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PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 6

This is a continuation of the topic PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 5.

75 Books Challenge for 2020

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1PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:06pm Top

This is the time when my mum was probably most happy - when her twin boys were small and she could dress them however she liked! Even then I was able to show my skills on a bicycle and thwart my brother's aim to take a turn.

2PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:10pm Top

POEM

This was written for my Mum: I am keeping this for a 2nd thread as I am still keeping vigil for my mum and video call her every day.

Vigil

I have a sense of keeping vigil;
of waiting I know not what for.
A sense of powerless inaction
as if by keeping score
by keeping tally
of all the things I could have said
and could have done much better;
of all the sons I might have been
if only I had realised that time
would rush too soon
and my mother would lie a-bed
looking for a son last seen
when life had promised a longer tune.

Sleep won't come -
dreamless oblivious sleep
when shadows darken
into the fathomless deep.
She lying in her pain and hope,
in her faith and her fears
and my envoy holds her hand
and blesses her brow with tears.
Goodnight my dear heart
goodnight and take rest
A better peace awaits you soon
Inside this son's breast.

3PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 16, 10:43am Top

BOOKS READ

January

1. Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift (2016) 149 pp - BAC Challenge
2. Paper Aeroplane by Simon Armitage (2014) 232 pp
3. Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson (1985) 171 pp - BAC Challenge
4. The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick by Peter Handke (1970) 133 pp - Nobel winner
5. The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan (2006) 312 pp
6. Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn (1972) 93 pp BAC Challenge
7. I'm Not Scared by Niccolo Ammaniti (2001) 225 pp
8. Death Walks in Eastrepps by Francis Beeding (1931) 252 pp
9. Deaf Republic by Ilya Kaminski (2019) 78 pp
10. Talking to the Dead by Harry Bingham (2012) 377 pp
11. James II : The Last Catholic King by David Womersley (2015) 99 pp
12. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1911) 313 pp
13. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot (1922) 41 pp
14. England and the Aeroplane by David Edgerton (1991) 172 pp

February

15. Loyalties by Delphine de Vigan (2018) 182 pp
16. The World's Two Smallest Humans by Julia Copus (2012) 52 pp
17. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros (1991) 110 pp
18. The History Boys by Alan Bennett (2004) 200 pp BAC Challenge
19. Dregs by Jan Lier Horst (2010) 310 pp
20. On Grand Strategy by John Lewis Gaddis (2018) 313 pp
21. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski (1993) 280 pp
22. The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski (1988) 256 pp
23. Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane (1996) 233 pp BAC Challenge

4PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:15pm Top

Currently Reading:

The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski
Varina by Charles Frazier AAC
Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane BAC
The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett FEB FANTASY

5PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:16pm Top

READING PLAN FOR 2020

I always start out ambitiously but not having made 100 books in the last two years I am going all out to read 20 books a month next year and go well past 200 for the first time since my University days.

20 Categories for 2020 which will also give a nod to my other challenges and longer term projects.

The twenty categories are :

1. British Author Challenge
2. British Poetry
3. Contemporary British Fiction
4. World Poetry
5. 1001 Books
6. Plays
7. American Author Challenge
8. Non-Fiction
9. History
10. Current Affairs
11. Booker Nominees
12. Nobel Winners
13. Scandi
14. Series Books
15. Thrillers/Mystery
16. Classic Fiction
17. 21st Century Fiction
18. World Literature
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy
20. Pot Luck

7PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:19pm Top

AMERICAN AUTHOR CHALLENGE



January Charles Frazier
February Grace Paley
March David McCullough
April Francine Prose
May E. Lynn Harris
June Jean Stafford
July Wendell Berry
August Robert Penn Warren
September Dawn Powell
October Ward Just
November Ann Petry
December Tony Hillerman

8PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:24pm Top

My last decade of reading (probably my worst since I started reading).

Total Books Read : 1,145 books

1 book every 3.2 days

Best Reading Year : 2013 with 157 books

Worst Reading Year : 2019 with 76 books

My Books of the Year on LT:

2011 : Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
2012 : The Road Home by Rose Tremain
2013 : Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes
2014 : Plainsong by Kent Haruf
2015 : Winter King by Thomas Penn
2016 : The Orenda by Joseph Boyden
2017 : The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
2018 : Country Girls by Edna O'Brien
2019 : The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

9PaulCranswick
Edited: Yesterday, 12:51pm Top

Personal Reading Challenge: Every winner of the Booker Prize since its inception in 1969

1969: P. H. Newby, Something to Answer For - READ
1970: Bernice Rubens, The Elected Member
1970: J. G. Farrell, Troubles (awarded in 2010 as the Lost Man Booker Prize) - READ
1971: V. S. Naipaul, In a Free State
1972: John Berger, G.
1973: J. G. Farrell, The Siege of Krishnapur
1974: Nadine Gordimer, The Conservationist ... and Stanley Middleton, Holiday - READ
1975: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Heat and Dust - READ
1976: David Storey, Saville - READ
1977: Paul Scott, Staying On
1978: Iris Murdoch, The Sea, The Sea
1979: Penelope Fitzgerald, Offshore - READ
1980: William Golding, Rites of Passage - READ
1981: Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children - READ
1982: Thomas Keneally, Schindler's Ark - READ
1983: J. M. Coetzee, Life & Times of Michael K
1984: Anita Brookner, Hotel du Lac - READ
1985: Keri Hulme, The Bone People
1986: Kingsley Amis, The Old Devils - READ
1987: Penelope Lively, Moon Tiger - READ
1988: Peter Carey, Oscar and Lucinda
1989: Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day
1990: A. S. Byatt, Possession: A Romance - READ
1991: Ben Okri, The Famished Road
1992: Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient ... and Barry Unsworth, Sacred Hunger - READ
1993: Roddy Doyle, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha
1994: James Kelman, How late it was, how late
1995: Pat Barker, The Ghost Road
1996: Graham Swift, Last Orders - READ
1997: Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things READ
1998: Ian McEwan, Amsterdam - READ
1999: J. M. Coetzee, Disgrace - READ
2000: Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin
2001: Peter Carey, True History of the Kelly Gang - READ
2002: Yann Martel, Life of Pi
2003: DBC Pierre, Vernon God Little
2004: Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty
2005: John Banville, The Sea - READ
2006: Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss
2007: Anne Enright, The Gathering - READ
2008: Aravind Adiga, The White Tiger - READ
2009: Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall - READ
2010: Howard Jacobson, The Finkler Question
2011: Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending - READ
2012: Hilary Mantel, Bring Up the Bodies - READ
2013: Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries
2014: Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North - READ
2015: Marlon James, A Brief History of Seven Killings - READ
2016: Paul Beatty, The Sellout - READ
2017: George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo
2018: Anna Burns, Milkman
2019: Margaret Atwood, The Testaments, and Bernardine Evaristo, Girl, Woman, Other

READ 28 of 55 WINNERS

10PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:29pm Top

NOBELS

Update on my Nobel Prize Winning Reading:
1901 Sully Prudhomme
1902 Theodor Mommsen
1903 Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
1904 Frédéric Mistral and José Echegaray y Eizaquirre
1905 Henryk Sienkiewicz
1906 Giosuè Carducci
1907 Rudyard Kipling - READ
1908 Rudolf Christoph Eucken
1909 Selma Lagerlöf
1910 Paul Heyse --
1911 Count Maurice Maeterlinck
1912 Gerhart Hauptmann
1913 Rabindranath Tagore - READ
1915 Romain Rolland
1916 Verner von Heidenstam
1917 Karl Adolph Gjellerup and Henrik Pontoppidan
1919 Carl Spitteler
1920 Knut Hamsun - READ
1921 Anatole France - READ
1922 Jacinto Benavente
1923 William Butler Yeats - READ
1924 Wladyslaw Reymont
1925 George Bernard Shaw
1926 Grazia Deledda - READ
1927 Henri Bergson
1928 Sigrid Undset
1929 Thomas Mann - READ
1930 Sinclair Lewis - READ
1931 Erik Axel Karlfeldt
1932 John Galsworthy - READ
1933 Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin - READ
1934 Luigi Pirandello - READ
1936 Eugene O'Neill
1937 Roger Martin du Gard
1938 Pearl S. Buck - READ
1939 Frans Eemil Sillanpää
1944 Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
1945 Gabriela Mistral
1946 Hermann Hesse - READ
1947 André Gide - READ
1948 T.S. Elliot - READ
1949 William Faulkner - READ
1950 Bertrand Russell - READ
1951 Pär Lagerkvist - READ
1952 François Mauriac - READ
1953 Sir Winston Churchill - READ
1954 Ernest Hemingway - READ
1955 Halldór Laxness - READ
1956 Juan Ramón Jiménez
1957 Albert Camus - READ
1958 Boris Pasternak (declined the prize) - READ
1959 Salvatore Quasimodo
1960 Saint-John Perse
1961 Ivo Andric - READ
1962 John Steinbeck - READ
1963 Giorgos Seferis
1964 Jean-Paul Sartre (declined the prize) - READ
1965 Michail Sholokhov
1966 Shmuel Yosef Agnon and Nelly Sachs
1967 Miguel Ángel Asturias
1968 Yasunari Kawabata - READ
1969 Samuel Beckett
1970 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn - READ
1971 Pablo Neruda - READ
1972 Heinrich Böll - READ
1973 Patrick White
1974 Eyvind Johnson and Harry Martinson
1975 Eugenio Montale
1976 Saul Bellow - READ
1977 Vincente Aleixandre
1978 Isaac Bashevis Singer - READ
1979 Odysseas Elytis
1980 Czeslaw Milosz
1981 Elias Canetti
1982 Gabriel Garciá Márquez - READ
1983 William Golding - READ
1984 Jaroslav Seifert - READ
1985 Claude Simon - READ
1986 Akinwande Ouwoe Soyinka
1987 Joseph Brodsky - READ
1988 Naguib Mahfouz - READ
1989 Camilo José Cela - READ
1990 Octavio Paz
1991 Nadine Gordimer - READ
1992 Derek Walcott - READ
1993 Toni Morrison - READ
1994 Kenzaburo Oe - READ
1995 Seamus Heaney - READ
1996 Wislawa Szymborska - READ
1997 Dario Fo - READ
1998 José Saramago - READ
1999 Günter Grass
2000 Gao Xingjian
2001 Vidiadhar Surjprasad Naipaul - READ
2002 Imre Kertész - READ
2003 John Maxwell Coetzee - READ
2004 Elfriede Jelinek - READ
2005 Harold Pinter - READ
2006 Orhan Pamuk - READ
2007 Doris Lessing - READ
2008 J.M.G. Le Clézio
2009 Herta Müller - READ
2010 Mario Vargas Llosa - READ
2011 Tomas Tranströmer - READ
2012 Mo Yan
2013 Alice Munro - READ
2014 Patrick Modiano - READ
2015 Svetlana Alexievich - READ
2016 Bob Dylan - READ
2017 Kazuo Ishiguro - READ
2018 Olga Tokarczuk
2019 Peter Handke - READ

READ 64 OF
116 LAUREATES

11PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 5:32pm Top



Another resolution is to keep up in 2020 with all my friends on LT.

12PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:05pm Top

Next is yours

13johnsimpson
Feb 13, 5:06pm Top

Happy new thread mate.

14PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:07pm Top

>13 johnsimpson: Thanks John. That was quick!

15johnsimpson
Feb 13, 5:10pm Top

>14 PaulCranswick:, I am on the ball mate and online while watching the BBC news at Ten and the Boris carnage show.

16PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:11pm Top

>15 johnsimpson: Hahaha, at least he is entertaining!

17johnsimpson
Feb 13, 5:12pm Top

>16 PaulCranswick:, Yes, I've always enjoyed watching clowns.

18PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:14pm Top

>17 johnsimpson: Yes, well John, it could be a 5-year circus!

19johnsimpson
Feb 13, 5:17pm Top

>18 PaulCranswick:, ha ha ha, Time for bed and a bit of reading before lights out.

20PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:20pm Top

>19 johnsimpson: Good night, John, it is 6.20 am here and I have been awake for nearly two hours already!

Don't forget your pot of tea!

21Storeetllr
Feb 13, 5:22pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul! Fun pic up top - you and your bro were so damn cute! And the looks on your faces! (Or, what I imagine the look on yours was from the side view: stunned disbelief on your bros. and smug satisfaction on yours?)

22richardderus
Feb 13, 5:25pm Top

Happy new thread, Cranswickulus, and may BoJo and 45 die in the flaming meteor crash NASA warned us about for Saturday.

23PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:26pm Top

>21 Storeetllr: I would guess steely determination in replacement for smug satisfaction Mary!

24amanda4242
Feb 13, 5:26pm Top

Happy new thread!

25PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:27pm Top

>22 richardderus: Hah! Thanks RD. Always on the ball with novel policy prescriptions.

26PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:27pm Top

>24 amanda4242: Thank you, dear Amanda.

27weird_O
Feb 13, 5:29pm Top

So you are 13 hours ahead of those of us who live in the Eastern Time Zone. The time stamp on your post (>20 PaulCranswick:) is 5:20 pm and you say it is 6:20 am where you are. Is that correct. Or does the International Dateline screw that up?

I honestly don't know. Yeah, and too indolent to look it up.

28PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:31pm Top

>27 weird_O: Yes Bill. It is now 6.30 am here and it is showing 5.29 pm as the time of your post.

29FAMeulstee
Feb 13, 5:33pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul!

>1 PaulCranswick: What age were you and your twin in that photo?

30PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 5:36pm Top

>29 FAMeulstee: Thanks Anita. I would be guessing but three or four, I guess.

31avatiakh
Feb 13, 6:02pm Top

Lunchtime here in NZ. Cute photo of you and your brother up top.

32PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 6:04pm Top

>31 avatiakh: I always have to remember that you are in front of me whilst most of our pals are behind!

33quondame
Feb 13, 6:46pm Top

Happy new thread!

34msf59
Feb 13, 6:47pm Top

Happy New Thread, Paul! Love the topper! You were the original Easy Rider!

35RebaRelishesReading
Feb 13, 6:49pm Top

I didn't know you're a twin! Happy new thread.

36alcottacre
Feb 13, 6:50pm Top

Checking in on the new thread, Paul!

37harrygbutler
Feb 13, 6:55pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul.

38jessibud2
Feb 13, 7:24pm Top

Love that topper pic! I am guessing you are not identical with the different hair colours.

Happy new thread, Paul.

39Storeetllr
Feb 13, 7:46pm Top

>23 PaulCranswick: Steely determination works too, Paul.

40BLBera
Feb 13, 7:48pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul. Love the topper.

41PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:13pm Top

>33 quondame: Thanks Susan.

>34 msf59: Thank you, Mark. I will settle for Peter Fonda, I guess!

42PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:15pm Top

>35 RebaRelishesReading: Thanks Reba. If you have seen the movie, I am DeVito to my brother Arnold. xx

>36 alcottacre: Thank you, Stasia. I am loving that you are more active again this year; the group has sorely missed your energy and warmth. x

43figsfromthistle
Feb 13, 8:16pm Top

Somehow missed the fact that you started a new thread and already 42 posts behind!

Happy new one!

44PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:16pm Top

>37 harrygbutler: Thank you, Harry.

>38 jessibud2: It is funny, Shelley, because I don't remember Peter ever being that blond. He is greyer than I am now so I suppose we have similar hair colours at last! He still has about 4 inches in height on me though.

45PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:21pm Top

>39 Storeetllr: There was always a fair bit of competition between the two of us growing up - my mum tells about us having high chairs from which we used to be fed. I apparently was in the habit of stealing his food after doing a successful strategy of distracting him. I don't know why though as I was still not able to catch up to him height wise!

>40 BLBera: Thanks Beth. When I was back in the UK, I spent my nights in my Mum's house and went through some of the cupboards looking at old photos and letters etc.

I found a series of love letters between my mum and a gentleman from Pennsylvania. I told my mum that I had found them (to be fair I didn't read them once I realised what they were) and she brought me up close and whispered to me; "burn them".

46bell7
Feb 13, 8:22pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul! I'm late commenting on your stats from the last thread, but it's nice to see I'm holding my own in the 30s. Busier than that on my thread would be hard for me to keep up with to be honest. And I have a few days off over the next two weeks, so my reading numbers should stay respectable as well.

47PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:23pm Top

>43 figsfromthistle: In fairness, Anita, the thread is only three hours old! Lovely to have you drop by. x

48PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:38pm Top

>46 bell7: I have commented on it before Mary, but you are remarkably consistent posting wise. We are normally fairly close in reading numbers.

49bell7
Feb 13, 8:45pm Top

>48 PaulCranswick: It is remarkably consistent, even on "down" years for the 75ers. This is the fastest I've reached a second thread, I believe (last year was also quick, but February 20). There have been quite a few years you and I were neck and neck in reading numbers, though if your pace keeps up you'll soon leave me in the dust in 2020!

50laytonwoman3rd
Feb 13, 8:46pm Top

Another fast-moving Cranswickian thread, I see!

51PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 8:52pm Top

>49 bell7: Well to be fair you have toasted me reading wise for the last two years!

>50 laytonwoman3rd: I am happy, Linda, when the posts are singing!

52PaulCranswick
Feb 13, 9:29pm Top

Hopefully I will get another weekend full of reading and the four currently underway will surely get finished by then.

I have almost finished the Bukowski collection which is earthy, irritable and occasionally rambunctious.

53PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 13, 10:38pm Top

Pulitzer Winners

As with the Bookers, I want to eventually read all the Pulitzer winners (for fiction at least) and have most of the recent ones on the shelves at least. Current status.

Fiction

1918 HIS FAMILY - Ernest Poole
1919 THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS - Booth Tarkington
1921 THE AGE OF INNOCENCE - Edith Wharton
1922 ALICE ADAMS - Booth Tarkington
1923 ONE OF OURS - Willa Cather
1924 THE ABLE MCLAUGHLINS - Margaret Wilson
1925 SO BIG - Edna Ferber
1926 ARROWSMITH - Sinclair Lewis (Declined)
1927 EARLY AUTUMN - Louis Bromfield
1928 THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY - Thornton Wilder
1929 SCARLET SISTER MARY - Julia Peterkin
1930 LAUGHING BOY - Oliver Lafarge ON SHELVES
1931 YEARS OF GRACE - Margaret Ayer Barnes
1932 THE GOOD EARTH - Pearl Buck
1933 THE STORE - Thomas Sigismund Stribling
1934 LAMB IN HIS BOSOM - Caroline Miller
1935 NOW IN NOVEMBER - Josephine Winslow Johnson
1936 HONEY IN THE HORN - Harold L Davis
1937 GONE WITH THE WIND - Margaret Mitchell ON SHELVES
1938 THE LATE GEORGE APLEY - John Phillips Marquand
1939 THE YEARLING - Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
1940 THE GRAPES OF WRATH - John Steinbeck
1942 IN THIS OUR LIFE - Ellen Glasgow
1943 DRAGON'S TEETH - Upton Sinclair
1944 JOURNEY IN THE DARK - Martin Flavin
1945 A BELL FOR ADANO - John Hersey ON SHELVES
1947 ALL THE KING'S MEN - Robert Penn Warren ON SHELVES
1948 TALES OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC - James Michener
1949 GUARD OF HONOR - James Gould Cozzens
1950 THE WAY WEST - A.B. Guthrie
1951 THE TOWN - Conrad Richter
1952 THE CAINE MUTINY - Herman Wouk
1953 THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA - Ernest Hemingway
1955 A FABLE - William Faulkner
1956 ANDERSONVILLE - McKinlay Kantor
1958 A DEATH IN THE FAMILY - James Agee ON SHELVES
1959 THE TRAVELS OF JAIMIE McPHEETERS - Robert Lewis Taylor
1960 ADVISE AND CONSENT - Allen Drury
1961 TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD - Harper Lee
1962 THE EDGE OF SADNESS - Edwin O'Connor
1963 THE REIVERS - William Faulkner
1965 THE KEEPERS OF THE HOUSE - Shirley Ann Grau
1966 THE COLLECTED STORIES OF KATHERINE ANNE PORTER - Katherine Anne Porter
1967 THE FIXER - Bernard Malamud
1968 THE CONFESSIONS OF NAT TURNER - William Styron
1969 HOUSE MADE OF DAWN - N Scott Momaday ON SHELVES
1970 THE COLLECTED STORIES OF JEAN STAFFORD - Jean Stafford
1972 ANGLE OF REPOSE - Wallace Stegner ON SHELVES
1973 THE OPTIMIST'S DAUGHTER - Eudora Welty ON SHELVES
1975 THE KILLER ANGELS - Jeff Shaara ON SHELVES
1976 HUMBOLDT'S GIFT - Saul Bellow
1978 ELBOW ROOM - James Alan McPherson
1979 THE STORIES OF JOHN CHEEVER - John Cheever ON SHELVES
1980 THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG - Norman Mailer ON SHELVES
1981 A CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES - John Kennedy Toole ON SHELVES
1982 RABBIT IS RICH - John Updike
1983 THE COLOR PURPLE - Alice Walker ON SHELVES
1984 IRONWEED - William Kennedy ON SHELVES
1985 FOREIGN AFFAIRS - Alison Lurie ON SHELVES
1986 LONESOME DOVE - Larry McMurtry ON SHELVES
1987 A SUMMONS TO MEMPHIS - Peter Taylor
1988 BELOVED - Toni Morrison - ON SHELVES
1989 BREATHING LESSONS - Anne Tyler
1990 THE MAMBO KINGS PLAY SONGS OF LOVE - Oscar Hijuelos
1991 RABBIT AT REST - John Updike
1992 A THOUSAND ACRES - Jane Smiley
1993 A GOOD SCENT FROM A STRANGE MOUNTAIN - Robert Olen Butler
1994 THE SHIPPING NEWS - E Annie Proulx
1995 THE STONE DIARIES - Carol Shields ON SHELVES
1996 INDEPENDENCE DAY - Richard Ford ON SHELVES
1997 MARTIN DRESSLER - Steven Millhauser ON SHELVES
1998 AMERICAN PASTORAL - Philip Roth ON SHELVES
1999 THE HOURS - Michael Cunningham ON SHELVES
2000 INTERPRETER OF MALADIES - Jumpha Lahiri
2001 THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER & CLAY - Michael Chabon ON SHELVES
2002 EMPIRE FALLS - Richard Russo ON SHELVES
2003 MIDDLESEX - Jeffrey Eugenides ON SHELVES
2004 THE KNOWN WORLD - Edward P. Jones ON SHELVES
2005 GILEAD - Marilynne Robinson ON SHELVES
2006 MARCH - Geraldine Brooks
2007 THE ROAD - Cormac McCarthy ON SHELVES
2008 THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO - Junot Diaz ON SHELVES
2009 OLIVE KITTERIDGE - Elizabeth Strout ON SHELVES
2010 TINKERS - Paul Harding
2011 A VISIT FROM THE GOOD SQUAD - Jennifer Egan ON SHELVES
2013 ORPHAN MASTER'S SON - Adam Johnson ON SHELVES
2014 THE GOLDFINCH - Donna Tartt ON SHELVES
2015 ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE - Anthony Doerr ON SHELVES
2016 THE SYMPATHIZER - Viet Thanh Nguyen ON SHELVES
2017 THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD - Colson Whitehead ON SHELVES
2018 LESS - Andrew Sean Greer ON SHELVES
2019 THE OVERSTORY - Richard Powers ON SHELVES


15 READ
38 ON SHELVES
39 NOT OWNED OR READ

92 TOTAL

54Storeetllr
Feb 13, 10:41pm Top

Huh, I've actually read 6 of the Pulitzer winners and enjoyed them all! For some reason, I'm surprised. I think this year I'll try to read the winner from 1948, the year I was born, just for the fun of it. I've read Michener before and enjoyed it.

55Copperskye
Edited: Feb 14, 12:41am Top

Happy new thread, Paul!

>1 PaulCranswick: Adorable!!!!

I’ve managed to read 19 on the list. I plan on rereading two of them, The Shipping News and The Stone Diaries. Two other favorites are Angle of Repose and Breathing Lessons.

>54 Storeetllr: Maybe I’ll join you in reading Tales of the South Pacific. I’ve owned it for years. I’ve never heard of my birth year winner.

56quondame
Feb 14, 1:15am Top

>53 PaulCranswick: I've read 13, all from before 1988. It shows how little attention I've paid to literary fiction as an adult - only Beloved and The Color Purple were read between my high school graduation and my joining LT, since when I've read The Optimist's Daughter because it was a short book with leaves on the cover.

57PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 14, 1:25am Top

>54 Storeetllr: That is one that I don't yet own, Mary. I will hunt it down at some stage this year.

>55 Copperskye: Thanks Joanne. I think my mum must have had fun picking up those outfits but knowing Peter and I, they wouldn't have stayed clean very long.

19 is a decent number.

58PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 1:26am Top

>56 quondame: As you can see my reading is also not much up to speed, Susan. I own 23 of the last 24 winners but have only read 2 of them!

59quondame
Feb 14, 1:29am Top

>58 PaulCranswick: Some have become classics, some popular, and some I've never heard of - is there anywhere there is a modern evaluation of which ones remain worth reading, and perhaps why?

60PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 1:44am Top

>59 quondame: That is an interesting question, Susan. I don't know but I will try to find out.

61PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 14, 1:51am Top

>59 quondame: Well this isn't scientific and it is only one man's opinion but he had read all 90 winners (2 years ago).

I think that Beloved, To Kill a Mocking Bird and The Grapes of Wrath are top five will give a little bit of credence to the list but to place Shipping News as low as number 85 is a bit harsh as I actually liked the book.

http://meadowparty.com/blog/2018/04/16/ranking-the-pulitzer-prize-for-fiction-wi...

62quondame
Edited: Feb 14, 2:48am Top

>61 PaulCranswick: Thanks! I know it's inevitably subjective, and while Gone with the Wind may have seemed much more substantial when it was printed than it does now, it remains a real page turner, whereas The Optimist's Daughter seems ever so slight. Of course a lot of whose on the list is dependent on what came out in a given year and who would or wouldn't be considered.
I loved his Rabbit remarks!
___
I just noticed Olive Kitteridge which I'd rank higher than 60, but then I have a fondness for old (untamed) shrews. So 14 for sure and a couple of maybes.
___
I got to The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which, as the wife of a comic book collector, I have read without intercession of LT. So, 15.

63mahsdad
Feb 14, 2:18am Top

Happy New Thread!

Pulitzers (and Hugos) are about the only official "planned" reading I do. I'm currently reading Underground Railroad, just read Bridge of San Luis Rey. I'm sitting at 29 lifetime.

Have a Great Weekend!

64drneutron
Feb 14, 2:58am Top

Happy new thread!

65SirThomas
Feb 14, 3:49am Top

Happy new thread, Paul.
And all the best for aou and yours.

66Ameise1
Feb 14, 3:56am Top

Happy new thread, Paul.

68PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 14, 5:13am Top

>63 mahsdad: Thanks Jeff. 29 is a decent number!

>64 drneutron: Thanks Jim

69PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 5:14am Top

>65 SirThomas: Thank you, Thomas

>66 Ameise1: Thanks, Barbara. Nice to see you here as always.

70PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 7:52am Top

For the Pulitzer Other Prizes

Biography : 102 awards 1 read a further 9 owned

General Non-Fiction : 60 awards : 2 read a further 4 owned

History : 100 awards : 1 read a further 2 owned

Poetry : 98 awards : 5 read a further 6 owned

Drama : 88 awards : 2 read a further 3 owned

In total there have been 540 Pulitzer Prizes in 6 categories

I have read a paltry 26

I own a further 62

71mckait
Feb 14, 8:57am Top

>45 PaulCranswick: Regarding your mum's letters.. I hope you don't mind if my response is Good for her! :)

72karenmarie
Feb 14, 8:57am Top

Happy new thread, Paul, and very cute pic of you and your brother.

>45 PaulCranswick: I found a series of love letters between my mum and a gentleman from Pennsylvania. I told my mum that I had found them (to be fair I didn't read them once I realised what they were) and she brought me up close and whispered to me; "burn them". Your mum has the right idea. Makes me realize I should start going through things.

>53 PaulCranswick: 21 read, 13 on shelves, 58 not owned or read. Also, 3 Pulitzer Prize Finalists read and 2 more Finalists on my shelves to be read.

73PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 8:59am Top

>71 mckait: To be honest, Kath, I thought pretty much the same thing!

>72 karenmarie: Ooh I didn't check the finalists, Karen!

74PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 9:04am Top

>72 karenmarie: I calculate 81 nominees in the fiction section that didn't win

I have read 12 and own a further 20.

75karenmarie
Feb 14, 9:04am Top

>73 PaulCranswick: And, of course, there's nonfiction... other categories, too. I'm not going to spend any more time this morning on this, but it's all wonderful.

76PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 9:05am Top

>75 karenmarie: Yes and I will avoid looking at the other nominated non-winners in the other sections - for a while at least, Karen!

77Coffee.Cat
Feb 14, 9:40am Top



Happy Valentine's Day!

78mahsdad
Feb 14, 11:22am Top

>67 PaulCranswick: See that's what's fun about a list like this. I've read 29, but only about half of the 15 that you've read that you've read. So much good reading to go.

79LizzieD
Edited: Feb 14, 11:45am Top

Hi, Paul. Looks as though I've read 23 of the Pulitzers. I 'm busy looking up the winner from my birth year, Journey in the Dark, apparently a thumping good read and long out of print.
I wish you a good weekend!

80PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 11:48am Top

>77 Coffee.Cat: Thank you Abigail!

>78 mahsdad: Hats off to the fellow that had read them all. Dedication. I reckon that I will add a few this year to my 15 read.

81PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 11:52am Top

>79 LizzieD: My birth year winner would be the Collected Stories of Katherine Anne Porter which I haven't seen in any of the shops.

82Crazymamie
Feb 14, 11:54am Top

Happy new one, Paul - I am late to the party. Love the topper photo - priceless!

83PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 16, 10:43am Top

BOOK # 22



The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowskii

Date of Publication : 1988
Origin : USA
Pages : 256 pp

Dissolution

Long legged whores,
discarded beer cans
in thin-walled walk-ups.

Dog shit on already
dirty sidewalks; November
grimaces a tepid sun

Bukowski's words
smeared across greasy pages -
a stain somehow approaching poetry.

84PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 16, 10:51am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 1/12
2. British Poetry - 2/12 - The World's Two Smallest Humans by Julia Copus
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 2/12 - The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski
5. 1001 Books - 1/12
6. Plays - 2/12 - The History Boys by Alan Bennett
7. American Author Challenge 0/12
8. Non-Fiction - 1/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 2/12 On Grand Strategy by John Lewis Gaddis
11. Booker Nominees - 0/12
12. Nobel Winners - 1/12
13. Scandi - 1/12 - Dregs by Jan Lier Horst
14. Series Books - 1/12
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12 - Loyalties by Delphine de Vigan
18. World Literature - 1/12 -
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 1/12 - The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski
20. Pot Luck - 2/12 - The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

Books Completed February - 8 Year to Date - 22
Pages Read February - 1,703 Year to Date - 4,360
1001 Books February - 0 Year to Date - 2
Bookers February - 0 Year to Date - 0
Nobel Winners February - 0 Year to Date - 2
BAC Books February - 1 Year to Date - 4
AAC Books February - 0 Year to Date - 0

Daily Reading Ave February - 121.65 Year to Date - 96.89

Gender of Authors 5 Female / 16 male

85PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 12:12pm Top

>82 Crazymamie: Not so late, Mamie, we are less than a day into the new one!

86mahsdad
Feb 14, 12:38pm Top

>81 PaulCranswick: Yeah me too. If you ever find it, send it to me when you're done. I'll do the same.

87mahsdad
Feb 14, 12:40pm Top

>83 PaulCranswick: Bukowski, lived and died in San Pedro (my town), he's buried in a local cemetery here. I need to read more of his stuff.

88RebaRelishesReading
Feb 14, 12:48pm Top

I've read all of the Pulitzer fiction winners except The Overstory which is on my shelves but not yet read. I found it interesting to see how different the early winners were from the later ones. Of those from the last 20 years my favorites are Empire Falls, Gilead, and March. Earlier ones I liked were The Age of Innocence, Grapes of Wrath, Tales of the South Pacific, To Kill a Mockingbird and Lonesome Dove (which was a surprise because I don't generally like "westerns". Anyway, enjoy the journey Paul :)

89richardderus
Feb 14, 1:19pm Top

>83 PaulCranswick: *moué of distaste*

Happy Friday-shading-into-Saturday!

90Storeetllr
Edited: Feb 14, 2:21pm Top

>55 Copperskye: Let's do it, Jo. I'll see if I can find a copy, and we can plan it. Out of curiosity, what was your birth year winner?

>45 PaulCranswick: >72 karenmarie: Good idea. I think I'd better go thru my boxes of memorabilia with a blowtorch handy.

>88 RebaRelishesReading: Holy moley, Reba. That's a pretty stunning feat! Congrats!

Hi, Paul!

ETA >89 richardderus: Agree.

91PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 6:21pm Top

>86 mahsdad: There are a few of the winners which seem a little bit difficult to track down Jeff.

>87 mahsdad: He is well worth a read but his focus can be largely on ladies of the night and drinking until oblivion.

92PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 6:23pm Top

>88 RebaRelishesReading: Wow I am impressed, Reba - all of 'em?!

>89 richardderus: Yeah, I figured that he wouldn't quite be your thing, RD. He does make a few reference to the intention to rape in some of the poems which is extremely disquieting.

93PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 14, 6:29pm Top

A duplicate post.

I kept the last one because I had edited it to add something.

Now reading Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane which is much more to my liking.

94PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 6:27pm Top

>90 Storeetllr: Hi right back, Mary.

You will see from my somewhat throwaway poem in lieu of a full review of the collection that Bukowski isn't quite my favourite. He hits upon phrases occasionally that resound but he can clunk and clang a lot too. He seemed to have an extremely dissolute attitude to sex and women in particular.

"A stain somehow approaching poetry" is hardly a glowing endorsement!

95PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 7:11pm Top

One laudable point about the Pulitzer Prize for fiction is the prominence given to female authors in its infancy. 12 of the first 24 recipients were ladies and 30 overall out of 92 have been female. This contrasts very favourably with other awards such as The Nobel Prize where only 15 of 116 winners have been ladies.

The Booker Prize has awarded 19 of 55 winners to ladies.

Booker Prize 34.55% awarded to female authors
Pulitzer Prize
(fiction) 32.61%
Nobel Prize 12.93%

96brenzi
Feb 14, 9:24pm Top

I've read 36 of the Pulitzers Paul and I have several of those I haven't read on my shelf so I'm going to try to get to a few of those at least this year. I'm thinking of The Color Purple and The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. My favorite is Lonesome Dove and I doubt that will ever change.

97PaulCranswick
Feb 14, 9:34pm Top

>96 brenzi: I have read the other two books in the original trilogy, Bonnie, Comanche Moon and Dead Man's Walk, but not yet Lonesome Dove.

98humouress
Feb 15, 12:08am Top

Happy new thread Paul! And happy weekend.

We’re staying indoors for the nonce; anyway, lots of activities are curtailed perforce.

>1 PaulCranswick: >21 Storeetllr: Pretty much what I was thinking. :0)

>45 PaulCranswick: As long as you don’t tell the whole world in the meantime ;0)

99weird_O
Edited: Feb 15, 12:11am Top

Drat! I got lost today in Distractionsville and didn't get any book-reading accomplished.

Then, I say, THEN...I drive into the Pulitzer Prize muck, and now I'm really stuck. I've got a list, but totals are out of date. I bin stuck good, so I'll now have to do an accounting. Well, tomorrow.

I do have 50+ winners lurking in the bowels of TBR, including fiction, general nonfiction, history, bio, drama. No poetry that I see. I have chosen to award the 1974 fiction Pulitzer to Thomas Pynchon for Gravity's Rainbow, and it is amongst those TBRs. A pox on the Columbia U. trustees.

So...until tomorrow. Adios!

100weird_O
Feb 15, 1:43am Top

My Pulitzer stats:

I've read 43 fiction winners*, 12 general NF winners, 8 history winners, 11 bio winners, 4 drama winners, and 1 poetry winner.

TRBs: 26 fiction**, 10 gnf, 3 history, 13 bio, and 2 drama.

*I, in my wisdom, have spurned the Columbia U. trustees and count as winners For Whom the Bell Tolls in 1941; The Adventures of Augie March in 1954, and A River Runs Through It in 1977. I have read these.

**I, in my continuing wisdom, have spurned the Columbia U. trustees and count as the 1974 winner Gravity's Rainbow. It is among the TBRs.

101quondame
Edited: Feb 15, 2:29am Top

>99 weird_O: >100 weird_O: I know lots of people, including my husband, who own Gravity's Rainbow, and no one who has completed it. Really, 1974 should have something people would actually read to consider. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance or if that isn't considered fiction Ragtime or The Milagro Beanfield War even.

102charl08
Feb 15, 2:43am Top

>95 PaulCranswick: I think this is more about looking good by comparison than actually being good, Paul.

I look away from the threads for a day and find you've almost finished a brand new one!

103paulstalder
Feb 15, 2:47am Top

Wish you a good weekend

104PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 2:58am Top

>98 humouress: There is a fair bit of hysteria over here too with everybody wearing those ugly masks - one poor fellow returned from Europe to the project site on Thursday and he wasn't allowed to take lunch with anybody else!

>99 weird_O: I am quite surprised that I have 62 unread Pulitzer winners on the shelves.

105PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 3:01am Top

>100 weird_O: 77 reads is impressive, Bill. Almost three times my number although I am ahead of you in 1 category only which is poetry.

>101 quondame: I can agree with that, Susan. I thought that Ragtime was an excellent novel. I have Gravity's Rainbow on the shelves and haven't plucked up the courage yet either.

106PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 3:11am Top

>102 charl08: You could be right, Charlotte.

In fairness to the Nobel committee outstanding female candidates don't spring to mind that readily:

Virginia Woolf certainly
Simone de Beauvoir
Iris Murdoch
Anna Akhmatova
Margaret Atwood of the living writers

whilst
Zola, Ibsen, Strindberg, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Hardy, Forster, Orwell, Borges, Amado, Fuentes, Achebe, Greene, Arthur Miller, Kundera, Calvino, Nabokov etc may have felt hard done to.

107PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 15, 3:11am Top

>103 paulstalder: Same to you, Paul.

108BekkaJo
Feb 15, 3:40am Top

>105 PaulCranswick: Oddly enough I'm struggling a little with Ragtime at the moment - though I suspect that is more me than the book. If you see what I mean...

Wishing you a peaceful weekend.

109DianaNL
Feb 15, 5:43am Top

That's a precious topper, Paul.

Have a good weekend!

110PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 6:28am Top

>108 BekkaJo: I remember really enjoying the novel, Bekka, but then again I am getting old and my memory is not what it was!

>109 DianaNL: I spoke to Peter on the phone earlier, Diana, and I have to tell you that I kept seeing that photo in my mind's eye.

111msf59
Feb 15, 7:05am Top

Happy Weekend, Paul. You have a lot of choice Pulitzer winners to read. Glad you have most on shelf. Goon Squad, THE ORPHAN MASTER'S SON and The Overstory were all excellent, among several more of those.

112PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 7:46am Top

>111 msf59: I will definitely knock off a few of the winners this year, Mark.

113EllaTim
Feb 15, 8:10am Top

>1 PaulCranswick: As older sister to three younger brothers, I couldn't help but feel sorry for Peter! I probably would have made you share, sorry Paul;-)

Wishing you a good weekend!

Interesting discussion about those Pulitzers. I was very much impressed with The Grapes of Wrath, should do a reread.

114PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 8:13am Top

>113 EllaTim: He has more than compensated for missing out on that bike ride, Ella. He was showing me his new Lamborghini when I was back in the UK. I wouldn't have dared take a turn.

115karenmarie
Feb 15, 8:38am Top

I read Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 and was pretty much crying by the end. Thank God my edition was only 160 pages. I still have Mason & Dixon on my shelves but at 784 pages and LibraryThing's "Will You Like It?" function saying LibraryThing thinks you probably won't like Mason & Dixon: A Novel (prediction confidence: very high), I think I have another book to add to my culled list for 2020.

116PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 8:49am Top

>115 karenmarie: I am worried about getting through Pynchon for the 1001 Books challenge. A few and mostly really long and difficult.

117m.belljackson
Feb 15, 11:09am Top

>100 weird_O: >105 PaulCranswick:

For impressive NF Pulitzer History, you guys might want to give PARTING THE WATERS a nice solid try.

118alcottacre
Feb 15, 11:44am Top

>95 PaulCranswick: I find it interesting that so many of the Pulitzer Prize winning authors are women, especially in the early years of the prize.

I would like to read the Pulitzer Prize winners for nonfiction at some point. Maybe in the next couple of years I will get around to it.

119RebaRelishesReading
Feb 15, 12:24pm Top

>90 Storeetllr:, >92 PaulCranswick: Well thank you :) I finished up a couple of years ago and thought I would move on to the Pulitzer biographies but I'm not doing so well on that score. It was a fun challenge and I hope to keep current (although I still haven't read last year's winner and there will be a new one soon). Just keep at it and you'll get there :)

120jnwelch
Feb 15, 12:48pm Top

Happy "New" Thread, Paul. I'm glad I caught up with you before the next one started!

121arubabookwoman
Feb 15, 1:27pm Top

I’ve read 58 of the Pulitzer’s. Of the ranking lists Top 25, I really liked most of those I’ve read, and they would probably end up near the top of my list were I to make one, EXCEPT, Empire Falls and All the Light We Cannot See, which I found meh or just ok. (In the top 25 I haven’t read The Orphan Master’s Son, Underground Railroad, and Elbow Room, and I can’t remember if I’ve read The Reivers.)
In the bottom 25 on the ranking, there were a lot of the older winners which I haven’t read, but I really liked and would rank much higher A Thousand Acres and Updike’s Rabbit books.
I hope your mom is comfortable, and I’m glad you get to video with her every day. Also glad that Kyran and Yasmine got to visit.

122Storeetllr
Feb 15, 1:50pm Top

>96 brenzi: I LOVED Lonesome Dove, Bonnie, and I'm not much one for Westerns either. I haven't read The Color Purple, or seen the film (don't @ me for it), but The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao was a favorite the year I read it.

123Familyhistorian
Feb 15, 6:59pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul. I seem to be way behind in threads. Happy to read the stats on your last one, although I seem to be falling a bit in the posting standings but that is not a huge surprise. I can remember when you used to have a separate lists of stats for the Canadian threads but I don't think there are as many of us these days.

Re the increase in votes for Sinn Fein in the Irish election. I think that was inevitable given Brexit.

124foggidawn
Feb 15, 9:14pm Top

Happy new thread!

125fairywings
Feb 15, 9:30pm Top

Happy new thread Paul.

126EBT1002
Feb 15, 9:32pm Top

Hi Paul. I love the topper of you and your brother -- not surprised to see you on the bike. :-)

I'm "borrowing" the Pulitzer list. I like the idea of reading all the fiction winners.

127PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 10:12pm Top

>117 m.belljackson: Actually, Marianne, I think I have seen that in the stores here. Will go and look it up.

>118 alcottacre: I think it was quite amazing given both the superior numbers of books published by men at the time that 12 of the first 24 winners were by ladies.

128PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 10:14pm Top

>119 RebaRelishesReading: I have checked and most of them can be bought on Book Depo although a couple of them are really expensive.

>120 jnwelch: I am glad too, Joe, as I wouldn't want to have a thread you didn't drop by to. Have you read any Charles Bukowski?

129PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 10:22pm Top

>121 arubabookwoman: Yes I didn't agree with the list entirely. I enjoyed Breathing Lessons, A Thousand Acres and The Shipping News.

>122 Storeetllr: I will start increasing the number of Pulitzer winners and I'll try to knock off ten in the fiction award which will give me a more respectable number.

130PaulCranswick
Edited: Feb 15, 10:36pm Top

>123 Familyhistorian: Well that is a very good point, Meg. Why are our Canadian chums deserting us in droves?
Is it the Northern air? RL suddenly so much more complete and fulfilling in Nova Scotia over New England?

Deb, Valerie, Ilana, Nancy, Faith, Megan, Judy (category challenge) - a magnificent seven not seen with thread this year. :(

Just for you. Top 7 Candadian threads as of 30 minutes ago

1. Meg (overall 11th) 566 posts
2. Chelle (overall 20th) 311 posts
3. Sandy (overall 22nd) 301 posts
4. Anita (overall 25th) 279 posts
5. Shelley (overall 28th) 244 posts
6. Micky (overall 43rd) 179 posts
7. Lori (overall 50th) 150 posts

>124 foggidawn: Thanks Foggil

131PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 10:37pm Top

>125 fairywings: Thank you, Adrienne. x

>126 EBT1002: Be my pleasure, Ellen. I am quite sure others must have it as one of their challenges. Can you read them all before retirement!!?

132humouress
Edited: Feb 15, 10:47pm Top

>117 m.belljackson: >127 PaulCranswick: Don’t encourage him! You know he’ll come back with five more.

133PaulCranswick
Feb 15, 11:59pm Top

>132 humouress: I am a book buying addict - what can I say?

134PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 10:22am Top

I have some rather astonishing news:

The day before yesterday with my mum more weak and ailing the doctor removed the tube which was giving her her liquid sustenance - somehow - and they don't seem to be able to explain how - the little that is left of her bowel kicked in and started working again.

It is very early days but she is showing distinct signs of recovery. Called and spoke to her just now and she was sitting up in bed with Kyran removing the polish from her nails. I am quite flabbergasted and grateful and emotional and frankly stunned.

I want to say a big big thank you for everyone who has said a little prayer for her or gave her and me good wishes as good wishes and positive energy does sometimes have an impact. I am convinced that SWMBO somehow got her better.

135jessibud2
Feb 16, 10:48am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: - {{hugs}} to you all, Paul. Some things simply can't be explained by any *logical* means. When my mum was first diagnosed with her lymphoma, her doctor prepared us for the worst, and had us understand that there is no cure. And that seniors her age (86 now, 83, at that time) did not usually live longer than a year or two, though she also made it clear that she was NOT giving us a *timeline*. A year later, when chemo did not work, and my mum once again weakened, we took a collective deep breath... and here she is, 3 years in, and still hanging in. And we are grateful. So good that you can video call and see and speak to her regularly.

136PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 10:50am Top

Book #23



Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane

Date Published : 1996
Origin of Author : UK
Pages : 233 pp
British Author Challenge

Growing up a Catholic boy on the tough streets of Derry in the immediate post war period. The hero of our story comes from a family steeped in the history of the Troubles and the tale slowly unfolds an interwoven family connection that hides grave and tragic secrets.

Well written and emotionally taut, I would recommend this book.

137richardderus
Feb 16, 10:51am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Here's to hoping for this to be the trend! Happy for you.

138PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 10:54am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12 - Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane
2. British Poetry - 2/12 - The World's Two Smallest Humans by Julia Copus
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 2/12 - The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski
5. 1001 Books - 1/12
6. Plays - 2/12 - The History Boys by Alan Bennett
7. American Author Challenge 0/12
8. Non-Fiction - 1/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 2/12 On Grand Strategy by John Lewis Gaddis
11. Booker Nominees - 0/12
12. Nobel Winners - 1/12
13. Scandi - 1/12 - Dregs by Jan Lier Horst
14. Series Books - 1/12
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12 - Loyalties by Delphine de Vigan
18. World Literature - 1/12 -
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 1/12 - The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski
20. Pot Luck - 2/12 - The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

Books Completed February - 9 Year to Date - 23
Pages Read February - 1,936 Year to Date - 4,593
1001 Books February - 0 Year to Date - 2
Bookers February - 0 Year to Date - 0
Nobel Winners February - 0 Year to Date - 2
BAC Books February - 2 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books February - 0 Year to Date - 0

Daily Reading Ave February - 121.00 Year to Date - 97.72

Gender of Authors 5 Female / 17 male

139PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 10:57am Top

>135 jessibud2: Yes, Shelley, no explaining things sometimes. She looked so frail and I had never thought of my mum as being brave. She was always grumbling about one ailment or another and almost seemed vindicated when cancer arrived, or pneumonia struck again. She has proved me completely wrong and I am so proud of my brave, resilient and loving mother.

>137 richardderus: Thank you RD. I don't want to get my hopes up too much too soon - she is after all still in hospice.

140Caroline_McElwee
Feb 16, 11:00am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Extraordinary Paul. Continuing to hold you all in my thoughts.

141PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 11:08am Top

>140 Caroline_McElwee: Thank you, Caroline. She was that animated in bed that I had to caution her not to fall out of it!

142laytonwoman3rd
Feb 16, 11:58am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: The human body and spirit are amazing and so much is still unknown about how it all works. Treasure every joyous moment.

143weird_O
Feb 16, 12:48pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Great news, Paul.

144m.belljackson
Edited: Feb 16, 1:30pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick:

Your Mum beating new odds is really comforting, Paul!

Both Malaysia (related to Cambodia cruise ship) and Britain are in today's coronavirus alerts -
hope to hear Good News about that too.

145kac522
Edited: Feb 16, 1:49pm Top

>1 PaulCranswick: Darling topper, Paul; and wonderful news re: you mum. I think you are right that Hani has made a difference.

Re: Pulitzers--I've read 19 on your list, and have some waiting to be read on my shelves.

Of the books you haven't read (but don't own), I would recommend:
--The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
--One of Ours, Willa Cather (set during WWI)
--The Good Earth, Pearl S. Buck

Of the books on your shelves, I'd recommend:
--All the King's Men, Robert Penn Warren
--Angle of Repose, Wallace Stegner (amazing writing)
--All the Light We Cannot See, Anthony Doerr -- very good, not great, but a very fast and entertaining read, that gives one hope for humankind

146quondame
Feb 16, 2:17pm Top

What brilliant news about your mother. Many wishes for her sustained recovery!

147paulstalder
Feb 16, 3:42pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: great news


wish you a good new week

148VivienneR
Feb 16, 4:30pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Wonderful news! A spell of happiness is good news no matter how long or short it might be. I'm hoping for the best for Vivienne.

149PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 5:36pm Top

>142 laytonwoman3rd: I certainly intend to treasure my mum more, Linda, if we are granted the gift of having her longer with us.

>143 weird_O: Thank you, Bill.

150PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 5:40pm Top

>144 m.belljackson: Malaysia is a little hysterical about the virus to be honest, Marianne. I can see that memos will be coming around today that we all need to wear masks.

>145 kac522: Thank you, Kathy,

Actually I have read The Age of Innocence and The Good Earth but not One of Ours - all these lists do get confusing don't they?

I will certainly read one or two of those this year.

151PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 5:41pm Top

>146 quondame: Thank you, Susan. One day at a time.

>147 paulstalder: Thanks Paul. My mum does love flowers.

152PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 5:42pm Top

>148 VivienneR: Thank you Vivienne - her namesake's best wishes I am sure will be effective! xx

153brenzi
Feb 16, 6:00pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Wonderful Paul! I'm so happy for you all.

154PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 6:02pm Top

>153 brenzi: Thanks Bonnie. I wouldn't say that I am a hugely religious person, but sometimes you wonder how on earth things happen.

155banjo123
Feb 16, 6:36pm Top

Such good news about your mother, Paul!

156amanda4242
Feb 16, 6:43pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: That's fantastic news!!!

157figsfromthistle
Feb 16, 7:04pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: What great news!

158PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 7:05pm Top

>155 banjo123: It is indeed, Rhonda. Cautiously so, I hasten to add.

>156 amanda4242: Thanks Amanda. I am still walking on air.

159PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 7:05pm Top

>157 figsfromthistle: Thank you, Anita. xx

160thornton37814
Feb 16, 8:35pm Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Good news! Praying for her continued improvement.

161PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 8:44pm Top

>160 thornton37814: Thank you, Lori. I do feel so blessed this morning.

162PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 8:47pm Top

Reading Update:

I have started Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk and am enjoying it very much so far. Quirky but fascinating.

I am also struggling on with Varina by Charles Frazier. I think that I chose the wrong book by Frazier. I must admit that I don't like the constant switching backwards and forwards in time in the narrative. As soon as I get interested in part of it, it seems to send me somewhere else and my interest wanes. I also must say that the majority of the characters are not fully formed at all. I do wish I'd read Nightwoods as the reviews are more stellar.

163PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 8:54pm Top

Oh and I missed some book buying therapy at the beginning of the weekend:

26. The Watch by Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya (2012) 310 pp
27. The Memoir of an Anti-Hero by Kornel Filipowicz (1961) 70 pp
28. Darius the Great is not Okay by Adib Khorram (2018) 312 pp
29. The Night Tiger by Yangsze Choo (2019) 466 pp
30. Love Story, With Murders by Harry Bingham (2013) 441 pp

164PaulCranswick
Feb 16, 8:56pm Top

165Donna828
Feb 16, 10:14pm Top

Hi Paul, I love that picture of you and your twin brother. Like you mother, my happiest days were when my children were younger and at home. Too bad I didn't realize it at the time as I was too busy keeping them fed and in clean clothes.

>53 PaulCranswick: That Pulitzer List is amazing. So many good books. I've read 41 of them so far. I think the books are more accessible to the casual reader than the Booker List, or perhaps it just seems that way to me as they are aimed more at American readers since the authors are from the USA.

>54 Storeetllr: Mary, my copy of Tales of the South Pacific has a copyright date of 1947. I guess it won the Pulitzer the following year. I have pulled it from one of my shelves to read for my Bingo square to read a book published in your year of birth. Dang, I'm getting old!

>134 PaulCranswick: That is wonderful news about your mother's improvement. I hope the trend continues. It's hard to keep a good woman down!

166PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 12:19am Top

>165 Donna828: My mum's own words is that she was most happy when Peter and I were growing up.

Yes I think you are right about availability in the main, although there are a few of the Pulitzer fiction winners pre WW2 that are not easy to find at a decent price now.

The Pulitzer winners are usually awarded to the best fiction written in the previous year so therefore it would be normal for something written in 1947 to win the prize in 1948. That is because the winners are awarded early the following year (in April 2020 we will find out the winners for 2019 but it will be the 2020 Prize, if that makes any sense). The Booker is awarded later in the year and is for books published in the UK that year.

I prefer the Pulitzer method as it gives readers more chance to have read more of the contenders but of course, just to be contrary, the Pulitzer does not announce it's shortlist in advance.

I'll keep my fingers and toes crossed, Donna, that my mum's recovery is a constant one.

167karenmarie
Yesterday, 8:20am Top

Hi Paul!

Great news about your mum.

>162 PaulCranswick: I read a few of the LT reviews of Varina after your comments, and they’re all over the place. I might pick up a copy if I see one at my local thrift shops or the FoL sale in April. Sorry it’s giving you fits.

168Crazymamie
Yesterday, 8:47am Top

The news about your mum is so full of fabulous - hoping she continues to improve.

>164 PaulCranswick: Nice haul - I loved Love Story With Murders. I need to get back to that series - I have read the first three, I think.

169ChelleBearss
Yesterday, 8:59am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: That is wonderful news! Hope she continues along this path to recovery!

170PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 11:22am Top

>167 karenmarie: It really isn't one I'm enjoying too much, Karen. I don't hate it but it doesn't grab me much either.

>168 Crazymamie: Seemed still better today and was reading to me from the newspaper. She is capable of some strange comments though - she warned me against travelling to Wales today because of the floods and advised that I should take a dinghy if really I had to go there. A little bizarre!

171PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 11:22am Top

>169 ChelleBearss: It is amazing, Chelle and the doctors are also a bit dumbfounded.

172harrygbutler
Edited: Yesterday, 11:38am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Wonderful news about your mother, Paul — here's hoping for continued improvement!

173PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 11:43am Top

>172 harrygbutler: Thanks Harry. It is great to have good news to post for a change!

174benitastrnad
Yesterday, 12:54pm Top

>162 PaulCranswick:
That seems to be the consensus about Varina on this side of the pond as well. If you are struggling with it, I would advise just Pearl Rule it. There are other book that are more worth your time.

175m.belljackson
Yesterday, 12:57pm Top

>164 PaulCranswick:

DARIUS THE GREAT IS NOT OKAY (Touchstone?)
is one of the best YA books out - I learned a lot from his travels!

176PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 1:01pm Top

>174 benitastrnad: I am sorely tempted but I am 150 pages in already, Benita, and don't like to waste those numbers!

>175 m.belljackson: The blurb does look really good, Marianne.

177Foxen
Yesterday, 1:39pm Top

Catching up on threads - happy new year! I'm enjoying all of the prizewinner threads!

178PaulCranswick
Yesterday, 2:09pm Top

>177 Foxen: Nice to see you here, Katie. Happy new year right back. I went into a restaurant this evening and saw that they still had their Christmas Tree up, so happy new years are definitely still on!

179Storeetllr
Yesterday, 6:33pm Top

>163 PaulCranswick: Love the Fiona Griffiths series, Paul! So far I've read all of them and am eagerly awaiting the next. Love Story with Murders wasn't my favorite, but it was enjoyable nonetheless. Bingham is one of my (few) read-anything-he-writes-as-soon-as-possible-after-it's-been-published authors.

>165 Donna828: >166 PaulCranswick: That's interesting about the way they award the Pulitzers to books published the prior year. I guess I was just a twinkle in my parents' eyes when South Pacific was published. (Donna, you do know that 70 is the new 40, right? So you are definitely not getting old. Because if you are, that means I am too, and I refuse to accept that!)

Glad to hear about your mom's improved health. May it be a first step to complete recovery, because medicine is an art as much as a science, and the medicos don't always get it right.

180alcottacre
Yesterday, 6:40pm Top

>136 PaulCranswick: Adding that one to the BlackHole.

>163 PaulCranswick: Yay for book buying therapy!

I am praying your mother continues to improve!

181PaulCranswick
Edited: Today, 2:23am Top

>179 Storeetllr: I certainly enjoyed the first instalment Mary and now have the next two on the shelves. I spent the evening last night sorting through my shelves (well stacks really) in order to set aside my likely leads. There are so many great series that I may not have time for another "Fiona Griffiths" this year.

70 is definitely not to be considered old these days!

>180 alcottacre: I don't think I could survive without a little book buying therapy on a regular basis.

182BekkaJo
Today, 3:09am Top

>134 PaulCranswick: Everything crossed and sending many many good healing vibes/hopes/wishes.

I may have turned the corner on Ragtime - one particular scene may me squeak last night, so it's definitely getting a reaction.

183PaulCranswick
Today, 4:35am Top

>182 BekkaJo: Yikes, I don't remember squeaking! I do remember liking it though, Bekka.

Thanks as always for your kind wishes. xx

184charl08
Edited: Today, 8:30am Top

So glad to read your mum is doing so well - hope she continues to feel better.

I loved Cold Mountain but have never picked up anything else by him (you're not selling me on Varina!)

185m.belljackson
Today, 11:17am Top

Hey Paul - it's getting to the end of February, the 1990s month,
and I'm recalling a trade offer that I would join
(and I now have abe.com books through June!)
you on BAC if you read about a certain young wizard.

How's that going?

186Storeetllr
Today, 2:08pm Top

There are so many great series that I may not have time for another "Fiona Griffiths" this year.

I get that, Paul, but there's always time for a Fiona Griffiths. Besides, they are such fast reads (at least for me, because I love them so much I don't stop for much of anything until I've finished them), that they barely impinge on one's reading schedule. ;)

187streamsong
Edited: Today, 3:59pm Top

Hi Paul - I'm so glad your mom is feeling better!

Thanks for the interesting Pulitzer novels list. I've read 20 so far - far more from the recent years as I've taken comments to heart from LT. I don't really follow the list - I was surprised that several of the ones I've read were winners.

I think I'll try to pick up the ones starting at the bottom of the list that I haven't read - the first would be The Underground Railroad and then The Goldfinch. Surely I can get two read in 2020, right?

ETA: The next lit seminar book is The Flights by Olga Tokarczuk so I'll knock off another Nobel winner, too

188quondame
Today, 4:27pm Top

>187 streamsong: Your author for Flights is different than you touchstone!

189mckait
Today, 5:21pm Top

Good to hear that your mum is rallying ! Good for her !

190RebaRelishesReading
Today, 5:54pm Top

>187 streamsong: IMHO, there are a lot of great books that have won Pulitzers, The Underground Railroad is one and The Goldfinch is not.

191benitastrnad
Today, 6:25pm Top

>190 RebaRelishesReading:
I still haven't finished reading The Goldfinch and I am about 400 pages into it. I just can't bring myself to like the characters or the story. I don't just give up on it, because I think I should finish it, but it just sits there. Staring at me. Making me feel guilty.

192PaulCranswick
Today, 6:31pm Top

>184 charl08: No Charlotte, I am disappointed in Varina and because it is for the AAC it has stalled my other reading somewhat.
My mum continues to improve.

>185 m.belljackson: The wizard is untouched Marianne!

193PaulCranswick
Today, 6:35pm Top

>186 Storeetllr: I agree with that Mary. If I stopped reading everything else and just concentrated on my series reading my stats would definitely soar.........an idea maybe!

>187 streamsong: I am enjoying her book Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead so I will knock off another Nobel winner very shortly too, Janet.

194PaulCranswick
Today, 6:36pm Top

>188 quondame: I also realised that I have that book on the shelves and haven't catalogued it yet!

>189 mckait: I really do think that there is something in the power of positive energy, Kath. xx

195PaulCranswick
Today, 6:38pm Top

>190 RebaRelishesReading: Yes Reba, I can play that too. The Fixer is one but Tinkers is not.

>191 benitastrnad: Hahaha Benita certain books make us guilty for not liking them don't they? I am a bit like that with Varina and haven't Pearl'd it for the same reason.

196m.belljackson
Today, 7:47pm Top

>192 PaulCranswick:

Well, at least he's in your possession so no one will send you a Howler!

198bell7
Today, 9:04pm Top

Glad to hear the tentative good news on your mom, and that she continues to improve!

199PaulCranswick
Today, 9:06pm Top

>198 bell7: Yes Mary. So far so very good.

200humouress
Today, 9:50pm Top

That’s good news about your mum, Paul. I hope she continues to rally.

>150 PaulCranswick: Conversely, in Singapore we get constant reminders not to wear masks unless we’re not well. Apparently they’re not effective at preventing you getting sick (especially as you then constantly touch your face to adjust the mask) but help stop you spreading germs if you sneeze or cough. Of course, there’s also the fact that they’re either sold out or extremely expensive if they are available.

201PaulCranswick
Today, 10:54pm Top

>200 humouress: Yes, I am anti-mask already Nina. I have a decent supply but an unused decent supply.

202torontoc
Today, 11:03pm Top

Great news about your mother!

Group: 75 Books Challenge for 2020

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