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The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett
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The Carpet People (original 1971; edition 1993)

by Terry Pratchett (Author)

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2,044296,029 (3.58)53
The Munrungs cross the Carpet to find a new home after their village is destroyed by the powerful and mysterious natural force Fray.
Member:communard
Title:The Carpet People
Authors:Terry Pratchett (Author)
Info:Corgi (1993), Edition: paperback / softback
Collections:Your library
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The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett (1971)

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» See also 53 mentions

English (26)  Polish (1)  German (1)  French (1)  All languages (29)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
audiobook; fantasy (miniature civilizations living in the carpet)
as this was mostly written when Pratchett was 17 years old (according to the preface), it's not his best work. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Pratchett's first book was sweet and short and filled with familiar themes that he'd return to again and again, sometimes with less success and oftentimes with more. I liked it quite a bit and I think it'd be great for kids but I wouldn't suggest it be an adult's first experience with him. ( )
  jobinsonlis | May 11, 2021 |
I enjoyed Terry's revision of his 1971 novel The Carpet People. The book challenges the reader to imagine a world full of tribes within the scope of a carpet, challenging I say because despite all the familiar aspects of what it might be like to be minute and living deep in the hairs, the tribes grow vegetables and fruit from dust, ride horses and other animals, make campfires and forge weapons. The world of the Carpet is full of kingdoms and peoples, with the perilous Fray hovering (or hoovering) above them at all times. The story entails an uprising of the mouls and snargs who lurk in the underlay as the various tribes and kingdoms of the Carpet find unity in defeating the threat which has arrived to overcome them. However the Carpet People is about more than just warring peoples, it concerns the transitory nature of empires, the evolution of technology in an environment of found-objects, and most importantly the hypertextual characteristic of storytelling with an emphasis on outcomes. What I like about it as a contrast to Terry's other work is that in a little under three hundred pages Terry gives us a complete world, a complete history with complete saga to go with it. The humour is less contrived than what I've noticed in some of his other books. Terry himself has said that he felt sometimes he was writing a string of jokes with narrative in between, I thought the Carpet People, although brimming with buffoonish mirth dispersed the gags wisely throughout without it soaking up the storyline. ( )
  RupertOwen | Apr 27, 2021 |
I had originally asked for the 2015 re-release, but the shopkeeper ordered the 2012 one. Oh well, it's the story that matters, of course. :-)

'The Carpet People' was written by Mr. Pratchett back in the seventies, but for the re-release he reworked it here and there; he confirms this in the foreword. And it's nice to know how the story came to be. Also, it's written in a very accessible manner, more for children. But make no mistake, adults can more than enjoy this wonderful piece of amusement as well.

It's about a carpet, the Carpet, a world on its own. It's inhabited by several sorts of peoples and creatures. Good and evil. The basis for the story is a political one: kings, emperors, power, the people, treachery, ... but also collaboration, comradeship, friendship and above all: fun, pleasure, entertainment, laughter. And lots of imagination. As another reader here wrote: you'll never look at carpets the same way again.

One could extract many quotes from this little book, not only funny ones, also those that have a deeper meaning. Quotes that could be applied to today's world and civilization.

As fun as his Discworld novels are, I can really (!) recommend 'The Carpet People'. No, seriously, read it! Now! You'll love it, I promise. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
Terry Pratchett's first book. Written when he was 17. It is the latest book I'm reading to my daughter, Lennon. She is loving it so far ... especially since she learned the word "pismire" this evening. ( )
  lynnbyrdcpa | Dec 7, 2020 |
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» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pratchett, Terryprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kirby, JoshCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ragusa, AngelaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wyatt, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Lyn, for then and now.
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They called themselves the Munrungs. It meant The People, or The True Human Beings
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This was originally published in 1971, but rewritten by the same author and republished in 1992. The two versions are not the same.
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The Munrungs cross the Carpet to find a new home after their village is destroyed by the powerful and mysterious natural force Fray.

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