 pages

--
own books on the shelf since:
before 2008: 9
2008: 2
2017: 1
2018: 1

--
date first published:

19th century: 3

20th century
1910s: 1
1930s: 1
1960s: 5
1970s: 3
1980s: 3
1990s: 6

21st century:
2000s: 6
2010s: 6

--
ratings:
  1 x
  4 x
12 x
12 x
  4 x
  1 x

--
Best books in March


Mijn haat krijgen jullie niet (You Will Not Have My Hate) by Antoine Leiris


Alles stroomt (Everything flows) by Vasili Grossman
Het vuur (Under Fire) by Henri Barbusse
Het teken van Wichart (Flight into Danger) by Alet Schouten
Het roze huis by Pierre Bergounioux

207FAMeulstee
Edited: Apr 1, 6:37am Top

2019 totals to date:

114 books read (31,078 pages, 345.3 pages a day)

own 54 (47 %) / library 59 / other 1

77 male author / 37 female author
36 originally written in Dutch / 78 translated into Dutch
102 fiction / 12 non-fiction

108 books in TIOLI Challenges
38 e-books
12 1001 books (total 119)
  2 Dutch Literary Canon (total 22/125)
40 childrens/YA
18 mystery/police prodedural

longest book 1019 pages
shortest book 32 pages
average book 273 pages

--
own books on the shelf since:
before 2008: 38
2008: 4
2009: 1
2017: 2
2018: 4
2019: 4

--
date first published:
2nd century: 1
17th century: 1
18th century: 1
19th century: 6

20th century
1910s: 1
1920s: 1
1930s: 1
1940s: 2
1950s: 2
1960s: 7
1970s: 8
1980s: 16
1990s: 19

21st century:
2000s: 24
2010s: 24

--
ratings:
  4 x
12 x
40 x
40 x
17 x
  1 x

Group: 75 Books Challenge for 2019

331 members

96,706 messages

About

This topic is not marked as primarily about any work, author or other topic.

Touchstones

Works

Authors

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,754,093 books! | Top bar: Always visible