HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Romans and Christians

by Dominic Janes

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None2,984,925 (3)None
Although Christianity began as a protest movement against the moral state of the people of Israel, it also started within a Roman province and was for centuries to develop within the context of the Roman Empire. The stereotype of cruel emperors and heroic martyrs is familiar (not least from films) but, as Dominic Janes shows in this stimulating and wide-ranging study, the relationship between Romans and Christians was not only more complex but continually evolving.The ignorance and incomprehension of Pontius Pilate was soon replaced by dislike and anger, as the Christian community grew. The refusal of these people to sacrifice to the emperor's divinity struck a blow at the heart of Roman authority. Decades of sporadic persecution followed before emperor Constantine I converted to Christianity. The Church was then showered by gifts and endowments. Great churches with splendid decorations sprang up across the Empire. The splendour of Roman art and architecture was now brilliantly employed by the Christian faith.The final period of the Roman Empire saw the decay of the grand monuments of the Roman state as its power crumbled away. Yet, during those turbulent years the Church was able to keep control of its power and splendour. From being the humble opponent of the grandeur of Rome, the Church became the vehicle for the preservation of classical magnificence through the art of its basilicas and baptisteries.This book explores the story of Romans and Christians across the Empire. Then it focuses on Britain and Gaul in the final years of the Roman Empire so as to explain the vital way in which the heritage of classical art and architecture was transmitted to the Middle Ages and thereby to our own times.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Although Christianity began as a protest movement against the moral state of the people of Israel, it also started within a Roman province and was for centuries to develop within the context of the Roman Empire. The stereotype of cruel emperors and heroic martyrs is familiar (not least from films) but, as Dominic Janes shows in this stimulating and wide-ranging study, the relationship between Romans and Christians was not only more complex but continually evolving.The ignorance and incomprehension of Pontius Pilate was soon replaced by dislike and anger, as the Christian community grew. The refusal of these people to sacrifice to the emperor's divinity struck a blow at the heart of Roman authority. Decades of sporadic persecution followed before emperor Constantine I converted to Christianity. The Church was then showered by gifts and endowments. Great churches with splendid decorations sprang up across the Empire. The splendour of Roman art and architecture was now brilliantly employed by the Christian faith.The final period of the Roman Empire saw the decay of the grand monuments of the Roman state as its power crumbled away. Yet, during those turbulent years the Church was able to keep control of its power and splendour. From being the humble opponent of the grandeur of Rome, the Church became the vehicle for the preservation of classical magnificence through the art of its basilicas and baptisteries.This book explores the story of Romans and Christians across the Empire. Then it focuses on Britain and Gaul in the final years of the Roman Empire so as to explain the vital way in which the heritage of classical art and architecture was transmitted to the Middle Ages and thereby to our own times.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 170,425,827 books! | Top bar: Always visible