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Reinventing the Bazaar: A Natural History of…
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Reinventing the Bazaar: A Natural History of Markets (edition 2003)

by John McMillan

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211398,102 (3.8)None
From the wild swings of the stock market to the online auctions of eBay to the unexpected twists of the world's post-Communist economies, markets have suddenly become quite visible. We now have occasion to ask, "What makes these institutions work? How important are they? How can we improve them?" Taking us on a lively tour of a world we once took for granted, John McMillan offers examples ranging from a camel trading fair in India to the $20 million per day Aalsmeer flower market in the Netherlands to the global trade in AIDS drugs. Eschewing ideology, he shows us that markets are neither magical nor immoral. Rather, they are powerful if imperfect tools, the best we've found for improving our living standards. A New York Times Notable Book.… (more)
Member:mschetti
Title:Reinventing the Bazaar: A Natural History of Markets
Authors:John McMillan
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2003), Paperback, 388 pages
Collections:Your library
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Reinventing the Bazaar: A Natural History of Markets by John McMillan

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Arrived Lausanne
  LOM-Lausanne | Mar 19, 2020 |
경제,Market History
  leese | Nov 23, 2009 |
When I picked up this book, I thought it was going to be a more social science-oriented view of markets. The title calls itself a 'Natural History of Markets'. Instead, the book is very much a financial look at how and why markets function, when they appear, and how the private vs state balance can often determine success of markets. Many of the anecdotes are interesting, and overall, using economic theory, the author maintains a balanced view of free market and state regulation.

However, the book suffers needlessly from a disjointed presentation, repetitive points (some points are repeated numerous times in just a few paragraphs), and, at times, missing opportunities to offer greater insight into specific examples. Much of the book read like a set of articles loosely related to one another. The last third of the book is really quite dry and disinterested in conveying to the reader, at least it was so to me.

A decent financial book with some interesting examples of market behaviors, but not what I expected from the title, and not covering a lot of new ground for anyone with a reasonable knowledge of markets. Three stars. ( )
1 vote IslandDave | Mar 5, 2009 |
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From the wild swings of the stock market to the online auctions of eBay to the unexpected twists of the world's post-Communist economies, markets have suddenly become quite visible. We now have occasion to ask, "What makes these institutions work? How important are they? How can we improve them?" Taking us on a lively tour of a world we once took for granted, John McMillan offers examples ranging from a camel trading fair in India to the $20 million per day Aalsmeer flower market in the Netherlands to the global trade in AIDS drugs. Eschewing ideology, he shows us that markets are neither magical nor immoral. Rather, they are powerful if imperfect tools, the best we've found for improving our living standards. A New York Times Notable Book.

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