HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972

by Lucy R. Lippard

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1324161,736 (4.13)None
In Six Years Lucy R. Lippard documents the chaotic network of ideas that has been labeled conceptual art. The book is arranged as an annotated chronology into which is woven a rich collection of original documents--including texts by and taped discussions among and with the artists involved and by Lippard, who has also provided a new preface for this edition. The result is a book with the character of a lively contemporary forum that offers an invaluable record of the thinking of the artists--a historical survey and essential reference book for the period.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 4 of 4
In Six Years Lucy R. Lippard documents the chaotic network of ideas that has been labeled conceptual art. The book is arranged as an annotated chronology into which is woven a rich collection of original documents―including texts by and taped discussions among and with the artists involved and by Lippard, who has also provided a new preface for this edition. The result is a book with the character of a lively contemporary forum that offers an invaluable record of the thinking of the artists―a historical survey and essential reference book for the period.
  petervanbeveren | May 13, 2021 |


Lucy R. Lippard explores a number of modern art movements flowering in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including minimal art, earth art and conceptual art. It is this last form of art I find most fascinating, especially as put forth by artist Sol LeWitt in his classic piece “Sentences on Conceptual Art” – 35 brief statements outlining the philosophy behind what it means to create as a conceptual artist. As a way of sharing a portion of LeWitt’s work, below are 10 of his 35 sentences along with my brief comments:

“The artist's will is secondary to the process he initiates from idea to completion. His willfulness may only be ego.” --------- One key area of Sol LeWittt’s artistic vision highlights the interplay between ideas, geometry and perception, the way the mind, the eye and physical space interact. In LeWitt’s own words: “When you draw various parts of a cube on paper there is order but when the drawing is converted into three dimensions those partial cubes become chaos. However, when you walk around the completed work and look at it from different lines of sight, those cubes becomes orderly again as you begin to untangle the puzzle and engage your intellectual processes of problem solving.” LeWitt’s art originates from very simple ideas wherein he develops those ideas into complex and playful forms. He then welcomes the viewer to partake in a visual dialogue with his creations.



“The concept and idea are different. The former implies a general direction while the latter is the component. Ideas implement the concept.” --------- So, ideas are the pieces or building blocks of an overarching concept. Take for example the construction below - the multi-cube would be the concept and the many various pieces would correspond to separate, individual ideas.



“For each work of art that becomes physical there are many variations that do not.” ---------- For each created art work there would be all those modifications and possibilities that were in the mind of the artist at some point during the creation, some considered seriously, others not so seriously, then put aside. Theoretically, all those potential modifications could have taken on physical form but they did not, in fact, receive form.



“The conventions of art are altered by works of art.” ---------- Turns out, Sol LeWitt has had much influence in the art world. He has transformed the idea and practice of drawing as well as redefining the connection between an idea and the art that idea produces. With LeWitt there is a shift in focus from the presence of the artist physically and directly creating the work to the artist’s ideas behind the work and how the ideas surpass each work itself. In this sense, LeWitt is very much like an architect designing and setting out plans for a structure without participating in the actual material, physical side of setting the foundation or erecting that structure.



“Ideas can be works of art; they are in a chain of development that may eventually find some form. All ideas need not be made physical.” ---------- I myself designed what I judge to be a cross between Piet Mondrian and a Zen garden. First, I took a sheet of 6’ x 4’ white Formica and placed this Formica sheet within a white frame and then placed it on a table. Next, I painted wooden half-circle nobs, each nob 2’' in diameter, in bold colors – black, white, yellow, blue, red. Rather than rocks set out on the sand of a Zen gardens, the viewer/participant takes the colored nobs and sets each one, as few as 2 or 3 or as many as 20 or 30, out on the white Formica. Applying LeWitt’s statement here that ideas can be works of art that need not be made physical, outlining my concept of this work of art is enough – you can see in your mind’s eye what I have created and you can, in turn, orchestrate the combinations of colored pieces on white Formica. Actually, you could take the next step - with my simple specifications, you could construct a Mondrian-Zen Garden of your own.

“Banal ideas cannot be rescued by beautiful execution.” ---------- If my concept of a Mondrian - Zen Garden strikes you as flat or banal or superficial, please feel free to apply this Sol LeWitt sentence to my conceptual art!

“The artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.” --------- South African author J. M. Coetzee was once asked to answer the philosophical questions undergirding one of his novels. Coetzee replied that he is only the author; he doesn’t pretend to have answers to the philosophical challenges he poses; rather, as an author of fiction, his job is simply to present those challenges vividly to the reader.

“It is difficult to bungle a good idea.” ----------- LeWitt must be thinking specifically of Conceptual Art with its emphasis on the concept as opposed to the various stages of execution since, when it comes to other forms of art, it is not only not difficult to bungle a good idea, it is as easy as pie. Such bungling is done all the time by artists.

“When an artist learns his craft too well he makes slick art.” ---------- For LeWitt, the artist is really a thinker. LeWitt’s Conceptual Art is radical not because of the materials it uses but the ideas behind those materials. The idea is the machine that makes the work of art; execution is a perfunctory affair. Again, as noted above, the artist’s hand need not be present. LeWitt’s wall drawings act like a musical score where the artist is the composer - similar to a musical composition that can be played simultaneously by any number of musicians all over the globe, LeWitt’s wall art may be painted simultaneously by many artists in multiple spaces.

“These sentences comment on art, but are not art.” ---------- Ha! What is the sound of one conceptual artist writing? ( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |


Lucy R. Lippard explores a number of modern art movements flowering in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including minimal art, earth art and conceptual art. It is this last form of art I find most fascinating, especially as put forth by artist Sol LeWitt in his classic piece “Sentences on Conceptual Art” – 35 brief statements outlining the philosophy behind what it means to create as a conceptual artist. As a way of sharing a portion of LeWitt’s work, below are 10 of his 35 sentences along with my brief comments:

“The artist's will is secondary to the process he initiates from idea to completion. His willfulness may only be ego.” --------- One key area of Sol LeWittt’s artistic vision highlights the interplay between ideas, geometry and perception, the way the mind, the eye and physical space interact. In LeWitt’s own words: “When you draw various parts of a cube on paper there is order but when the drawing is converted into three dimensions those partial cubes become chaos. However, when you walk around the completed work and look at it from different lines of sight, those cubes becomes orderly again as you begin to untangle the puzzle and engage your intellectual processes of problem solving.” LeWitt’s art originates from very simple ideas wherein he develops those ideas into complex and playful forms. He then welcomes the viewer to partake in a visual dialogue with his creations.


“The concept and idea are different. The former implies a general direction while the latter is the component. Ideas implement the concept.” --------- So, ideas are the pieces or building blocks of an overarching concept. Take for example the construction below - the multi-cube would be the concept and the many various pieces would correspond to separate, individual ideas.


“For each work of art that becomes physical there are many variations that do not.” ---------- For each created art work there would be all those modifications and possibilities that were in the mind of the artist at some point during the creation, some considered seriously, others not so seriously, then put aside. Theoretically, all those potential modifications could have taken on physical form but they did not, in fact, receive form.


“The conventions of art are altered by works of art.” ---------- Turns out, Sol LeWitt has had much influence in the art world. He has transformed the idea and practice of drawing as well as redefining the connection between an idea and the art that idea produces. With LeWitt there is a shift in focus from the presence of the artist physically and directly creating the work to the artist’s ideas behind the work and how the ideas surpass each work itself. In this sense, LeWitt is very much like an architect designing and setting out plans for a structure without participating in the actual material, physical side of setting the foundation or erecting that structure.


“Ideas can be works of art; they are in a chain of development that may eventually find some form. All ideas need not be made physical.” ---------- I myself designed what I judge to be a cross between Piet Mondrian and a Zen garden. First, I took a sheet of 6’ x 4’ white Formica and placed this Formica sheet within a white frame and then placed it on a table. Next, I painted wooden half-circle nobs, each nob 2’' in diameter, in bold colors – black, white, yellow, blue, red. Rather than rocks set out on the sand of a Zen gardens, the viewer/participant takes the colored nobs and sets each one, as few as 2 or 3 or as many as 20 or 30, out on the white Formica. Applying LeWitt’s statement here that ideas can be works of art that need not be made physical, outlining my concept of this work of art is enough – you can see in your mind’s eye what I have created and you can, in turn, orchestrate the combinations of colored pieces on white Formica. Actually, you could take the next step - with my simple specifications, you could construct a Mondrian-Zen Garden of your own.

“Banal ideas cannot be rescued by beautiful execution.” ---------- If my concept of a Mondrian - Zen Garden strikes you as flat or banal or superficial, please feel free to apply this Sol LeWitt sentence to my conceptual art!

“The artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.” --------- South African author J. M. Coetzee was once asked to answer the philosophical questions undergirding one of his novels. Coetzee replied that he is only the author; he doesn’t pretend to have answers to the philosophical challenges he poses; rather, as an author of fiction, his job is simply to present those challenges vividly to the reader.

“It is difficult to bungle a good idea.” ----------- LeWitt must be thinking specifically of Conceptual Art with its emphasis on the concept as opposed to the various stages of execution since, when it comes to other forms of art, it is not only not difficult to bungle a good idea, it is as easy as pie. Such bungling is done all the time by artists.

“When an artist learns his craft too well he makes slick art.” ---------- For LeWitt, the artist is really a thinker. LeWitt’s Conceptual Art is radical not because of the materials it uses but the ideas behind those materials. The idea is the machine that makes the work of art; execution is a perfunctory affair. Again, as noted above, the artist’s hand need not be present. LeWitt’s wall drawings act like a musical score where the artist is the composer - similar to a musical composition that can be played simultaneously by any number of musicians all over the globe, LeWitt’s wall art may be painted simultaneously by many artists in multiple spaces.

“These sentences comment on art, but are not art.” ---------- Ha! What is the sound of one conceptual artist writing? ( )
  GlennRussell | Feb 16, 2017 |
Realization of space in the 20th century
  patsplendore | Aug 17, 2009 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

In Six Years Lucy R. Lippard documents the chaotic network of ideas that has been labeled conceptual art. The book is arranged as an annotated chronology into which is woven a rich collection of original documents--including texts by and taped discussions among and with the artists involved and by Lippard, who has also provided a new preface for this edition. The result is a book with the character of a lively contemporary forum that offers an invaluable record of the thinking of the artists--a historical survey and essential reference book for the period.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Essential source book of documentation of the Conceptual Art, Land Art, Earth Art, Arte Povera, Minimal Art, Performance Art, Video Art movements. Documents the activities, day by day, month by month, year by year of artists including Vito Acconci, Bas Jan Ader, Dennis Adrian, Carl Andre, Eleanor Antin, Keith Arnatt, Art-Language, Richard Artschwager, Michael Asher, David Askevold, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Frederick Barthelme, N.E. Thing Co., Josef Beuys, Mel Bochner, Alighiero Boetti, Stanley Brouwn, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Donald Burgy, Ian Burn, Jack Burnham, James Lee Byars, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Jan Dibbets, Peter Downsbrough, Gerald Ferguson, Rafael Ferrer, Barry Flanagan, Gilbert & George, Dan Graham, Guerrilla Art Action Group, Hans Haacke, Charles Harrison, Michael Heizer, Douglas Huebler, Peter Hutchinson, Stephen Kaltenbach, Allan Kaprow, On Kawara, Joseph Kosuth, Christine Kozlov, John Latham, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Lee Lozano, Bruce McLean, Walter de Maria, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Adrian Piper, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Sigmar Polke, Mel Ramsden, Allen Ruppersberg, Edward Ruscha, Robert Ryman, Gerry Schum, Richard Serra, Willoughby Sharp, Seth Siegelaub, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Michael Snow, Keith Sonnier, Athena Tacha Spear, Bernar Venet, Wolf Vostell, Franz Erhard Walther, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, William Wiley, Ian Wilson, La Monte Young and others. -- Specific Object
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.13)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 4
3.5
4 2
4.5 1
5 5

GenreThing

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,377,258 books! | Top bar: Always visible