HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge by…
Loading...

Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge

by Helena P Schrader

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1031,320,769 (4.33)None
The smaller of twins, born long after two elder brothers, Leonidas was considered an afterthought from birth -- even by his mother. Lucky not to be killed for being undersized, he was not raised as a prince like his eldest brother, Cleomenes, who was heir to the throne, but instead had to endure the harsh upbringing of ordinary Spartan youth. Barefoot, always a little hungry, and subject to harsh discipline, Leonidas had to prove himself worthy of Spartan citizenship. Struggling to survive without disgrace, he never expected that one day he would be king or chosen to command the combined Greek forces fighting a Persian invasion. But these were formative years that would one day make him the most famous Spartan of them all: the hero of Thermopylae. This is the first book in a trilogy of biographical novels about Leonidas of Sparta. This first book describes his childhood in the infamous Spartan agoge. The second will focus on his years as an ordinary citizen, and the third will describe his reign and death. About the Author Helena P. Schrader holds a PhD in history from the University of Hamburg, which she earned with her groundbreaking biography of General Friedrich Olbricht, the mastermind behind the Valkyrie plot against Hitler. She has published four nonfiction works on modern history and has been published in academic journals including Sparta: Journal of Ancient Spartan and Greek History. Helena has done extensive research on ancient and archaic Sparta. She has combined her research with common sense and a deep understanding of human nature to create a refreshingly unorthodox portrayal of Spartan society in this biographical trilogy of Leonidas, as well as in her three previously published novels, The Olympic Charioteer, Are They Singing in Sparta? and Spartan Slave, Spartan Queen. Visit her website at www.helena-schrader.com or learn more about Sparta from her website Sparta Reconsidered at www.elysiumgates.com/ helena.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
detail rich without a text-book or teachy-feel.

I enjoyed the treatment of equestrian details, but also the consideration for different generations & genders as in the author's other books I've read.

( )
  nkmunn | Nov 17, 2018 |
Not quite a should-be classic, but I might change my mind after reading the rest of the trilogy. This first volume of Schrader's trilogy on life of Spartan King Leonidas was enthralling from first page to last. There's not much on his life historically; the author tells us she has invented most of this Bildungsroman. It's also a way for the author to explain different aspects of Spartan life. This particular novel concentrates on Leonidas's school years in the agoge, from admission at 7 to full Spartan citizenship at 21: "graduation ceremony", as it were. Each chapter covers one full school year focusing on a major adventure and Leonidas's growth from boy to man. Along with a poor but intelligent classmate for whom Leonidas pays tuition and other fees, Alkander, Leonidas's other best friend, Prokles, is also a classmate, the latest generation of the author's fictional Spartan family from other novels unrelated to this trilogy. The three boys are inseparable.

Schrader's done a marvelous job in painting a picture of ancient Sparta and her people. Her characters were so lifelike and realistic I felt I got to know them. I haven't read the other books in the trilogy yet, but I can see where the values inculcated in Leonidas's childhood will influence the rest of his life.

Outstanding were his phouxir or fox-time [part of the curriculum--period of time he was given a small knife and told to survive on his own in the wild] and, due to his own [he admits it] stupidity, kidnapping but fortuitous rescue. As an eirene, a young man on the verge of becoming a citizen, he supervises a group of teenage boys; this is his first taste of leadership.

This novel is most highly recommended. I have the other two sequels in hand to read. ( )
  janerawoof | Jan 18, 2015 |
Excellent book, I hardly ever read anything fiction historical or otherwise but this book is EXCELLENT! ( )
  Luftwaffe_Flak | Feb 7, 2014 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
The smaller of twins, born long after two elder brothers, Leonidas was considered an afterthought from birth -- even by his mother. Lucky not to be killed for being undersized, he was not raised as a prince like his eldest brother, Cleomenes, who was heir to the throne, but instead had to endure the harsh upbringing of ordinary Spartan youth. Barefoot, always a little hungry, and subject to harsh discipline, Leonidas had to prove himself worthy of Spartan citizenship. Struggling to survive without disgrace, he never expected that one day he would be king or chosen to command the combined Greek forces fighting a Persian invasion. But these were formative years that would one day make him the most famous Spartan of them all: the hero of Thermopylae.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.33)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 2
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,909,546 books! | Top bar: Always visible