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How to Dunk a Doughnut: The Science Of…
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How to Dunk a Doughnut: The Science Of Everyday Life (edition 2003)

by Len Fisher

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3231054,372 (3.39)4
"In 1998, Len Fisher attracted media attention around the world with his experiments on the physics of biscuit dunking. His studies resulted in the receipt of a spoof I?gNobel Prize' award, a letter of commendation from the Government Chief Scientist, and a nomination by The Times newspaper as an E?nemy of the People'." "Here he tells the true story behind this and other projects in which he looks at everyday phenomena and reveals how they can be used as a key to open a door to science. In doing so he shares his insider's perspective of what scientists do, why they do it and how they go about it." "The book provides scientific answers to such familiar questions as how to dunk a biscuit, how to check a supermarket bill quickly, how to use DIY tools more efficiently and how to use the laws of thermodynamics to boil the perfect egg. It shows the reader how to catch a ball scientifically, which vegetables absorb the most gravy, and even how science can improve your sex life."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
Member:mfigroid
Title:How to Dunk a Doughnut: The Science Of Everyday Life
Authors:Len Fisher
Info:Arcade Publishing (2003), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Trivia, Science

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How to Dunk a Doughnut: The Science of Everyday Life by Len Fisher

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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Fisher's offering is a work written by a scientist but well and accurately aimed at the non-scientist. Where many before him have failed, Fisher has succeeded in crafting a work which does well at dancing the line between too technical and downright insulting. The author very carefully defines his terms once upon first use and then rightly expects his audience to remember them. He is accessible without being annoying.

As to his content, Fisher is widely varied while staying fundamentally true to his background in physics. In his 200 pages he touches on liquid uptake of permeable foods (the eponymous dunking of the doughnut), the protein transition of cooked eggs, the physics of simple tools, math tricks to make your trip to the supermarket less costly, boomerangs, beer foam and ball games. He closes with chapters on the physics behind the sense of taste and human sexuality.

Throughout, Fisher provides not only factual content but historical anecdotes to lighten the mood a bit. Most memorably for me, he relates the brief tale of an Australian man in the 1930s who protested loudly and publicly that the use of an erect penis during intercourse was simply too forceful. He argued that a flaccid state was more respectful and appropriate and one that allowed the woman to draw the instrument of insemination into herself at a time of her own choosing. Personally I suspect this was a case of a movement founded in the fertile ground of a personal shortcoming but regardless of the cause for the statement, it does give one a proper sense for the character of the book.
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  slavenrm | Apr 28, 2013 |
Ok, this one completely appeals to my inner geek. I was trained as a scientist but it's been a while since I've done anything that looks like science. This satisfies that desire to unlock how the world works. In this case, the book is a series of short essays on particular subjects that may sound like daft questions, but have some need to understand the science in order to answer the question. So the title, "how to dunk a doughnut" starts with a discussion of the difference between doughnuts & biscuits and perfects the art of the biscuit dunk. yes, it's light hearted and (scientifically) superficial, but it was a fun read. A lot of the applications are food related - the author being a food scientist - but that at least makes them readily applicable by the non scientist. I imagine any food scientist would find it trivial in the extreme, but for a non scientist or someone at school, it would be a good general informative book. i liked it, but like I said, my inner geek needs feeding every now & then. ( )
  Helenliz | Mar 31, 2013 |
Fisher's offering is a work written by a scientist but well and accurately aimed at the non-scientist. Where many before him have failed, Fisher has succeeded in crafting a work which does well at dancing the line between too technical and downright insulting. The author very carefully defines his terms once upon first use and then rightly expects his audience to remember them. He is accessible without being annoying.

As to his content, Fisher is widely varied while staying fundamentally true to his background in physics. In his 200 pages he touches on liquid uptake of permeable foods (the eponymous dunking of the doughnut), the protein transition of cooked eggs, the physics of simple tools, math tricks to make your trip to the supermarket less costly, boomerangs, beer foam and ball games. He closes with chapters on the physics behind the sense of taste and human sexuality.

Throughout, Fisher provides not only factual content but historical anecdotes to lighten the mood a bit. Most memorably for me, he relates the brief tale of an Australian man in the 1930s who protested loudly and publicly that the use of an erect penis during intercourse was simply too forceful. He argued that a flaccid state was more respectful and appropriate and one that allowed the woman to draw the instrument of insemination into herself at a time of her own choosing. Personally I suspect this was a case of a movement founded in the fertile ground of a personal shortcoming but regardless of the cause for the statement, it does give one a proper sense for the character of the book. ( )
  slavenrm | Mar 10, 2013 |
How to dunk a doughnut was a wonderful mix of good writing, and science! A solid book of applying science to every-day life is a good thing all in itself, but Fisher's writing did not come off as mere scientific babbling. Though the actual science was often complicated, the method of writing and story telling made it incredibly accessible. There certainly needs to be more writing like this! ( )
  tyroeternal | Jan 31, 2009 |
Fisher takes complex scientific theories and ideas and helps the lay-man understand how science affects everything in the world. Interesting ideas about the usefulness of hand tools and cooking show the reader a different world that we all take for granted. An entertaining read for anyone who like Mr. Wizard as a kid. ( )
  NielsenGW | Aug 3, 2008 |
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