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Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture…
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Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto (edition 2004)

by Chuck Klosterman (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,584811,733 (3.71)47
Over half a million copies sold! From the author of the highly acclaimed heavy metal memoir, Fargo Rock City, comes another hilarious and discerning take on massively popular culture--set in Chuck Klosterman's den and your own--covering everything from the effect of John Cusack flicks to the crucial role of breakfast cereal to the awesome power of the Dixie Chicks. Countless writers and artists have spoken for a generation, but no one has done it quite like Chuck Klosterman. With an exhaustive knowledge of popular culture and an almost effortless ability to spin brilliant prose out of unlikely subject matter, Klosterman attacks the entire spectrum of postmodern America: reality TV, Internet porn, Pamela Anderson, literary Jesus freaks, and the real difference between apples and oranges (of which there is none). And don't even get him started on his love life and the whole Harry-Met-Sally situation. Whether deconstructing Saved by the Bell episodes or the artistic legacy of Billy Joel, the symbolic importance of The Empire Strikes Back or the Celtics/Lakers rivalry, Chuck will make you think, he'll make you laugh, and he'll drive you insane--usually all at once. Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs is ostensibly about art, entertainment, infotainment, sports, politics, and kittens, but--really--it's about us. All of us. As Klosterman realizes late at night, in the moment before he falls asleep, "In and of itself, nothing really matters. What matters is that nothing is ever 'in and of itself.'" Read to believe.… (more)
Member:danisaur
Title:Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto
Authors:Chuck Klosterman (Author)
Info:Scribner (2004), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work details

Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman

  1. 10
    Pulphead: Essays by John Jeremiah Sullivan (MShock)
    MShock: Recommended for any Klosterman fan. I would describe Sullivan's writing as more literary and less humorous than Klosterman's, though just as insightful and entertaining. Like Klosterman, his essays run the gamut of popular culture: from Axl Rose to Hurrcane Katrina, to One Tree Hill.… (more)
  2. 00
    Zombie Spaceship Wasteland by Patton Oswalt (ann.elizabeth)
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» See also 47 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
very readable, self-absorbed trash. it made me chuckle a couple times, but mostly it was idiotic. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
This is my first reading of anything by Chuck Klosterman and for the most part I enjoyed it. He displays his vast knowledge of pop culture in ways that amuse, sometimes going for more laughs than others. Whatever he gloats over (Saved By The Bell, Mr. Kellogg, Axl Rose & more) he breaks down in inventive ways to reveal the mechanics of their power. My favorite essay involved his hanging out with a Gun’s N’ Roses cover band, pointing out the silliness of their dream but nicely managing never to make fun of it. Thankfully he admits to not being above the pull of pop culture otherwise the reader would have had the taste of a lie on their tongues essay after essay. I disagreed as much as I agreed with his conclusions but he made his points well enough that I could live with it. Personal tastes have to be lived with and can be as long as there is reciprocation. Sometimes the hipster veneer covers us all—that gloss of pretentious self importance composed of pop culture touchstones and being part of an advertisers favorite demographics—but it gets thinner the more you open your eyes. Youth and the misapplication of importance often go hand in hand. Some essays didn’t seem complete—specifically his take on breakfast cereals and his take on the Lakers/Celtics rivalry but on the whole the essays and their sharp introductions will provoke some laughs and thoughts. I’d be curious to read more…but I am not running out right this minute to find it. ( )
  KurtWombat | Sep 15, 2019 |
With the book “Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs” we are exposed to the wit and opinions of Chuck Klosterman. He has watched things and listened to things and he has opinions on all of those things. Some of these opinions make sense and I can understand, such as the ones where our relationships are being ruined by the ones we see on Television. However, there is another facet to all of this and that is that I don’t recognize a lot of the references. I grew up in the 1990s and while I watched cartoons and things when I was a child, I never really watched an episode of The Real World from MTV. For one, I never really cared about simulated reality or reality shows in general. I understand that this was the only way to get TV for a bit due to the Writer’s Strike that I had heard about, but I would then rather play a video game or something that has a plot behind it, even if that plot is something simple like Super Mario Brothers or The Legend of Zelda. For two, shows that had real, live people bored me when I was a child. Friends? I don’t know, didn’t really care all that much about that one. Seinfeld? Later on in life perhaps, but not when it was first airing. Home Improvement? I think he mentions this one in passing but didn’t wax poetic about it. I was more of a fan of the shows on Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. It was probably something about my age demographic.

This Chuck Klosterman is a bit older than me, having been in college when I was a mere stripling of four. This makes his opinions and values slightly different from mine. I feed at the trough of current events and pop culture but I don’t really like to. I only watch a few things on television, I listen to music that I tend to like and not expand my horizons. For instance, this man has a burning hatred for Coldplay. This is revealed in the first essay and he tells you all the reasons. This girl he liked at the time could have slept with him at the Waldorf-Astoria but chose instead to fly out to Portland to view the first American Live Showing of Coldplay. Klosterman also hates the fact that they just put melodramatic lyrics to simple chords, calling them an inferior version of Travis, which is an inferior version of Radiohead. On the other hand, I don’t really mind Coldplay. I don’t really have a strong opinion on any musical act or artist. This might make one wonder why I even took this book out in the first place. Let me tell you the reason then; I was attracted by the cover. It was plain and somewhat boring with the words being placed in seemingly random positions. Also, I believe I have another book by Klosterman, but I don’t remember which one it is.

In any case, the book is interesting, and I did somewhat enjoy it. I don’t think myself and Klosterman would agree on much or that we would have good conversations, but this book was somewhat entertaining. I mean, Klosterman muses on tons of things that are locked in a relative period. He speaks of a span of time from the early nineties to the initial part of the new millennium. Since this book was printed in 2003 I can understand that. Had I read it when it first came out, maybe I would have gone with his opinions and been swayed by them. I mean, heck, I enjoyed Atlas Shrugged for a while. So then, this book was okay. It speaks to a generation in a manner that is engaging, but it wasn’t for me. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
This book was great. Many of the reviewers need to a. Lighten up, and b. Stop trying to convince themselves that they aren't the very "hipsters" that they are scoffing at in their reviews. ( )
  kweber319 | May 13, 2019 |
Too many chapters in this book simply left me feeling irritated. I think this is because Chuck Klosterman writes in a style very close to my own internal voice. Couple that with the biting cynicism of the material, and it can't help but make me feel like I, too, am as dysfunctional as he.

The parts where it hit though, really hit hard. But books shouldn't leave you feeling angry every time you stop for the night. ( )
  pqfuller | Apr 21, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Chuck Klostermanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Plouhinec, Valérie LeTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Sol-ip-sism (sol' ip size' em), n. Philos. The theory that only the self exists or can be proved to exist.

-- The Random House College Dictionary,

Revised Edition
"I remember saying things, but I have no idea what was said. It was generally a friendly conversation.

-- Associated Press Reporter Jack Sullivan,

attempting to recount 3 A.M. exchange

we had at a dinner party and inadvertently

describing the past ten years of my life.
Dedication
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There are two ways to look at life. (Introduction)
No woman will ever satisfy me.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Over half a million copies sold! From the author of the highly acclaimed heavy metal memoir, Fargo Rock City, comes another hilarious and discerning take on massively popular culture--set in Chuck Klosterman's den and your own--covering everything from the effect of John Cusack flicks to the crucial role of breakfast cereal to the awesome power of the Dixie Chicks. Countless writers and artists have spoken for a generation, but no one has done it quite like Chuck Klosterman. With an exhaustive knowledge of popular culture and an almost effortless ability to spin brilliant prose out of unlikely subject matter, Klosterman attacks the entire spectrum of postmodern America: reality TV, Internet porn, Pamela Anderson, literary Jesus freaks, and the real difference between apples and oranges (of which there is none). And don't even get him started on his love life and the whole Harry-Met-Sally situation. Whether deconstructing Saved by the Bell episodes or the artistic legacy of Billy Joel, the symbolic importance of The Empire Strikes Back or the Celtics/Lakers rivalry, Chuck will make you think, he'll make you laugh, and he'll drive you insane--usually all at once. Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs is ostensibly about art, entertainment, infotainment, sports, politics, and kittens, but--really--it's about us. All of us. As Klosterman realizes late at night, in the moment before he falls asleep, "In and of itself, nothing really matters. What matters is that nothing is ever 'in and of itself.'" Read to believe.

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