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PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 9

This is a continuation of the topic PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 8.

This topic was continued by PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 10.

75 Books Challenge for 2020

Join LibraryThing to post.

1PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 2:41pm Top



My son, Kyran, in brooding form.

2PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 21, 2:53pm Top

Poem

This is somehow fitting for the moment. It is the last part of the poem Mayakovsky taken from Frank O'Hara's collection "Meditations in an Emergency"

Now I am quietly waiting for
the catastrophe of my personality
to seem beautiful again,
and interesting, and modern.

The country is grey and
brown and white in trees,
snows and skies of laughter
always diminishing, less funny
not just darker, not just grey.

It may be the coldest day of
the year, what does he think of
that? I mean, what do I? And if I do,
perhaps I am myself again.

3PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:14pm Top

BOOKS READ

January

1. Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift (2016) 149 pp - BAC Challenge
2. Paper Aeroplane by Simon Armitage (2014) 232 pp
3. Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson (1985) 171 pp - BAC Challenge
4. The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick by Peter Handke (1970) 133 pp - Nobel winner
5. The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan (2006) 312 pp
6. Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn (1972) 93 pp BAC Challenge
7. I'm Not Scared by Niccolo Ammaniti (2001) 225 pp
8. Death Walks in Eastrepps by Francis Beeding (1931) 252 pp
9. Deaf Republic by Ilya Kaminski (2019) 78 pp
10. Talking to the Dead by Harry Bingham (2012) 377 pp
11. James II : The Last Catholic King by David Womersley (2015) 99 pp
12. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1911) 313 pp
13. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot (1922) 41 pp
14. England and the Aeroplane by David Edgerton (1991) 172 pp

February

15. Loyalties by Delphine de Vigan (2018) 182 pp
16. The World's Two Smallest Humans by Julia Copus (2012) 52 pp
17. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros (1991) 110 pp
18. The History Boys by Alan Bennett (2004) 200 pp BAC Challenge
19. Dregs by Jan Lier Horst (2010) 310 pp
20. On Grand Strategy by John Lewis Gaddis (2018) 313 pp
21. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski (1993) 280 pp
22. The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski (1988) 256 pp
23. Reading in the Dark by Seamus Deane (1996) 233 pp BAC Challenge
24. As it Was by Fred Trueman (2004) 397 pp
25. The Siege of Krishnapur by J.G. Farrell (1973) 314 pp BOOKER WINNER
26. Varina by Charles Frazier (2018) 353 pp AAC
27. A Timbered Choir by Wendell Berry (1998) 216 pp AAC

March

28. Past Tense by Lee Child (2018) 461 pp
29. Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk (2009) 266 pp NOBEL
30. Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar (2014) 155 pp
31. The Road by Cormac McCarthy (2006) 287 pp PULITZER
32. Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger (2018) 255 pp
33. Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara (1957) 52 pp
34. The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli (2013) 183 pp
35. Ivanov by Anton Chekhov (1887) 58 pp
36. Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson (2010) 252 pp
37. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (1811) 374 pp
38. The English Civil War by David Clark (2008) 154 pp
39. The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner (1996) 280 pp
40. The Librarian by Salley Vickers (2018) 385 pp
41. The Holy Fox by Andrew Roberts (1991) 414 pp

4PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 21, 3:00pm Top

Currently reading

5PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:23pm Top

READING PLAN FOR 2020

I always start out ambitiously but not having made 100 books in the last two years I am going all out to read 20 books a month next year and go well past 200 for the first time since my University days.

20 Categories for 2020 which will also give a nod to my other challenges and longer term projects.

The twenty categories are :

1. British Author Challenge
2. British Poetry
3. Contemporary British Fiction
4. World Poetry
5. 1001 Books
6. Plays
7. American Author Challenge
8. Non-Fiction
9. History
10. Current Affairs
11. Booker Nominees
12. Nobel Winners
13. Scandi
14. Series Books
15. Thrillers/Mystery
16. Classic Fiction
17. 21st Century Fiction
18. World Literature
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy
20. Pot Luck

7PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:47pm Top

8PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:49pm Top

Personal Reading Challenge: Every winner of the Booker Prize since its inception in 1969

1969: P. H. Newby, Something to Answer For - READ
1970: Bernice Rubens, The Elected Member
1970: J. G. Farrell, Troubles (awarded in 2010 as the Lost Man Booker Prize) - READ
1971: V. S. Naipaul, In a Free State
1972: John Berger, G.
1973: J. G. Farrell, The Siege of Krishnapur - READ
1974: Nadine Gordimer, The Conservationist ... and Stanley Middleton, Holiday - READ
1975: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Heat and Dust - READ
1976: David Storey, Saville - READ
1977: Paul Scott, Staying On
1978: Iris Murdoch, The Sea, The Sea
1979: Penelope Fitzgerald, Offshore - READ
1980: William Golding, Rites of Passage - READ
1981: Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children - READ
1982: Thomas Keneally, Schindler's Ark - READ
1983: J. M. Coetzee, Life & Times of Michael K
1984: Anita Brookner, Hotel du Lac - READ
1985: Keri Hulme, The Bone People
1986: Kingsley Amis, The Old Devils - READ
1987: Penelope Lively, Moon Tiger - READ
1988: Peter Carey, Oscar and Lucinda
1989: Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day
1990: A. S. Byatt, Possession: A Romance - READ
1991: Ben Okri, The Famished Road
1992: Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient ... and Barry Unsworth, Sacred Hunger - READ
1993: Roddy Doyle, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha
1994: James Kelman, How late it was, how late
1995: Pat Barker, The Ghost Road
1996: Graham Swift, Last Orders - READ
1997: Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things READ
1998: Ian McEwan, Amsterdam - READ
1999: J. M. Coetzee, Disgrace - READ
2000: Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin
2001: Peter Carey, True History of the Kelly Gang - READ
2002: Yann Martel, Life of Pi
2003: DBC Pierre, Vernon God Little
2004: Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty
2005: John Banville, The Sea - READ
2006: Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss
2007: Anne Enright, The Gathering - READ
2008: Aravind Adiga, The White Tiger - READ
2009: Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall - READ
2010: Howard Jacobson, The Finkler Question
2011: Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending - READ
2012: Hilary Mantel, Bring Up the Bodies - READ
2013: Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries
2014: Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North - READ
2015: Marlon James, A Brief History of Seven Killings - READ
2016: Paul Beatty, The Sellout - READ
2017: George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo
2018: Anna Burns, Milkman
2019: Margaret Atwood, The Testaments, and Bernardine Evaristo, Girl, Woman, Other

READ 29 of 55 WINNERS

9PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:50pm Top

Pulitzer Winners

As with the Bookers, I want to eventually read all the Pulitzer winners (for fiction at least) and have most of the recent ones on the shelves at least. Current status.

Fiction

1918 HIS FAMILY - Ernest Poole
1919 THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS - Booth Tarkington
1921 THE AGE OF INNOCENCE - Edith Wharton
1922 ALICE ADAMS - Booth Tarkington
1923 ONE OF OURS - Willa Cather
1924 THE ABLE MCLAUGHLINS - Margaret Wilson
1925 SO BIG - Edna Ferber
1926 ARROWSMITH - Sinclair Lewis (Declined)
1927 EARLY AUTUMN - Louis Bromfield
1928 THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY - Thornton Wilder
1929 SCARLET SISTER MARY - Julia Peterkin
1930 LAUGHING BOY - Oliver Lafarge ON SHELVES
1931 YEARS OF GRACE - Margaret Ayer Barnes
1932 THE GOOD EARTH - Pearl Buck
1933 THE STORE - Thomas Sigismund Stribling
1934 LAMB IN HIS BOSOM - Caroline Miller
1935 NOW IN NOVEMBER - Josephine Winslow Johnson
1936 HONEY IN THE HORN - Harold L Davis
1937 GONE WITH THE WIND - Margaret Mitchell ON SHELVES
1938 THE LATE GEORGE APLEY - John Phillips Marquand
1939 THE YEARLING - Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
1940 THE GRAPES OF WRATH - John Steinbeck
1942 IN THIS OUR LIFE - Ellen Glasgow
1943 DRAGON'S TEETH - Upton Sinclair
1944 JOURNEY IN THE DARK - Martin Flavin
1945 A BELL FOR ADANO - John Hersey ON SHELVES
1947 ALL THE KING'S MEN - Robert Penn Warren ON SHELVES
1948 TALES OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC - James Michener
1949 GUARD OF HONOR - James Gould Cozzens
1950 THE WAY WEST - A.B. Guthrie
1951 THE TOWN - Conrad Richter
1952 THE CAINE MUTINY - Herman Wouk
1953 THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA - Ernest Hemingway
1955 A FABLE - William Faulkner
1956 ANDERSONVILLE - McKinlay Kantor
1958 A DEATH IN THE FAMILY - James Agee ON SHELVES
1959 THE TRAVELS OF JAIMIE McPHEETERS - Robert Lewis Taylor
1960 ADVISE AND CONSENT - Allen Drury
1961 TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD - Harper Lee
1962 THE EDGE OF SADNESS - Edwin O'Connor
1963 THE REIVERS - William Faulkner
1965 THE KEEPERS OF THE HOUSE - Shirley Ann Grau
1966 THE COLLECTED STORIES OF KATHERINE ANNE PORTER - Katherine Anne Porter
1967 THE FIXER - Bernard Malamud
1968 THE CONFESSIONS OF NAT TURNER - William Styron
1969 HOUSE MADE OF DAWN - N Scott Momaday ON SHELVES
1970 THE COLLECTED STORIES OF JEAN STAFFORD - Jean Stafford
1972 ANGLE OF REPOSE - Wallace Stegner ON SHELVES
1973 THE OPTIMIST'S DAUGHTER - Eudora Welty ON SHELVES
1975 THE KILLER ANGELS - Jeff Shaara ON SHELVES
1976 HUMBOLDT'S GIFT - Saul Bellow
1978 ELBOW ROOM - James Alan McPherson
1979 THE STORIES OF JOHN CHEEVER - John Cheever ON SHELVES
1980 THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG - Norman Mailer ON SHELVES
1981 A CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES - John Kennedy Toole ON SHELVES
1982 RABBIT IS RICH - John Updike
1983 THE COLOR PURPLE - Alice Walker ON SHELVES
1984 IRONWEED - William Kennedy ON SHELVES
1985 FOREIGN AFFAIRS - Alison Lurie ON SHELVES
1986 LONESOME DOVE - Larry McMurtry ON SHELVES
1987 A SUMMONS TO MEMPHIS - Peter Taylor
1988 BELOVED - Toni Morrison - ON SHELVES
1989 BREATHING LESSONS - Anne Tyler
1990 THE MAMBO KINGS PLAY SONGS OF LOVE - Oscar Hijuelos
1991 RABBIT AT REST - John Updike
1992 A THOUSAND ACRES - Jane Smiley
1993 A GOOD SCENT FROM A STRANGE MOUNTAIN - Robert Olen Butler
1994 THE SHIPPING NEWS - E Annie Proulx
1995 THE STONE DIARIES - Carol Shields ON SHELVES
1996 INDEPENDENCE DAY - Richard Ford ON SHELVES
1997 MARTIN DRESSLER - Steven Millhauser ON SHELVES
1998 AMERICAN PASTORAL - Philip Roth ON SHELVES
1999 THE HOURS - Michael Cunningham ON SHELVES
2000 INTERPRETER OF MALADIES - Jumpha Lahiri
2001 THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER & CLAY - Michael Chabon ON SHELVES
2002 EMPIRE FALLS - Richard Russo ON SHELVES
2003 MIDDLESEX - Jeffrey Eugenides ON SHELVES
2004 THE KNOWN WORLD - Edward P. Jones ON SHELVES
2005 GILEAD - Marilynne Robinson ON SHELVES
2006 MARCH - Geraldine Brooks
2007 THE ROAD - Cormac McCarthy
2008 THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO - Junot Diaz ON SHELVES
2009 OLIVE KITTERIDGE - Elizabeth Strout ON SHELVES
2010 TINKERS - Paul Harding
2011 A VISIT FROM THE GOOD SQUAD - Jennifer Egan ON SHELVES
2013 ORPHAN MASTER'S SON - Adam Johnson ON SHELVES
2014 THE GOLDFINCH - Donna Tartt ON SHELVES
2015 ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE - Anthony Doerr ON SHELVES
2016 THE SYMPATHIZER - Viet Thanh Nguyen ON SHELVES
2017 THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD - Colson Whitehead ON SHELVES
2018 LESS - Andrew Sean Greer ON SHELVES
2019 THE OVERSTORY - Richard Powers ON SHELVES


16 READ
37 ON SHELVES
39 NOT OWNED OR READ

92 TOTAL

10PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:51pm Top

NOBELS

Update on my Nobel Prize Winning Reading:
1901 Sully Prudhomme
1902 Theodor Mommsen
1903 Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
1904 Frédéric Mistral and José Echegaray y Eizaquirre
1905 Henryk Sienkiewicz
1906 Giosuè Carducci
1907 Rudyard Kipling - READ
1908 Rudolf Christoph Eucken
1909 Selma Lagerlöf
1910 Paul Heyse --
1911 Count Maurice Maeterlinck
1912 Gerhart Hauptmann
1913 Rabindranath Tagore - READ
1915 Romain Rolland
1916 Verner von Heidenstam
1917 Karl Adolph Gjellerup and Henrik Pontoppidan
1919 Carl Spitteler
1920 Knut Hamsun - READ
1921 Anatole France - READ
1922 Jacinto Benavente
1923 William Butler Yeats - READ
1924 Wladyslaw Reymont
1925 George Bernard Shaw
1926 Grazia Deledda - READ
1927 Henri Bergson
1928 Sigrid Undset
1929 Thomas Mann - READ
1930 Sinclair Lewis - READ
1931 Erik Axel Karlfeldt
1932 John Galsworthy - READ
1933 Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin - READ
1934 Luigi Pirandello - READ
1936 Eugene O'Neill
1937 Roger Martin du Gard
1938 Pearl S. Buck - READ
1939 Frans Eemil Sillanpää
1944 Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
1945 Gabriela Mistral
1946 Hermann Hesse - READ
1947 André Gide - READ
1948 T.S. Elliot - READ
1949 William Faulkner - READ
1950 Bertrand Russell - READ
1951 Pär Lagerkvist - READ
1952 François Mauriac - READ
1953 Sir Winston Churchill - READ
1954 Ernest Hemingway - READ
1955 Halldór Laxness - READ
1956 Juan Ramón Jiménez
1957 Albert Camus - READ
1958 Boris Pasternak (declined the prize) - READ
1959 Salvatore Quasimodo
1960 Saint-John Perse
1961 Ivo Andric - READ
1962 John Steinbeck - READ
1963 Giorgos Seferis
1964 Jean-Paul Sartre (declined the prize) - READ
1965 Michail Sholokhov
1966 Shmuel Yosef Agnon and Nelly Sachs
1967 Miguel Ángel Asturias
1968 Yasunari Kawabata - READ
1969 Samuel Beckett
1970 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn - READ
1971 Pablo Neruda - READ
1972 Heinrich Böll - READ
1973 Patrick White
1974 Eyvind Johnson and Harry Martinson
1975 Eugenio Montale
1976 Saul Bellow - READ
1977 Vincente Aleixandre
1978 Isaac Bashevis Singer - READ
1979 Odysseas Elytis
1980 Czeslaw Milosz
1981 Elias Canetti
1982 Gabriel Garciá Márquez - READ
1983 William Golding - READ
1984 Jaroslav Seifert - READ
1985 Claude Simon - READ
1986 Akinwande Ouwoe Soyinka
1987 Joseph Brodsky - READ
1988 Naguib Mahfouz - READ
1989 Camilo José Cela - READ
1990 Octavio Paz
1991 Nadine Gordimer - READ
1992 Derek Walcott - READ
1993 Toni Morrison - READ
1994 Kenzaburo Oe - READ
1995 Seamus Heaney - READ
1996 Wislawa Szymborska - READ
1997 Dario Fo - READ
1998 José Saramago - READ
1999 Günter Grass
2000 Gao Xingjian
2001 Vidiadhar Surjprasad Naipaul - READ
2002 Imre Kertész - READ
2003 John Maxwell Coetzee - READ
2004 Elfriede Jelinek - READ
2005 Harold Pinter - READ
2006 Orhan Pamuk - READ
2007 Doris Lessing - READ
2008 J.M.G. Le Clézio
2009 Herta Müller - READ
2010 Mario Vargas Llosa - READ
2011 Tomas Tranströmer - READ
2012 Mo Yan
2013 Alice Munro - READ
2014 Patrick Modiano - READ
2015 Svetlana Alexievich - READ
2016 Bob Dylan - READ
2017 Kazuo Ishiguro - READ
2018 Olga Tokarczuk - READ
2019 Peter Handke - READ

READ 65 OF
116 LAUREATES

11PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:48pm Top

My last decade of reading (probably my worst since I started reading).

Total Books Read : 1,145 books

1 book every 3.2 days

Best Reading Year : 2013 with 157 books

Worst Reading Year : 2019 with 76 books

My Books of the Year on LT:

2011 : Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
2012 : The Road Home by Rose Tremain
2013 : Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes
2014 : Plainsong by Kent Haruf
2015 : Winter King by Thomas Penn
2016 : The Orenda by Joseph Boyden
2017 : The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
2018 : Country Girls by Edna O'Brien
2019 : The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

12PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 21, 3:17pm Top



Another resolution is to keep up in 2020 with all my friends on LT.

13PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 10:52pm Top

2020 ADDITIONS

These are the books that I have added this year. My new rule is that any book I buy I should read before the end of the following year!

1. Submarine by Joe Dunthorne (2008) 290 pp
2. I Heard the Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven (1967) 158 pp
3. The Ascent of Rum Doodle by W.E. Bowman (1956) 171 pp
4. The Spare Room by Helen Garner (2008) 195 pp
5. Look We have Coming to Dover! by Dajit Nagra (2007) 53 pp
6. Hame by Annalina McAfee (2017) 577 pp
7. The Holy Fox by Andrew Roberts (1991) 414 pp READ MAR 20
8. The History Boys by Alan Bennett (2004) 200 pp READ FEB 20
9. Himself by Jess Kidd (2016) 358 pp
10. Lazarus by Morris West (1990) 375 pp
11. Judith Paris by Hugh Walpole (1931) 757 pp
12. The Small House at Allington by Anthony Trollope (1864) 665 pp
13. The Seventh Cross by Anna Seghers (1942) 398 pp
14. The Gallows Pole by Benjamin Myers (2017) 363 pp
15. The Unwomanly Face of War by Svetlana Alexievich (1985) 331 pp
16. The Light Years by Elizabeth Jane Howard (1990) 578 pp
17. Eight Hours from England by Anthony Quayle (1945) 228 pp
18. Dregs by Jorn Lier Horst (2010) 310 pp READ FEB 20
19. Loyalties by Delphine de Vigan READ FEB 20
20. The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli READ MAR 20
21. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski (1993) 280 pp READ FEB 20
22. War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans (2013) 293 pp
23. Deviation by Luce D'Eramo (1979) 344 pp
24. Caging Skies by Christine Leunens (2019) 294 pp
25. The Hunters by James Salter (1956) 233 pp
26. The Watch by Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya (2012) 310 pp
27. The Memoir of an Anti-Hero by Kornel Filipowicz (1961) 70 pp
28. Darius the Great is not Okay by Adib Khorram (2018) 312 pp
29. The Night Tiger by Yangsze Choo (2019) 466 pp
30. Love Story, With Murders by Harry Bingham (2013) 441 pp
31. Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen by Fay Weldon
32. Selected Poems: 1950-2012 by Adrienne Rich
33. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn
34. Divided : Why We're Living in an Age of Walls by Tim Marshall
35. The Cold War by John Lewis Gaddis
36. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
37. Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger READ MAR 20
38. Lucy Church, Amiably by Gertrude Stein
39. Shadow Tag by Louise Erdrich
40. The Village Witch Doctor and Other Stories by Amos Tutuola
41. After You'd Gone by Maggie O'Farrell
42. The Librarian by Salley Vickers READ MAR 20
43. Temple of a Thousand Faces by John Shors
44. Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler (1993) 311 pp
45. The Drought by J.G. Ballard (1965) 233 pp
46. The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker (2012) 391 pp
47. Clade by James Bradley (2017) 297 pp
48. Far North by Marcel Theroux (2009) 288 pp
49. The River by Peter Heller (2019) 253 pp
50. Ivanov by Anton Chekhov (1887) 58 pp READ MAR 20
51. The Sea-Gull by Anton Chekhov (1896) 50 pp
52. Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov (1900) 44 pp
53. The Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov (1901) 58 pp
54. The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov (1904) 50 pp
55. The Females by Wolfgang Hilbig (2010) 129 pp
56. The Other Americans by Laila Lalami (2019) 301 pp

56 books added
9 already finished

14BekkaJo
Mar 21, 2:43pm Top

I just want to sneak in whilst you are setting up. It feels very naughty though...

15PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 2:43pm Top

Next is yours

16PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 2:44pm Top

>14 BekkaJo: Hahaha Bekka, you just beat me to it......naughty young lady!

17jessibud2
Mar 21, 3:06pm Top

Happy new one, Paul. Kyran looks contemplative, not brooding. ;-)

18PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 3:10pm Top

>17 jessibud2: Knowing him, Shelley, he is probably contemplating his next meal!

19figsfromthistle
Mar 21, 3:22pm Top

Happy new one!

20amanda4242
Mar 21, 3:23pm Top

Happy new thread!

21PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 3:26pm Top

>19 figsfromthistle: Thank you, Anita.

>20 amanda4242: Thanks, Amanda. xx

22avatiakh
Mar 21, 4:12pm Top

Hi Paul - you are reading a storm at moment.

23m.belljackson
Mar 21, 4:27pm Top

Hey, Paul - responding to your question, "What to do?" toward the end of your last thread:

Get Outta Dodge would be the logical message, but, as someone once wrote - "Where to go?"

24richardderus
Mar 21, 4:40pm Top

>18 PaulCranswick: Don't you wish we could still be that way...contemplating what, not whether, to eat? *pats ample latitude*

25quondame
Mar 21, 5:09pm Top

Happy new thread. Handsome fellow, that Kyran.

It seems I barely have time to greet each new thread before another gets tacked one. I hope you and yours continue well.

26AMQS
Mar 21, 5:38pm Top

Hello Paul, so nice to see your lovely children atop your past couple threads! I once thought dreamily of self-quarantine as a leisurely period of reading and puzzling but as you know my reality is much, much different. Hope your mother fares well. Is Hani still there?

27banjo123
Mar 21, 6:17pm Top

happy new thread, Paul!

28FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 7:34pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul!

29PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 8:31pm Top

>22 avatiakh: Thanks Kerry. I can be Suz and Lori and Anita and......you for a short while with this lockdown!

>23 m.belljackson: Yes you are right. I think staying put is also an option at the moment. I have food, my daughter, my wonderful maid, space, air-con and books......and you all too.

30PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 8:35pm Top

>24 richardderus: Well yes I do, RD, especially as my latitudes are probably the more ample!

>25 quondame: I told myself that I would change threads every 250 posts this year as I see it as the ideal number but I haven't managed to do that once yet. I mean I have to think f a topper and a poem (I'm nowhere near prolific enough these days that I could put one of my own up there too regularly) and then set out the 10 other or so posts which I keep up there for reminders, etc.
I couldn't manage your once a quarter plan, Susan, but I do understand it! xx

31PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 8:38pm Top

>26 AMQS: Our realities are quite different aren't they? I do have to work a little from home but it probably takes up an hour of my day and I pity your 15 hour days that you've struggled through recently to keep the kids of Colorado with an education these next weeks.
The kids look so much better than me up there!

>27 banjo123: Thank you Rhonda

>28 FAMeulstee: Thanks Anita.

32drneutron
Mar 21, 9:00pm Top

Happy new thread!

33PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 9:14pm Top

>32 drneutron: Thanks Jim.

34BLBera
Mar 21, 9:50pm Top

Happy new thread, Paul. I hope you and yours are safe. Take care.

35PaulCranswick
Mar 21, 11:46pm Top

>34 BLBera: Thank you, Beth. Belle is abed. Erni is busy making spicy sardines for our lunch. Yasmyne is in the Northernmost outposts of Europe in Olesund and the other two are planning to navigate (or not by staying put) potential lock-down in Sheffield.

Yours truly is posting, listening to music and managing to assuage his reading mojo.

36PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 22, 3:13am Top

Book # 34



The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli

Date of Publication : 2013
Pages : 183 pp
Origin of Author : Mexico

A Mexican man of humble origins becomes an auctioneer and proceeds to make a living auctioning the teeth of the famous.

It should be an absolute train-wreck but it is immediate and fabulous. Absurd, comical and tragic, there are elements of Italo Calvino at his best here and it is a short novel that I would heartily recommend.

37PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 22, 3:20am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 1/12
6. Plays - 2/12 -
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 1/12 -
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 2/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 7 Year to Date - 34
Pages Read March - 1,656 Year to Date - 7,530
1001 Books March - 0 Year to Date - 3
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 75.27 Year to Date - 91.83

Gender of Authors 8 Female / 26 male

38Deern
Mar 22, 1:22am Top

Oops, another thread? Happy New Thread Paul and Happy Sunday to you and all your family members, may you all be safe.

New restrictions in Italy, more companies have to close, no more sports outside in Lombardy. shouldn’t touch me as my company is system relevant and at least for the next two weeks (substituting a colleague in maternity leave) my work is as a basis for production planning and purchasing management. After that, if the colleague returns, I don’t know. The last thing required right now is project management, so I might be sent into holiday, or reduced hours.

39humouress
Mar 22, 2:00am Top

Happy new thread Paul!

>18 PaulCranswick: In that case, that could be my older son.

40PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 2:32am Top

>38 Deern: I really think that Malaysia have grasped the nettle properly (other than let the Malays slip back to their villages on the eve of lockdown) by insisting upon the closure of all but essential services for the two weeks to 31 March.

I think the tide will turn soon for the better. At least I pray it shall, Nathalie. xx

>39 humouress: Thanks Nina. I think boys of a certain age crave girls whilst boys of a slightly different age crave gril(l)s.

41Familyhistorian
Mar 22, 2:32am Top

Happy new thread, Paul. From the post about your government's restrictions they are a lot stricter than our government but things keep tightening up here as the cases increase.

42PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 22, 2:35am Top

>41 Familyhistorian: I am not a fan of the Malaysian government but credit where it is due in taking a difficult decision quickly and decisively. I am less pleased to hear that a government linked medical agency has just made a deal to take a virtual monopoly on the distribution of face masks and that they have increased in price from RM0.80 to RM2.00 per piece. Some immoral bastard is about to make a few million.

43PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 22, 12:44pm Top

Book # 35



Ivanov by Anton Checkhov

Date of Publication : 1887
Pages : 58 pp
Origin of Author : Russia

My first encounter with Checkhov (how did I get to 53 and never experience one of his plays?) and since I bought a job lot of his plays, it won't be my last.

Possibly the first of his successful serious plays, it tells the story of Nikolai Ivanov who marries a jewess for her money - has her change her religion and she gets disowned by her family getting no dowry. Whilst he realises his mistake and is torn by conscience she loves him madly though dying of consumption.

This is also the first book I can probably say I listened to the audio version of as I found a recording of it on YouTube with Vivien Leigh and John Gielgud in the lead roles. Excellent and enabled my understanding of the whole thing tremendously. Interesting that Vivien Leigh was dying of TB as she was playing Anya.

Some marvellous supporting characters made this a great experience.

44PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 22, 12:51pm Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 1/12
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 1/12 -
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 2/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 8 Year to Date - 35
Pages Read March - 1,714 Year to Date - 7,588
1001 Books March - 0 Year to Date - 3
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 77.91 Year to Date - 92.54

Gender of Authors 8 Female / 27 male

45PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 3:25am Top

I have so far managed to finish 5 books this weekend and at least this lockdown is going to improve my reading stats!

46alcottacre
Mar 22, 6:00am Top

Checking in on the new thread, Paul. I saw on your previous thread that you had finished Witness: Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom. I am glad that you enjoyed it.

>45 PaulCranswick: Congratulations! You are doing better on the Readathon than I am :)

47PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 6:11am Top

>46 alcottacre: I really enjoyed parts of it and have held Wiesel in awe for many, many years.

Doing better than you? - it is not very often that that can be said!

48PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 6:25am Top

Wanted to share this story someone told me:

In Washington DC, one guy is queuing for Coronavirus testing. After standing in line for 8 hours his patience is at an end. He turns to the fellow behind him and asks him to save his place, shows him his revolver and tells him he's gonna go and shoot Trump.

After an hour he is back in line. "Did ya shoot him?" the fellow asked him
"Nah", he replied. "the queue was even longer over there!"

49charl08
Mar 22, 6:55am Top

Happy "new" thread, Paul. I am enjoying seeing how everyone is reading this weekend over at the readathon thread. No one has told the birds in my garden to self-isolate and they are very busy eating sunflower hearts in the (cold) sunshine. Hope your uptick in reading continues.

50Caroline_McElwee
Mar 22, 7:01am Top

>43 PaulCranswick: Good heavens Paul, how did you manage that? Still, what a bag of treats you have ahead.

51PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 7:20am Top

>49 charl08: That is a lovely perspective, Charlotte. I do hope to get to the UK soon and it is but a short drive to the North West. We could hit a bookstore somewhere quite seriously if they ever deign to open.

>50 Caroline_McElwee: Well it is relative, Caroline. I have read but 35 books this year whilst Suz and Lori and Susan and Amanda etc close in on 100!

I am pleased though with my progress so far.

52msf59
Mar 22, 7:42am Top

Happy New Thread, Paul. I like the poem excerpt in #2. I hope you had a nice weekend. Crazy times continue here in the states. This is going to have massive repercussions. I just wish we didn't have "you know who" in charge.

53karenmarie
Mar 22, 8:12am Top

Hi Paul, and happy new thread.

>35 PaulCranswick: Thanks for the family update. Sad for the reason, but glad you’re assuaging your reading mojo.

54PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 9:31am Top

>52 msf59: It will make or break his Presidency, Mark and thankfully, in a sad way, the signs are it will break it.

>53 karenmarie: I am happy to be reading and the novelty of our incarceration is still there so Belle and I are sort of enjoying it still.

55jessibud2
Mar 22, 10:40am Top

>48 PaulCranswick: - LOL. Pity... I also think it was a waste of 2 perfectly good (and much needed) tests kits, having Pence and his wife tested. Not surprising, though...

56alcottacre
Mar 22, 10:46am Top

>47 PaulCranswick: Husband breaks, don't you know? That and the fact that CFS just will not leave me alone.

>48 PaulCranswick: LOL

57SirThomas
Mar 22, 11:51am Top

Happy new thread, Paul and the best wishes.
Stay well

58PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 12:41pm Top

>55 jessibud2: Would be funny I suppose if it wasn't so tragic!

>56 alcottacre: Hahaha; another advantage of my choice of kids to care for being so blasted anti-social!

59PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 12:41pm Top

>59 PaulCranswick: Thank you, Thomas. I am doing ok so far.

60PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 23, 7:57am Top

Book # 36



Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson

Date of Publication : 2010
Pages : 252 pp
Origin of Author : Iceland

Rookie gets his first police posting in the frozen North leaving his girlfriend behind.

Struggles to settle into an unwelcoming environment where the community is not all it seems to be.

I thoroughly enjoyed this new-to-me Scandi series and the pages skipped along nicely. Very good plot, setting and believable characters. Well set up for the next in the series and I will look for it as soon as the bookstores open.

Recommended

61PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 23, 8:14am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 1/12
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 2/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 9 Year to Date - 36
Pages Read March - 1,966 Year to Date - 7,840
1001 Books March - 0 Year to Date - 3
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 89.36 Year to Date - 95.61

Gender of Authors 8 Female / 28 male

62m.belljackson
Mar 22, 1:14pm Top

Hi Paul - "You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din" time.

Followup on tracking where Prescription Drugs or their ingredients are sourced:

1. CDER (Center for Drug Evaluation and Research) DRUG INFO from FDA Center states "Current labeling regulation does NOT require the disclosure of the manufacturer
OR country of origin for drug products.

The manufacturing information is sometimes listed in the labeling posted in FDA's label repository.

2. A search for the repository (geez) yielded a boggling display of choices.

I twice entered Naratriptan (migraine med) under "Human RX" and got nowhere except directed to a bunch of inscrutable abbreviations.

3. Sure hope someone with more scientific expertise can trace down where the world's drugs originate.

4. Otherwise, we have only the bat soup wildlife market in Wuhan...

63richardderus
Mar 22, 1:14pm Top

>60 PaulCranswick: Et tu, Cranswickae? Ari Thòr has followed me around like a methane release!

On the plus side, you are powerin' through the reads so building a comfy cushion against the complete bonkersness post-plague.

64PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 1:16pm Top

>62 m.belljackson: That is scary to think that there is little traceability on something so important. What is to stop us being fed palliatives instead of real drugs?

65PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 1:18pm Top

>63 richardderus: I am not sure whether methane releases are particularly bad - I suppose close to your room mate with a lit cheroot in his kisser then it would have its attractions.

66Berly
Mar 22, 2:22pm Top



for a new thread!!

>1 PaulCranswick: A very handsome, if brooding, boy. ; )

>36 PaulCranswick: Love the improbable sound of this one!!

Wishing you health and happiness in your togetherness.

67johnsimpson
Mar 22, 6:03pm Top

Happy new thread mate.

68PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 9:25pm Top

>66 Berly: Certainly Luiselli's book won't be to everyone's taste but it was quirky, readable and fun.

>67 johnsimpson: Thanks John.

69brenzi
Mar 22, 9:57pm Top

>48 PaulCranswick: I'm not surprised. Lol. You're reading up a storm Paul but I've managed to let my reading slow to a crawl because of lack of concentration.

70PaulCranswick
Mar 22, 10:02pm Top

>69 brenzi: I had a few days of adjustment issues but then my reading is prospering in the lockdown as it should!

71PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 27, 6:35am Top

Book # 37



Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Date of Publication : 1811
Pages : 374 pp
Origin of Author : UK
British Author Challenge
1001 Books First Edition

I'm not going to trash an Austen novel. How could I?

Sense and Sensibility her first published novel. Sense is Elinor and Sensibility is Marianne - 2 of the 3 Dashwood sisters but they won't always perform to type.

Austen was still developing her narrative style but she was already good at characterisation and dialogue and her timeless ability to turn a phrase will always elevate her above the ordinary. Let's face facts though; the two sisters were annoying.

Their concerns a good marriage transacted properly and honourably were of the Regency but not concerns that particularly raise my own heckles when I am reading fiction. It is all neatly done and the two girls get the least worthless men on offer in the tale - eventually.

Napoleon was rampaging across Europe, Trafalgar and Waterloo were on the horizon but the Dashwood girls were keen to a-bed with Willoughby Brandon and Ferrers. Why weren't they off helping good old Arthur Wellesley win the Battle of Salamanca in 1812?

72PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 27, 6:41am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 2/12 Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 1/12
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 2/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 10 Year to Date - 37
Pages Read March - 2,340 Year to Date - 8,214
1001 Books March - 1 Year to Date - 4
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 101.74 Year to Date - 98.96

Gender of Authors 9 Female / 28 male

73EllaTim
Mar 23, 8:37am Top

Happy reading, Paul!

I am mostly reading the news and twitter right now. Gotta stop it.

74PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 8:45am Top

>73 EllaTim: In three full days I have read seven books, Ella. So I do know now how Suz and Anita do it but I am sure I couldn't keep it up so long. Anita told me she can average up to 90 pages an hour whereas I cannot really beat 50.

75PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 8:54am Top

I won't be triumphalist but neither will I waste too much of my pity.

Harvey Weinstein has coronavirus.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52000173

76PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 9:18am Top

Today is my 24th wedding anniversary and SWMBO is two continents away. WhatsApp is great but it is no replacement! x

77PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 23, 9:19am Top

I'm missing this sort of scene at the moment confined to barracks as we are

78PawsforThought
Mar 23, 10:05am Top

79PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 10:31am Top

>78 PawsforThought: Quite probably, Paws. If one of those ladies were my daughter or sister I been doing cartwheels at the moment.

80jessibud2
Mar 23, 11:33am Top

Happy anniversary Paul. Next year's will be better!

>77 PaulCranswick: - Beautiful and certainly exemplary of the current mood...

81m.belljackson
Mar 23, 11:43am Top

>75 PaulCranswick:

And Rand Paul?

Some of us religious/spiritual/deist/humanitarians are mildly shocked at our reaction
to the tyrant Republicans getting this virus -

it runs along the lines of -

"Well, if THAT's the only way we can get rid of them!"

82richardderus
Mar 23, 12:31pm Top

>75 PaulCranswick: Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

83PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 8:07pm Top

>80 jessibud2: It actually wasn't too bad, but I always want next year to be a better one.

>81 m.belljackson: I hadn't heard about Rand Paul getting the virus. Don't share his politics but I do hope he makes a full recovery.

84PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 8:09pm Top

>82 richardderus: Yep here's one that I am not too bothered about recovering. Fancy having to stand up in court and attest that you had been forced to have sex with such an ugly man.

85AnneDC
Mar 23, 10:38pm Top

Hi Paul--briefly dropping by to assure you that I have not actually disappeared. I hope a silver lining of being mostly confined to my home is more time to spent visiting on LT. We shall see.

86PaulCranswick
Mar 23, 10:50pm Top

>85 AnneDC: I am always happy to see you around the threads, Anne, but would prefer the situation to be different - confinement is not too enthralling!

87Berly
Mar 24, 1:21am Top

>76 PaulCranswick: Happy (long-distance) wedding anniversary!!

88quondame
Mar 24, 1:29am Top

I'm sorry you and Hani can't be together for your anniversary. I suspect we'll have to order in for ours next month.

89PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 1:50am Top

>87 Berly: Hahaha thank, Kimmers.

>88 quondame: We are not even sure when we will be able to meet again, Susan. The UK goes into lockdown finally today and our own lockdown looks certain to get another 2 weeks by the end of this week.
I can't fly as they wouldn't let Belle leave without compromising her Malaysian passport.
SWMBO's car hire company called and said that they were closing for three weeks and will take 3 weeks payment tomorrow or she must return the car - charming.

90PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 24, 3:06am Top

Taken from Peggy's thread:

1. Who(m) are you named after? Probably a nursery rhyme; I have a twin - Peter
2. Last time you cried? Few days ago by telephone with SWMBO
3. Do you like your handwriting? As much as I like spiders - they look alike
4. What is your favorite lunch meat? I like pheasant but haven't had it in years
5. Longest relationship? Married 24 years
6. Do you still have your tonsils? No
7. Would you bungee jump? No way; I'm too heavy
8. What is your favorite kind of cereal? Oatmeal; made with hot milk and honey
9. Do you untie your shoes when you take them off? No I have slip-ons
10. Do you think you're strong willed? Would say I am pragmatic
11. Favorite ice cream? Coffee with whisky
12. What is the first thing you notice about a person? Their eyes. I always try to look someone in the eye
13. Football or baseball? Football - meaning soccer of course
14. What color pants are you wearing? Im in blue jeans today
15. Last thing you ate? Curried chicken breast served with couscous
16. What are you listening to? My Spotify playlists 1978 at the moment
17. If you were a crayon, what color would you be? Probably white because it doesn't get used too much!
18. What is your favorite smell? Fresh baked bread
19. Who was the last person you talked to on the phone? The Project Director of PNB118
20. Married? Erm........I reckon so
21. Hair color? Dark brown and grey/white
22. Eye color? Dark brown
23. Favorite food? Tough one....chicken liver pate on good french bread
24. Scary movies or happy endings? Definitely happy endings
25. Last movie you watched In a theater? Oh....The Joker, possibly
26. What color shirt are you wearing? Blue grey check
27. Favorite holiday? Absolutely Christmas
28. Beer or Wine? Can I say both! ....a good beer, I guess
29. Night owl or morning person? Night Owl
30. Favorite day of the week? Saturday, because my weekend starts
31. Favorite animal? Spaniels
32. Do you have a pet? Presently two cats
33. Where would you like travel to? To the 170 or so countries I have yet to visit. And to as many LT meet-ups as I can make it to.

91FAMeulstee
Mar 24, 5:39am Top

Must be hard to be apart and not knowing when you will be reunited again, Paul.

Over here all gatherings until June were cancelled. I think the Olympics will be postponed as well.

92PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 6:44am Top

>91 FAMeulstee: It will be three weeks at least Anita. :(

We will almost certainly see the cancellation of the Giro D'Italia and the Tour de France which I always look forward to so much. Europe is slowly taking it seriously and I reckon we will see it under control by May. Hopefully not wishful thinking.

93PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 24, 6:54am Top

Currently Reading :

The Holy Fox : The Life of Lord Halifax by Andrew Roberts

For those who don't know he was the British Foreign Minister immediately prior to WW2, identified with Appeasement and didn't take the Prime Minister's job when he could have standing aside for Churchill. Very interesting re-assessment of his life and career.

The Interrogation by JMG Le Clezio

The first novel of the French author winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize


94karenmarie
Mar 24, 7:31am Top

Hi Paul!

Happy anniversary but sorry that Hani and you weren't together to celebrate it.

>71 PaulCranswick: Austen never brought the outside world into her novels. I'm sorry and a bit surprised, I guess, that it didn't really appeal to you.

>90 PaulCranswick: I saw this on Peggy's thread and filled it out immediately but didn't post it so will go back to my thread and post.

95PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 7:52am Top

>94 karenmarie: I didn't hate Sense and Sensibility, Karen, but I did prefer both Mansfield Park and Northanger Abbey, because, I think, it smacks very much of a first novel and the two sisters were just occasionally caricatures.

Look forward to seeing what you have on Peggy's MEME.

96PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 8:17am Top

>94 karenmarie: Bearing in mind what Karen had said about my lukewarm reaction to Sense and Sensibility, I went online and found numerous rankings of Austen's novels. I saw a dozen from magazines, forums and scholars and not a one put her first published novel first. I feel a little justified placing it below Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park amongst her novels. I really should go and read those again though as it is 30 years since I read them.

97PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 10:56am Top

Valeria Luiselli whose book Story of My Teeth I read at the weekend and enjoyed has just won The Rathbones Folio Prize for Lost Children Archive

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/mar/23/valeria-luiselli-wins-rathbones-fo...

Some success then for Latin American writers and if the earlier novel is to go by then most likely well deserved.

She is also very sweet looking:

98jnwelch
Mar 24, 1:46pm Top

A belated Happy New Thread, Paul.

I'm glad you got to Sense and Sensibility. I found Emma, the character, more annoying than Elinor and Marianne; in fact, Elinor had some appeal to me, as I think of her as Emma Thomson from the well done movie. Marianne thrashing around in poetic rapture or despair is annoying, but at least she comes around eventually to some Sense.

Longbourn, the one about below stairs P & P, does bring in the war in an interesting way.

Wow, I sure wouldn't put S & S below Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park. Those are my bottom two, in that order. P & P and Persuasion are my top two. But Austen readers are all over the place, as you saw.

99PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 2:01pm Top

>98 jnwelch: I will read Longbourn soon, Joe. I am checking stats on various sources to compile a ranking of Jane Austen novels.

100Berly
Mar 24, 2:38pm Top

>89 PaulCranswick: It's not like they are going to come looking for her car. ; )

>90 PaulCranswick: Like your playlist and where you want to travel -- LT meet ups!!!

101AMQS
Edited: Mar 24, 3:19pm Top

I find that Sense and Sensibility improves with each reading/listening. Marianne used to drive me crazy and sometimes still does but maybe because my daughters are nearer to her age now I can recognize the indignations and absolutes of the young and idealistic. Emma has always been my favorite. She is really insufferable, but grows up a lot. I decided that my next audiobook would be a comfort read and settled on Persuasion only to find that the version I love (Rosalyn Landor) is not on offer digitally at my library anymore. (eta) I supposed it hardly matters anymore as I am not driving anywhere, and that's where I do most of my listening.

102PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 3:48pm Top

>100 Berly: I loved putting my playlists together for the 1970s - 1000 songs in all. I did 80 per year and then a further 200 on one playlist that didn't make the 80 in each year because I chose only 1 song per artist.

>101 AMQS: I checked or did a sweep of 20 places on line which ranked Austen's main 6 books. I gave each points 6 for 1st and 1 point for 6th and then totalled them up and here are the results. I won't list all the sites and blogs but here were the results compiled:

1 Pride and Prejudice 98 points
2 Persuasion 79 points
3 Emma 76 points
4 Northanger Abbey 61 points
5 Sense and Sensibility 54 points
6 Mansfield Park 53 points

Not at all scientific but interesting nonetheless.
Pride & Prejudice was top on 8 lists
Persuasion on 5 lists
Emma on 3 lists
Northanger Abbey on 2 lists
Mansfield Park on 2 lists

No list put Sense and Sensibility top.

103alcottacre
Mar 24, 4:08pm Top

>60 PaulCranswick: That one is already in the BlackHole or I would be adding it again

>76 PaulCranswick: I am sorry you and Hanni did not get to spend your anniversary together, Paul!

104quondame
Mar 24, 4:18pm Top

>95 PaulCranswick: >98 jnwelch: I never found Elinor annoying and found Marianne young and caught up in the beginnings of what became the Romantic sensibility of later 19th century. It was a sort of very early conflict of cultures. I rate Mansfield Park above it, but it took me until I was much older to appreciate how Fanny Price who is so much the actual embodiment of so many period virtues and is so under valued by most around her as well as most readers who prefer sprightly heroines to steadfast ones. Catherine in Northanger Abbey I found more annoying than either Elinor or Marianne. I think I prefer Persuasion to Sense and Sensibility most times I re-read them. It's now been quite a while, over 10 years, since I've read any of them, but with 5-10 re-reads, I don't forget much. And would still place all of them above almost any other books.

105avatiakh
Mar 24, 4:28pm Top

I remember when I was visiting Gibralter reading about the military officer who regretted not having any reading matter during the 1779-1783 siege so set up a library at a later date.

106AMQS
Mar 24, 5:13pm Top

>102 PaulCranswick: No, and Sense and Sensibility would not be at the top of my list either. I just have more tolerance for Marianne than I did at first read:). My list would look something like this:
1. Emma
2. Pride and Prejudice and Persuasion (tie)
4. Sense and Sensibility
5. Northanger Abbey
6. Mansfield Park

107FAMeulstee
Mar 24, 6:37pm Top

>90 PaulCranswick: Like your answers, Paul, especially your favorite lunch meat ;-)
Of course football is soccer!

108PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 9:02pm Top

>103 alcottacre: Decent Scandi effort, Stasia.

>104 quondame: That is the absolute beauty of books and opinion, Susan. I might have read S&S another time and taken a completely different view of the main characters. I definitely thought that Mansfield Park was the more textured and complete novel.

109PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 9:06pm Top

>105 avatiakh: With my 4,000 books at home, I have very little cause for complaint, Kerry, Great story though about the siege of Gibraltar which is a place I lived and worked in for 12 weeks many years ago.

>106 AMQS: There is something there, Anne. I think if you rate Mansfield Park higher normally Northanger Abbey would be bumped up too. Isn't it wonderful that she wrote 6 such wonderful novels (and a few more) and virtually nobody can agree on which is the best one?

110PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 9:07pm Top

>107 FAMeulstee: Anita, I think our American friends would take issue with us but football and soccer are definitely one and the same!

111LizzieD
Mar 24, 11:07pm Top

I'm too late to post my Austen love, but *P&P* and *Persuasion* top my list.
>90 PaulCranswick: Love reading your answers! You remind me that the best ice cream I ever had was a coffee with B&B that DH and I made years and years ago and never repeated after that particular bottle was emptied.

112PaulCranswick
Mar 24, 11:56pm Top

>111 LizzieD: Thanks so much for putting that MEME up on your thread, Peggy. It is great to think about those things and then the first answer that suggests is invariably right!

You picked the first two in my unscientific ranking, Peggy.

Haagen Dazs used to do a Bailey's Ice Cream that I could eat forever.

113PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 7:37am Top

As people know, I am not a huge Royalist but I am saddened to see that Prince Charles has tested positive for coronavirus.

114karenmarie
Edited: Mar 25, 9:20pm Top

>90 PaulCranswick: Interesting reason for not bungee jumping – mine’s more along the lines of total and abject fear. I guess I didn’t know that you have two cats…

>101 AMQS: I am not driving anywhere, and that's where I do most of my listening. My situation, too, Anne – mine started when I retired 4 years ago, but has escalated and at this point even if Bill and I go out to the dump and grocery shopping once a week it will be in his car not mine and we don’t listen to anything when we’re in his car. I finally brought Lethal White in yesterday to finish it – took from 1/20 to 3/24.

>102 PaulCranswick: Interesting rankings, Paul. Since I’m doing a Jane Austen Novel re-read this year but plan on taking the whole year to do it, I’ll figure out my own ratings in 2021!

>113 PaulCranswick: Eeek. I hadn’t seen that… I’m not a fan of Charles although have softened in light of having watched some documentaries and The Crown, but that saddens me particularly as it must have a lot to do with his public role.

115m.belljackson
Mar 25, 12:24pm Top

Statistics can be fun and great resources, yet often the same results have been used to promote contradictory opinions.

It's hard to compare the results of the Flu and other pandemics with what is going on now
because
few of the previous ones reacted so swiftly (except for the UK & USA tyrant dictators) to isolate, test, or self-isolate.

116benitastrnad
Edited: Mar 25, 1:27pm Top

>114 karenmarie:
Interesting that his wife hasn't tested positive. At least according to CNN.

117PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 2:09pm Top

>114 karenmarie: Apparently they do a calculation based on your weight to measure your likely fall with the bungee jump. The rope could snap with my weight too.

The cats suffer me rather me suffering them, Karen.

Look forward to seeing your own rankings, Karen.

To be fair the Royals are aloof even with each other!

>115 m.belljackson: Stats are used usually by me for fun but also occasionally to make a serious point. The health figures are misleading because the actual testing is not that widespread.

118PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 2:10pm Top

>116 benitastrnad: Yes Benita I wouldn't be keen in getting close enough to infect her.

119benitastrnad
Mar 25, 2:15pm Top

I think it shows that this virus doesn't get everybody and doesn't do it at the same rate. The totals for confirmed cases in Tuscaloosa remain low. As of this morning 10 out of a population of 170,000. Now it is a wait and see game.

120m.belljackson
Edited: Mar 25, 4:44pm Top

>117 PaulCranswick:

Yep and i hope the delusional virus deniers read The New York Times essay by the New York City Times Editor who is caring
for her diagnosed husband at home: "What I Learned When My Husband Got Sick."

Wait till this virus hits trump's full force supporters in the down south states.
Very sad.
No statistics for human stupidity, I'm guessing.

Oh, wait, I forgot - "Frankly (they) don't give a damn!"

121Caroline_McElwee
Mar 25, 5:14pm Top

How is your mum doing Paul?

122alcottacre
Mar 25, 5:19pm Top

>113 PaulCranswick: I had not heard that yet.

Hope everything is still well with you and yours, Paul!

123PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 8:01pm Top

>119 benitastrnad: Urban areas and more densely populated ones are obviously going to be impacted most - the rate of infection will obviously be affected by the rate of interaction.

>120 m.belljackson: Are there really virus deniers, Marianne?!
I don't wish the virus on anyone but as you said the stats don't measure stupidity.

124PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 8:03pm Top

>121 Caroline_McElwee: She is more than a little scared, Caroline. SWMBO will go and see her often and take her some groceries etc as she obviously cannot do that herself.

>122 alcottacre: So far we are doing better than the Royal family, Stasia and I don't get to say that often.

125brenzi
Mar 25, 8:43pm Top

New Orleans is being hammered right now Paul and also Birmingham, Alabama has run out of ICU rooms so the virus is on the move. NO they're blaming on Madrid Gras. And who knows how far and wide the college students who were celebrating Spring Break ten days ago spread the virus. I listen to what Gov. Cuomo has to say and feel fully informed. If only he, or someone like him, were president.

126PaulCranswick
Mar 25, 11:02pm Top

>125 brenzi: I was thinking the self same thing, Bonnie, he should step into the race and catapult himself into the White House. Where the hell are Biden and Sanders at the moment anyway?

Cuomo is much less progressive than others I would have liked but he has shown the true colour of leadership and he would beat Trump. I am not sure about Biden. I don't think Chump can be blamed for spreading the virus which is what some are trying to say but he can be blamed for some of the misinformation he has daily given out. It is a dangerous business for the opposition to criticise the President in a time of national / global crisis but Cuomo is able to walk the talk and is in a position to take advantage of it.

127jessibud2
Mar 26, 8:44am Top

>125 brenzi:, >126 PaulCranswick: - I am not American but we can't help but watch in horror as this president dives deeper and deeper into his delusions. I agree that Andrew Cuomo has shown the kind of leadership than we last saw in the USA in Barack Obama. t-Rump wants to believe that if he wills it to be over by Easter (barely a couple of weeks away), it will be. And yet his *numbers* are said to be higher than ever. This is insanity. If so many people believe and support him, thousands (or more) WILL die. t-Rump willfully ignores medical experts and scientists. If he continues on his path of ignorance, isn't that/won't that be a crime against humanity? This man is almost more dangerous than the virus itself. He is a virus. Toxic. Shudder...

128BekkaJo
Mar 26, 9:07am Top

Just popping in to check you are okay. Hubby has the computer for work most of the day, my work laptop is screwey (I'm therefore working 6-8 then 6-8 again in the evening and home-school in the interim), so I'm a little sporadic on here.

Looks like the reading is going well for you at least :)

129PaulCranswick
Mar 26, 9:20am Top

>127 jessibud2: Strong leadership in a crisis is not the be all and end all, Shelley - just look at Rudy Giuliani as proof of that, but Cuomo has impressed me. I have never been as moved by an American President's words as I was by Obama's inauguration speeches but ultimately his administration was a slight anti-climax - hampered by an unfriendly legislature. It is retrospect that his star shines so brightly and for 2 reasons:

1 His humanity and personal qualities were stronger than that of his administration; and
2 Chump is such an ass-wipe in comparison.

The situation in the USA is a bit scary just as it is in the rest of the world - Chump can pretend and bluster all he likes but the figures there are not getting better.

130PaulCranswick
Mar 26, 9:23am Top

>128 BekkaJo: I'm fine, Bekka, other than for the recent habit I seem to have developed for muddling up names.

Samsung CT have issued a circular to team leaders (which apparently includes me) authorising a process of taking the company computers home for a stretch to allow working from home. I am exempt because of my laptop, but it seems that they recognise that this problem may not be solved in a matter of days.

131m.belljackson
Mar 26, 10:43am Top

>126 PaulCranswick:

Nearly ALL Sane Americans ARE blaming the tyrant for the explosion of the virus because of his REFUSAL to ACT

TWO MONTHS ago when it would have made a difference!

Most of trump's followers ARE virus deniers - and most live in The South - and some have plans to spread the virus once they get it.

His ignorance killed people at his Mexican Wall and now has exposed all of us to death from virus.

132PaulCranswick
Mar 26, 11:07am Top

>131 m.belljackson: I think the numbers in the States over the last couple of days does bear out that if the country had gone into lockdown sooner the spread may have been less.
His approval rating has somehow gone up during this crisis which is baffling but I would hesitate to call all those that approve of his handling of the issue as insane - just wrong.

The world will realise that the lockdown is going to cause the mother of all economic crises and we will need to face that one down because it will cause more misery for longer than this virus.

Chump's followers in the South plan to spread the virus, Marianne? I cannot abide the guy and I wish his supporters would open their eyes but isn't that a bit of a stretch?

133Deern
Mar 26, 11:26am Top

Hi Paul! :)
Am having a busy week, now trying to catch up. Will do that meme, just copied it into pages.

It‘s been ages since I read some Austen, but S&S grew on me from read to read, must be my second favorite by now. On my first read I was so annoyed with Marianne that I thought I couldn’t finish it.

134DeltaQueen50
Mar 26, 12:07pm Top

Hi Paul, just checking in on you to make sure you and your family are all safe and healthy. We are doing fine although this virus is certainly taking a toll and changing our lives. Although both my husband and I are at the age to be at risk, I am mostly worried about my 98 year old Mum. My Austen favorites have always been Pride and Prejudice and Persuasion. I actually would put Emma at the bottom of my list. Take care of yourself!

135PaulCranswick
Mar 26, 12:41pm Top

>133 Deern: That may be the solution with S&S to read it more than once in order to better appreciate its qualities.
Look forward to seeing your MEME answers.

>134 DeltaQueen50: Always pleased to see you are doing OK, my dear Guru. Your mum at 98 is most obviously a cause for concern in these times.

You listed the three main Austen books I have still to read.

136Familyhistorian
Edited: Mar 26, 5:42pm Top

Looks like you are doing well with the reads, Paul. You got me with a BB for Holy Fox, Halifax has been a common figure in many of the books that I have read about Britain and WWII so I'd like to know more about him. My library has the book and it will be nice when they are actually open again. I won't weigh in on the Austin discussion as I have only read one of her books, Pride and Prejudice which I read at the same time as Longbourn, which enhanced both books.

137m.belljackson
Mar 26, 3:28pm Top

>132 PaulCranswick:

Alas. 1. The FBI is monitoring the increasing number of white supremacists who have declared (sparing you their gruesome details)
that they will spread the virus once they get it.
2. The Florida and other party-goers who have promised to bring the virus home if they get it.
3. The totally bonkers attention seekers who are photographed licking toilet seats.
4. The refusal of most Southern trumpettes to believe that the virus is real...how sane is it to deny FACTS?

Just a sampling of the Virus Zombie Reality Show...

138PaulCranswick
Mar 26, 7:53pm Top

>136 Familyhistorian: I am enjoying the book, Meg and Roberts does a fairly good job of judging him reasonably. I have always found him an interesting presence especially considering we came so close to having him as Prime Minister instead of Churchill. How it would have changed the world is difficult to conceive.

>137 m.belljackson: That is truly disturbing, Marianne.
Why in 2020 is there still such a thing as a white supremacist? Rank, rank stupidity.

140PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 28, 8:00am Top

Book # 38



The English Civil War by David Clark

Date of Publication : 2008
Pages : 154 pp
Origin of Author : UK

David Clark taught history in schools and universities for over 30 years (the dust jacket told me) and his school masterly style is obvious here. The narrative drive of the history - with which I was already quite familiar - progressed at a pleasing clip and was easily understandable.

All the main engagements were there: Edgehill, Newbury, Marston Moor and Naseby as was an insightful consideration of the strengths and weaknesses of the various characters involved.

It is part of the Pocket Essentials series and is a good introduction and overview to this molten period of my country's history.

141PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 28, 8:06am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 2/12 Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 2/12 - The English Civil War by David Clark
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 2/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 11 Year to Date - 38
Pages Read March - 2,494 Year to Date - 8,368
1001 Books March - 1 Year to Date - 4
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 92.37 Year to Date - 96.18

Gender of Authors 9 Female / 29 male

142humouress
Mar 27, 7:09am Top

Just whizzing through. I think Persuasion is my favourite Austen. P&P is definitely up there somewhere too, but it was my first and we studied it at school so it’s hard to be objective about where it goes; it could even be at the top. Mansfield Park is probably my least favourite because, although I appreciate Fanny Price’s qualities, I could see the romances going in a different direction.

>131 m.belljackson: I suspect the Mexicans will be building that wall as high and as fast as they can ;0)

143PaulCranswick
Mar 27, 7:36am Top

>142 humouress: Good to see you neighbour!

If I had the resources, I would send some bricks for the Mexicans to wall themselves away from Chump's America. A second term would be a real nightmare scenario for the world at large.

144jessibud2
Mar 27, 8:34am Top

Hi Paul. I just heard on the news that Boris has tested positive. Now, can someone please cough and sneeze on t-Rump?.....

145PaulCranswick
Mar 27, 8:46am Top

>144 jessibud2: Yes, I saw the news Shelley. I do hope he makes a full recovery; his likely replacement is MUCH worse.

146PaulCranswick
Mar 27, 8:37pm Top

Well the Coronavirus figures daily get worse. There were more cases in the US yesterday than the UK has had in total although the US death rates compared to Italy is not quite as alarming.

I am going to try to forget all that and concentrate on reading this weekend although the new series of Ozark is coming out tomorrow on Netflix here which I am looking forward to. I also need to go and buy some more groceries as we expect the restrictions to tighten further this next week here.

147vancouverdeb
Mar 27, 8:43pm Top

We have restrictions on our groceries too , Paul. Good luck with your shopping. I'm sure we will be fine. Knock on wood, I understand our covid 19 cases are slowing.

148brenzi
Edited: Mar 27, 8:57pm Top

Omg the opening scene in the new season of Ozark. I just watched it Paul. Good lord.

149PaulCranswick
Mar 27, 10:53pm Top

>147 vancouverdeb: Malaysia's are well controlled but the case increases in USA, Italy, Spain and UK are a major cause for concern.

>148 brenzi: Don't tell me, Bonnie! I can hardly wait for this series as I thought that the first two were probably the best TV I have seen in aeons.

150msf59
Mar 28, 6:39am Top

Happy Weekend, Paul. I hope you and the family are staying safe. Good luck with those varied books reads. I just started The Splendid and the Vile. Another interesting look at Churchill. This time during the Blitz.

151PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 7:58am Top

>150 msf59: Thanks Mark. He features in one of the books I am reading this weekend too - The Holy Fox which is a biography of Lord Halifax the man who could have been Prime Minister when Churchill got the call in 1940.

152PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 31, 9:15am Top

Book # 39



The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

Date of Publication : 1996
Pages : 280 pp
Origin of Author : USA

Very readable fantasy about thievery and three kingdoms.

If I tell too much it would spoil the plot but I am pleased to say that this has plenty of interesting twists and turns and a satisfying end.

153PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 31, 9:20am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 0/12
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 2/12 Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 2/12 - The English Civil War by David Clark
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 3/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy; The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 12 Year to Date - 39
Pages Read March - 2,774 Year to Date - 8,648
1001 Books March - 1 Year to Date - 4
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 99.07 Year to Date - 98.27

Gender of Authors 10 Female / 29 male

154scaifea
Mar 28, 9:37am Top

>152 PaulCranswick: *does happy dance*

I love love LOVE this series, and the subsequent books get even better!

155PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 10:29am Top

>154 scaifea: I don't know how it is classified as YA fiction to be honest, Amber. In any case I couldn't care less because I liked it too!

156richardderus
Mar 28, 11:18am Top

Happy pandemic, Paul!

157jnwelch
Mar 28, 3:15pm Top

Hope you're having a good weekend, Paul, despite the virus circumstances.

158AMQS
Mar 28, 6:49pm Top

>152 PaulCranswick: Ooh, I read The Thief last year on Amber's recommendation. Listened, actually. I would like to read more. I received The Librarian for Christmas but it hasn't called my name yet. I look forward to your comments, Paul.

>114 karenmarie: Karen, I'm impressed that you kept going! I have pockets of time when I can listen when I'm at home, but I find I am used to the every day driving listening, and what I want at home just now s a comfort listen that will distract me but something that I don't have to pay too close attention to. I had decided on Persuasion but the digital version I liked at the library is not available anymore. I finally reached out to the library to ask about it and they've ordered it for me! I love libraries.

159avatiakh
Mar 28, 7:01pm Top

Hi Paul - I've just been having a walk through of Zoom with my son as I have an online genealogy group meeting later today. Impressed with how it all works, I generally avoid all this type of technology.

My favourite Austens are 1) Northanger Abbey 2)Persuasion.

We got told on last night's tv news that there are enough potatoes being produced in New Zealand, that the whole population could live only on potatoes for the lockdown period and there would still be plenty left over.

160PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 7:25pm Top

>156 richardderus: Hahaha same to you, RD. At least you have your roomie somewhere else still?

>157 jnwelch: Yeah, I'm ok Joe. Got books. Got internet. Can communicate with loved ones. Got food. Got books (did I say that already?)

161PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 7:29pm Top

>158 AMQS: It was a Santa gift to me a few years ago and I finally got round to it and I am really pleased I did so, Anne.

>159 avatiakh: I haven't heard of zoom, Kerry, but I'll go and look it up.

We agree on the best Austen but are clearly in the minority.

I am sure that NZ is in the happy position of being able to easily feed all its people without any need to import anything at all.

162avatiakh
Mar 28, 8:37pm Top

>161 PaulCranswick: My son will be teaching his students guitar via Zoom, a learning curve for all of us during lockdown. Of course his laptop died on day 2 of lockdown so he's making do with an old one that I keep as backup.

My daughter and I love the 2007 movie of Northanger Abbey with JJ Feild and Felicity Jones.

163PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 9:00pm Top

>162 avatiakh: It does look an interesting platform, Kerry.

The adaptations of Austen's books are uniformly good and that one in particular IMHO.

164foggidawn
Mar 28, 11:36pm Top

Hi, Paul — trying to catch up on a few threads. I’ve enjoyed the Austen discussion. It’s been some time since I read most of them, so perhaps my ratings will change in future, but based on younger me’s opinions, I’d rank them:

1. Northanger Abbey
2. Sense and Sensibility
3. Pride and Prejudice
4. Persuasion
5. Mansfield Park
6. Emma

Also, like Amber, I’m so pleased that you enjoyed The Thief!

165PaulCranswick
Mar 28, 11:42pm Top

>164 foggidawn: So there is a significant little clique amongst us that prefers her first written work, Foggi!

166foggidawn
Mar 29, 12:00am Top

>165 PaulCranswick: It’s a fun book, though perhaps lighter than the others.

167PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 12:02am Top

>166 foggidawn: The tone is slightly different for sure, Foggi.

168Berly
Mar 29, 12:09am Top

Paul--Hope you get to watch Ozark soon--my hubby loves this series!! And have fun with the reading marathon this weekend.

169PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 12:18am Top

>168 Berly: I am putting it off until after the Readathon otherwise I won't get any reading done!

170PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 12:21am Top

This is for lovers of music.

One of my absolute favourite folk songs ever by the incomparable Fairport Convention sung by the dear departed angel-voiced Sandy Denny.

Somehow suitable for the times. The song still makes the hairs on my arm stand on end.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkOB57UcYk8

171humouress
Mar 29, 5:29am Top

>159 avatiakh: Um, yay? I hope your diet is more varied than that :0)

172karenmarie
Mar 29, 7:44am Top

Hi Paul!

>158 AMQS: I agree about car listening vs house listening, Anne. And re Lethal White, I’d never listened to it before but read it when it first came out. I’d forgotten most of it, and I do love the series.

>160 PaulCranswick: Got books. Got internet. Can communicate with loved ones. Got food. Got books (did I say that already?) Ditto. My ability to read anything more complicated than a mystery or Pride and Prejudice is pretty much shot right now, but I have 404 books tagged (mystery or thriller) AND tbr, so should be good for a bit.

How's Belle holding up with all this?

173jessibud2
Mar 29, 7:47am Top

>170 PaulCranswick: - I think I have that album (vinyl) somewhere downstairs, Paul. Such a great song. Thanks for posting that.

174PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 8:00am Top

>171 humouress: My poor antecedents in Ireland made just that mistake of over reliance!

>172 karenmarie: Books.Internet.Communication.Food.Books. A new mantra for the lockdown.

Belle is becoming a creature of the night and early morning. I slept well (for me) and rose at 6.00 am and she was at the living room table on the computer playing card games. I asked her why she didn't read but got one of her turn-to-stone looks.

175PaulCranswick
Edited: Mar 29, 8:08am Top

>173 jessibud2: Spurred me to do playlists for 1969 and 1968. So many great songs. I did 90 songs for 1969 and 80 for 1968. One song per artist per year.

I included this from Moody Blues for 1968 - Voices in the Sky

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPEMZteFjWc

And this one from 1969 by Harry Nilsson is for NYC and the hope that they kick the virus right over the Hudson River - I Guess the Lord Must Be in New York City

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2swOlajJ-zU

176ChelleBearss
Mar 29, 10:28am Top

Happy new(ish) thread!

>152 PaulCranswick: Glad you enjoyed The Thief. I am waiting for the new one to come out in August

177PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 10:37am Top

>176 ChelleBearss: There are a few to go at I see, Chelle, which is gratifying.

178witchyrichy
Mar 29, 10:56am Top

Stopping by to say hello and wish you well. Took a bit of a break from LT as I've been online nonstop reorganizing events and having meetings. I am used to working online but this has been crazy and I added 8 more hours next week late in the day Friday. Got added to the state's "continuity of learning" task force to advise on technology. I think our deadline for policies is Wednesday at 5 PM. Happy April Fool's to me!

179PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 10:58am Top

>178 witchyrichy: Lovely to see you, Karen. Sorry to see that you are so busy though it could be much worse of course.

180SirThomas
Mar 29, 11:39am Top

I wish you a wonderful rest of sunday, Paul - even if it doesn't take half an hour more ;-).
Stay well.

181PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 11:47am Top

>180 SirThomas: I have had a good restful day, Thomas.

182benitastrnad
Mar 29, 12:42pm Top

I am ready to start book 3 in the Queen's Thief series. It is King of Attolia. This has been a very good YA series with great plots and interesting characters. The Thief was a Newbery Prize Honor Book the year it was published and the I series is very popular. I often find myself wondering why Harry Potter got so much glory when I think this series is so much better. I think there are now 6 books in the series and the author says that the one coming out in August will be the last one. (Said with teary eyes).

183PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 1:08pm Top

>182 benitastrnad: Yes, the relative success of some books compared to others does surprise. Fifty Shades of Grey for example!

184avatiakh
Mar 29, 2:36pm Top

>171 humouress: They're just wanting to emphasize that there is no need to panic food buy, that NZ grows more fruit and veges than the population can get through. Anyway yesterday I burnt the potatoes I forgot I was cooking so I'm in the market for some more.

185PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 2:44pm Top

>184 avatiakh: Sliced potatoes on top of stew and cooked until nearly crisp in the oven; lightly floured potatoes roasted with the meat until near melt in the mouth. Both close to perfection and near to being spoiled!

186johnsimpson
Mar 29, 3:13pm Top

Hi Paul, hope all is well with you and that you are coping with what is going on, we are both fine mate and are now part of the COVID-19 Network for Walton group and are now co-ordinators for our estate so that if anyone self-isolating needs any help they contact us, if we cannot do what they want we contact fellow volunteers on our estate WhatsApp group to see who can help said resident.

I see i was outed about my coffee drinking but the first pot of the day is tea and the coffee is second drink before we have breakfast and then it is tea all the way.

Sending Yorkshire love and hugs mate.

187quondame
Edited: Mar 29, 5:08pm Top

>183 PaulCranswick: Amazon now has October 6, 2020 as the Kindle release date for Return of the Thief. Arrgh!

188banjo123
Mar 29, 5:46pm Top

happy Sunday, Paul, and thanks for the Moody Blues link!

189drneutron
Mar 29, 7:28pm Top

Happy Sunday evening!

190PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 8:21pm Top

>186 johnsimpson: Nice to hear from you, John.
Your coffee secret is safe with me.
I am not in the least surprised that you and Karen are at the forefront of helping those in your immediate community who most need it. You are both reasons why I still have faith in humanity.
I hope that the Government realises the need of the masses for its sport and that it will resume, if aid if necessary, as soon as possible.

Stay safe all of you.

>187 quondame: It is a series of books I will definitely follow through with, Susan. xx

191PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 8:22pm Top

>188 banjo123: Lovely tune, isn't it, Rhonda? I felt it was an appropriate one too reminding us of the beauty and vitalness of nature.

>189 drneutron: Nice to see you, Jim. How are we doing with that Rocket Ship?

192PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 8:24pm Top

As a stats man I am encouraged by the latest world figures for coronavirus in that, for the first time in 10 days, the increase in the numbers of cases and deaths is less than 10% daily. Doesn't yet apply to the USA or UK but it is the first sign that it is being arrested.

193Berly
Mar 29, 9:37pm Top

>192 PaulCranswick: I'll take that good news, even if its not quite happening in the US or UK yet. Hugs and thanks for the tunes!!

194PaulCranswick
Mar 29, 9:52pm Top

>193 Berly: Welcome Kimmers and I expect the figures to look demonstrably better within the next five days.

195humouress
Edited: Mar 30, 1:37am Top

>192 PaulCranswick: Definitely encouraging. Let’s hope the trend continues downwards.

As a stats man I’m sure you know the information is only as good as the data it’s based on and that is skewed for many countries because they just don’t have the resources. Italy, for instance, has a higher fatality to infection rate but that may be just because they can’t test all the suspect cases.

So weird; the Haze was an international incident but localised. This is worldwide and affects everyone we know. Staggering. And such a tiny organism to cause such a huge disaster.

196avatiakh
Mar 30, 2:02am Top

>185 PaulCranswick: Yum, but can't beat thinly sliced potatoes baked in cream and garlic.

197alcottacre
Mar 30, 6:16am Top

Happy Monday, Paul!

198ChelleBearss
Edited: Mar 30, 8:21am Top

>177 PaulCranswick: I'm a big fan of discovering series late so that there are many books already published to enjoy. I have very little patience these days lol

199PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 9:26am Top

>196 avatiakh: I get that Nina, but we are dealing with consistent data. The same deficiencies in reporting between the countries has existed in the figures for the last 12 days.
What can I say I am glass-half-full kinda guy.

>197 alcottacre: Yum. I do like that little darkened crunchy bit on top of the spud though when they are baked.
Erni made Persian rice (cooked with cranberries) with chicken, tomatoes and carrots today. Belle told her mummy likes this but me and Dad not so much. It was actually good but it took Belle an age to eat as she was picking out all the cranberries.

200PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 9:29am Top

>197 alcottacre: Yes, Monday evening here, Stasia. I had a short nap earlier as I had quite the headache and I took something that made me quite drowsy. Buzzing now and I have just watched the first episode of season 3 of Ozark. Brilliant, brilliant show.

>198 ChelleBearss: That is so unintentionally smart on my part, Chelle! I do like my series reading and need to get back to doing more of them and catching up on some of the ones I am falling behind with. I miss fict-fact.com for that.

201PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 9:33am Top

As most visitors know I keep stats of the top 140 threads (in terms of the number of posts) each year and I am pleased to say that collectively we just passed 40,000.

We are about 5 or 6 days ahead of last year and the trend is upwards. The various lockdowns most of us are facing has helped conversation between us all obviously.

It is wonderful to know that marooned in an admittedly comfortable apartment in the centre of Kuala Lumpur and looking out upon deserted friends, I have several hundred friends around the world willing to communicate with me and it makes us all less lonely and with a feeling of community.

202PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 11:38am Top

Sad to see that John Prine, that doyen of country folk music is critically ill and on a ventilator with coronavirus. I'll say a little prayer for him amongst the many.

This is a lovely rendition of In Spite of Ourselves - touching, bawdy and funny - much like the man.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8tTwXv4glY

203PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 12:04pm Top

Alan Merrill has died of coronavirus aged 69.

Who? He co-wrote ad sang the original version of I Love Rock n Roll which was later hit for Joan Jett. From 1975 this is the Arrows and, I am biased, I think it is better than Joan's cover.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AT_Pbtyid0

RIP Alan

204Storeetllr
Mar 30, 2:30pm Top

>175 PaulCranswick: Oh! The Moody Blues. I've got their "best of" album on CD and love to play it every now and then. Now would be a good time, I think. As far as kicking it over the Hudson, I'M living over the Hudson so let's kick it hard in the other direction, far out into the ocean where it can be washed away on the tide, okay? 😁

Glad you're hanging in there.

205katiekrug
Mar 30, 4:13pm Top

>204 Storeetllr: - Kicking it over the Hudson from NYC would be right at me, so yeah. No thanks...

206Caroline_McElwee
Mar 30, 6:22pm Top

>203 PaulCranswick: Great song, sad loss.

Glad you are hunkered down Paul. Hope the headache passed.

It was my non-working Monday. And I have a day off on Weds too, so a short three-day working week. I could so easily forget to log on ha. But my team are mega busy, as I will be tomorrow too.

207PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 8:22pm Top

>204 Storeetllr: The Moody Blues do seem suitable at the moment somehow don't they, Mary.

>204 Storeetllr: & >205 katiekrug: A little bit of geography is a dangerous thing. I was actually aiming at the Atlantic ocean; can I settle for "kick it into the Hudson River?"

208PaulCranswick
Mar 30, 8:25pm Top

>206 Caroline_McElwee: Headache is gone, Caroline, thank you. Tuesdays and Thursdays are the only days I am really called upon to earn my dough at the moment as I have conference calls with the Contract Administrators regarding the Supplementary Agreement we are trying to finalise on PNB118 to agree, amongst other things, a new completion date. The present shut-down doesn't help anyone in that respect.

Stay safe.

209PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 12:33am Top

Book # 40



The Librarian by Salley Vickers

Date of Publication : 2018
Pages : 385 pp
Origin of Author : UK

This is not high literature but enjoyable for all that. A young lady takes a job as Librarian in the children's section of the East Mole library in 1958 and becomes involved in the petty intrigues and politics of the library and the small town.

A satisfying slice of a Britain now long gone.

210PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 2, 6:53am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 1/12 The Librarian by Salley Vickers
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 2/12 Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 2/12
9. History - 2/12 - The English Civil War by David Clark
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 3/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy; The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 13 Year to Date - 40
Pages Read March - 3,159 Year to Date - 9,033
1001 Books March - 1 Year to Date - 4
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 101.90 Year to Date - 99.26

Gender of Authors 11 Female / 29 male

211benitastrnad
Edited: Mar 31, 6:50pm Top

NPR reported that Tomi De Paola died yesterday from complications following hip surgery. He was a multiple Caldecott Honor Book winner Strega Nona was one of his best known books and he even had a Newbery Honor book title 26 Fairmont Avenue. He was also a noted Italian cook and teacher. The last time I saw him on TV was a year ago when he was a guest chef on cookbook author Mary Ann Esposito's cooking show "Ciao Italia." This makes me sad as I loved his books.

212m.belljackson
Mar 31, 3:59pm Top

Paul - found the original at last >

"Yes, I must try to get out of here -

but where to go?"

Vincent Van Gogh

213PaulCranswick
Mar 31, 6:49pm Top

>211 benitastrnad: Wasn't familiar with his work, Benita, but it is sad for sure.

>212 m.belljackson: Yes, Marianne, Vincent's quote is appropriate! We have curfew here after 10.00 pm until 6.00 am daily so we (to quote Dylan) "ain't goin' nowhere". (How did Dylan win the Nobel Prize because that means we're going somewhere!?)

214benitastrnad
Mar 31, 6:54pm Top

It is very rare for a children's author to have won a Caldecott and Newbery Honor Award. The Caldecott award is given for illustrations and the Newbery is given for literary quality. Two different talents that can combine to make one great book or two separate great books. De Paola was good at both. Plus, all that wonderful cooking.

215PaulCranswick
Mar 31, 6:59pm Top

>214 benitastrnad: I also saw the comments for him on the Memoriam page, Benita. This virus is wreaking so much havoc on anyone over 75 that catches it. I saw today that the youngest death in the UK from the Coronavirus was recorded at 13, so we would be remiss to consider this only fatal to the older population.

216benitastrnad
Mar 31, 7:01pm Top

>215 PaulCranswick:
De Paola did not die from Covid -19. He died from having a broken hip and the surgery that he needed for that. In the US hip fractures are one of the leading causes of death in the elderly.

217jnwelch
Mar 31, 10:03pm Top

It’s fun to see Northanger Abby as the #1 Austen pick for some. I knew nothing about it when I first picked it up, and what really surprised me was how darn funny it was. I had no idea it was partly a spoof of the Gothic novels of the time. I can see why you put it up there.

218PaulCranswick
Mar 31, 11:19pm Top

>216 benitastrnad: Stand corrected, Benita. I do remember reading Being Mortal wherein the writer talks about the loss of balance in the elderly being a sign of dangerous deterioration.

>217 jnwelch: It is a novel wherein the author's voice is brilliantly rendered, Joe.

219EBT1002
Mar 31, 11:38pm Top

>1 PaulCranswick: Handsome young man there, brooding though he may be.

I know you're keeping the stats and I'm resisting the temptation to get caught up in them. I do have a competitive streak. Once I retire, I'm going to tear up the threads! :-)

220PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 12:22am Top

>219 EBT1002: Hahaha, Ellen, that is the spirit. I will put up the stats today. Numbers are about a week ahead of last year which is not bad.

You are fast approaching 1,000 posts which is not to be sneezed at!

221PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 2, 6:45am Top

Book # 41



The Holy Fox by Andrew Roberts

Date of Publication : 1991
Pages : 414 pp
Origin of Author : UK

I was taught the guff at school and in my overview textbooks of Lord Halifax, the arch-appeaser and one of "the Guilty Men" to blame for allowing the rise of Hitler and the Nazi menace.

This exceptional biography by the renowned Andrew Roberts redresses that somewhat by a very fair account of Edward Wood's public life. A liberal and far sighted Vice Consul of India and the first of the Government then supporting appeasement to realise its futility in dealing with a shamefully unreliable Hitler. His influence was critical in getting the rearmament process started in UK and in buying time for us to be ready to resist the Nazis. A wise head and brave counsel lost to Churchill when the latter removed him to secure further his own near dictatorial position at the first convenient moment.

Most famous for turning down the PM's job in favour of Churchill, I would hazard that Britain's place in the world may have been secured more successfully had he instead seized the chalice, as he was also much less oblivious to the threat of Japan.

Fascinating and recommended.

222PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 12:45am Top

The touchstones and book cover pictures are all playing up so I'll come back and edit the above post when they are more amenable.

223PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 8:43am Top

READING UPDATE

1. British Author Challenge - 2/12
2. British Poetry - 3/12 - Over the Moon by Imtiaz Dharkar
3. Contemporary British Fiction - 1/12 The Librarian by Salley Vickers
4. World Poetry - 3/12 Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara
5. 1001 Books - 2/12 Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
6. Plays - 3/12 - Ivanov by Anton Checkhov
7. American Author Challenge 2/12 -
8. Non-Fiction - 3/12 The Holy Fox by Andrew Roberts
9. History - 2/12 - The English Civil War by David Clark
10. Current Affairs - 3/12 Witness : Lessons from Elie Wiesel's Classroom by Ariel Burger
11. Booker Nominees - 1/12 -
12. Nobel Winners - 2/12 - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
13. Scandi - 2/12 - Snowblind by Ragnar Jonasson
14. Series Books - 2/12 - Past Tense by Lee Child
15. Thrillers/Mystery - 1/12
16. Classic Fiction - 1/12
17. 21st Century Fiction - 1/12
18. World Literature - 2/12 - The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli
19. Science Fiction / Fantasy - 3/12 - The Road by Cormac McCarthy; The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner
20. Pot Luck - 2/12

Books Completed March - 14 Year to Date - 41
Pages Read March - 3,573 Year to Date - 9,447
1001 Books March - 1 Year to Date - 4
Bookers March - 0 Year to Date - 1
Nobel Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 3
BAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 5
AAC Books March - 0 Year to Date - 2
Pulitzer Winners March - 1 Year to Date - 1

Daily Reading Ave March - 115.26 Year to Date - 103.81

Gender of Authors 11 Female / 30 male

224richardderus
Apr 1, 1:35am Top

>221 PaulCranswick: The victors rewrite their own historiography as well as the defeated's, but Halifax really got nailed. I'm glad this corrective exists.

225PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 1:58am Top

>224 richardderus: Yes that is certainly true, RD. Churchill's war memoirs/"history" read magnificently (I have read the first two) but I am sure places hyperbole above accuracy.

226PaulCranswick
Edited: Apr 1, 8:42am Top

Reading Plans for April.

The Females by Wolfgang Hilbig
Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo (BAC) BOOKER
In the Falling Snow by Caryl Phillips (BAC)
Waverley by Sir Walter Scott (BAC)
Selected Poems : 1950-2012 by Adrienne Rich
Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O'Neill (NOBEL WINNER)
The Reivers by Willam Faulkner (PULITZER FICTION)
John Adams by David McCullough (AAC)
Look We Have Coming to Dover by Daljit Nagra
The Cold War by John Lewis Gaddis
Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott
Frozen Moment by Camilla Ceder
One False Move by Robert Goddard
The Elected Member by Bernice Rubens
The Janus Stone by Elly Griffiths

Let's see whether I can get any further than that.

227karenmarie
Apr 1, 9:01am Top

Hi Paul!

Congrats on your reading so far this year. Your April plan looks ambitious but doable. Good luck.

228PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 9:28am Top

>227 karenmarie: Thanks Karen. I read 11 books in the last 14 days so I am fairly confident of making a decent fist of April's reading!

229ChelleBearss
Apr 1, 10:11am Top

>200 PaulCranswick: Agreed! I miss getting the emails from them when a new book was coming out in the series. I think Amazon has a feature like that (might be just USA site though) but I haven't had time to look into it and really I just have too many series to update

230PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 10:12am Top

>229 ChelleBearss: Yeah I am a bit lost with the series but I am tracing back over my last nine years of reading to give me some idea!

231ChelleBearss
Edited: Apr 1, 10:18am Top

>230 PaulCranswick: Periodically I just google my favourite authors to see if any have new books out. I found out that Kathy Reichs finally published a new Tempe Brennan novel after taking a few years off for health reasons. A Conspiracy Of Bones

232PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 10:21am Top

>231 ChelleBearss: I use a UK site called fantasticfiction.com, Chelle which is very good.

233arubabookwoman
Apr 1, 12:07pm Top

Passing through to say hello, and hope you and yours continue to stay well. Kiran is very handsome indeed. It must be difficult with half your family halfway around the world. Our 5 kids are 3000 miles away, with 3 of them in the US epicenter NYC so I know how it feels.

Our move to Florida is still scheduled for 4/15. But, since Trump is mostly leaving things up to the 50 states, and I am quite satisfied with my current state of Washington’s quick and aggressive response, and exceedingly and increasingly dismayed with Florida’s failure to adequately respond, we are having second
thoughts, although the move was already delayed once for the bone marrow transplant. Our son in Florida is urging us to go through with the move now; other of our kids are urging us to delay. Help!

We go back to the Hutch transplant center next week for the one year follow up. Perhaps they will have some advice.

234PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 12:10pm Top

>233 arubabookwoman: You know how it feels to have a disparate clan, Deborah!
You have time still to decide to wait a little bit longer to make the trip. It is a long way and the travel and airports will take their toll on your respective immune systems.

Take care and stay safe, Deborah. x

235richardderus
Apr 1, 12:15pm Top

>226 PaulCranswick: Oh, you're reading Rotherweird this month too! I'm planning to make it my Read-a-thon book for this coming weekend.

236PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 12:43pm Top

>226 PaulCranswick: Then I'll join you with it dear fellow.

237BLBera
Apr 1, 2:20pm Top

>226 PaulCranswick: That is very ambitious! Good luck.

238richardderus
Apr 1, 2:45pm Top

April is National Poetry Month on my blog! I will Celebrate The Art all April long!

239Caroline_McElwee
Apr 1, 3:02pm Top

>209 PaulCranswick: I like Vickers, but this wasn't a keeper for me, despite the lovely book itself Paul.

240Dejah_Thoris
Apr 1, 3:07pm Top

Just dropping by to say hi, Paul. And your reading plans for April look excellent!

241alcottacre
Apr 1, 7:30pm Top

>201 PaulCranswick: It is wonderful to know that marooned in an admittedly comfortable apartment in the centre of Kuala Lumpur and looking out upon deserted friends, I have several hundred friends around the world willing to communicate with me and it makes us all less lonely and with a feeling of community.

I agree with that sentiment, even if I am in Texas. I am loving the weekend Readathons, for instance.

>209 PaulCranswick: >221 PaulCranswick: Adding those to the BlackHole!

242PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 8:46pm Top

>237 BLBera: Will have two of them finished today already, Beth.

>238 richardderus: I am a little short of breath! RD's blog and poultry?

243PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 8:47pm Top

>239 Caroline_McElwee: It was very light reading, Caroline. Not too much depth to it and the morality of some of the characters was certainly suspect!

>240 Dejah_Thoris: Lovely to see you, Princess.

244PaulCranswick
Apr 1, 8:49pm Top

>241 alcottacre: The readathons are something to make my week look forward too, Stasia, and enables a feeling of camaraderie even though we are all in separate locations.

245streamsong
Apr 2, 12:58am Top

Happy New Thread, Paul!

As I was catching up on your last few threads, I was listening to this:

https://www.pbs.org/video/john-prine-8tbu28/?fbclid=IwAR1Os7w6sI63HTlQkq4R7JWG2k...

I don't know if you can access it, but I hope you can. - it was a PBS show featuring John Prine. He's been a favorite of mine since the 70's.

246PaulCranswick
Apr 2, 1:08am Top

>245 streamsong: Hahaha novel approach, Janet, as I am just closing this one!

I really like John Prine and have my fingers and toes crossed for him.

This topic was continued by PAUL C INTO THE ROARING 20S - Part 10.

Group: 75 Books Challenge for 2020

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