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Okay for Now (2011)

by Gary D. Schmidt

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Doug Swieteck

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,7251228,409 (4.42)75
As a fourteen-year-old who just moved to a new town, with no friends, an abusive father, and a louse for an older brother, Doug Swieteck has all the stats stacked against him until he finds an ally in Lil Spicer--a fiery young lady. Together, they find a safe haven in the local library, inspiration in learning about the plates of John James Audubon's birds, and a hilarious adventure on a Broadway stage.… (more)
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» See also 75 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 122 (next | show all)
This and Schmidt's other book, [b:The Wednesday Wars|556136|The Wednesday Wars|Gary D. Schmidt|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1442044636s/556136.jpg|2586820], seemed slightly similar in that they start out in a cramped hole and you feel like reality is just crushing you. But then, slowly, it opens out like a flower. And you can breathe again. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
This is a companion book to “The Wednesday Wars” because there are overlapping characters. However, both books can stand on their own. Doug Swieteck faces a lot challenges that many teens face: moving, family problems, and difficulty in school. Luckily, Doug has many caring adults to help him face his troubles. This book is a powerful reminder that just one caring person that sees past a façade is enough to help a troubled teen blossom into a talented and kind young man. This book is National Book Award Finalist.
  DaynaVH | Jul 19, 2021 |
This one did not do much for me. Boy moves from New York City to small town upstate and does not fit in. Struggles to make friends, and finds one in the daughter of the deli owner. Has to deal with his abusive father, miscreant brother, his illiteracy, and his war-injured brother. Meanwhile, he makes something of himself and finds redemption in returning auctioned Audubon originals, cut from a book, to the local library. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
teen fiction. Of the 4 mock-newbery contestants I've read (for 2012) so far, this is my favorite, though it's too bad the cover inspires nothing. The ending is wrapped up a bit too neatly (alcoholic father redeems himself, shell-shocked Vietnam-vet brother who formerly tormented his younger brothers now enjoys life again, main character succeeds in school despite not being able to read only months prior, PE teacher stops picking on him, and girlfriend/love interest just may survive whatever terrible disease she's been mysteriously struck with). That said, all of the things said about Gary Schmidt are true--he does capture the boy's sentiments perfectly, without overstatement. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Good Book! Kept me looking back and it kept me on my toes. ( )
  AlizarinCrimson | Jan 7, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 122 (next | show all)
Bad-boy Doug Swieteck from The Wednesday Wars (rev. 7/07)—grudgingly respected for his bravado (he knew 410 ways to get a teacher to hate you) but feared because of his bullying older brother—is back in a stand-alone story. Readers meet Doug’s mean-spirited father, a man Doug dislikes but unconsciously emulates. When the family moves upstate after Mr. Swieteck’s temper gets him fired, Doug’s discontent mirrors his father’s. They live in a “stupid” town, in a house Doug christens “The Dump,” and people sit on stoops because there isn’t “any boring thing else to do in boring Marysville.” But what “boring” Marysville, New York, offers Doug is something unexpected: kindness and a future. He gets a part-time job; meets Lil, a sweet love interest; has teachers willing to teach him (as Schmidt gradually reveals, his need is dire); and, above all, is captivated by a book of Audubon bird prints when a caring librarian helps Doug discover a talent for composition and art appreciation. Schmidt incorporates a myriad of historical events from the 1968 setting (the moon landing, a broken brother returning from Vietnam, the My Lai massacre) that make some of the improbable plot turns (the father’s sudden redemption, for example) all the more unconvincing. Still, Doug’s story emerges through a distinctive voice that reflects how one beat-up kid can become a young man who knows that the future holds “so much for him to find.”
added by Ms.Resler | editHorn Guide Review
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gary D. Schmidtprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hoppe, LincolnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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My dear Anne, all of these pages are for you - except a few of them. Those are for Mark Hutchins, of New Portland Hill, Maine. You'll know which ones are his. But the rest are all yours, because I love you.
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Joe Pepitone once gave me his New York Yankees baseball cap.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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As a fourteen-year-old who just moved to a new town, with no friends, an abusive father, and a louse for an older brother, Doug Swieteck has all the stats stacked against him until he finds an ally in Lil Spicer--a fiery young lady. Together, they find a safe haven in the local library, inspiration in learning about the plates of John James Audubon's birds, and a hilarious adventure on a Broadway stage.

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The dump is what Doug Swieteck calls his new home in upstate New York. It is 1968, and Vietnam War veterans are returning, Apollo space missions to the moon are under way, and Dough's hero, Joe Pepitone, is having another good year for the Yankees.
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