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Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a…
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Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl (original 2012; edition 2011)

by Stacy Pershall

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17111137,157 (3.8)5
Stacy Pershall grew up depressed and too smart for her own good, a deeply strange girl in Prairie Grove, Arkansas (population 1,000), where the prevailing wisdom was that Jesus healed all. From her days as a thirteen-year-old Jesus freak, through a battle with anorexia and bulimia, her first manic episode at eighteen, and the eventual diagnosis of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, this spirited and at times mordantly funny memoir chronicles Pershall's journey through hell-several breakdowns and suicide attempts and her struggle with the mental health care system.… (more)
Member:Avonelle
Title:Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl
Authors:Stacy Pershall
Info:W. W. Norton & Company, Kindle Edition, 241 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

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Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl by Stacy Pershall (2012)

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Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Very open and honest memoir. Smart woman, though sometimes I'm like, hmm. Ok. Probably don't have the same life philosophy (never really cared much about other people and what they thought about me, which is both my problem and my blessing). Pershall focuses on mental health which is exactly what I was looking for. She's got bipolar and BPD, though. Thank god I just have depression instead, hahaaa. ( )
  Joanna.Oyzon | Apr 17, 2018 |
I think the title of this book is a bit misleading, although the author may view herself as such.

To me she is not strange at all, she is/was very ill and her behavior was a result of not getting treatment in time, chronic misdiagnosing by various psychiatrists and the ages she let go by without any psychotropic medication.

I can not really relate to her full body tatooing, but if it helps her, who am I to say ? ( )
  REINADECOPIAYPEGA | Jan 11, 2018 |
An incredibly brutal tale of one woman’s continuous experience with the life altering disease known as ‘bipolar disorder’. It is a roller coaster ride of mistakes and heart break that leads the reader on one hell of a journey; that forces the realness of mental illness onto the open pages of a book. The story is about a woman named Stacy Pershall and the readers are introduced to her through the eyes of a crazed child. The author describes what was going on inside the mind of an undiagnosed bipolar child and how she related to the world. The story continues to discuss her childhood and gradually ages her into adolescence and finally to adulthood. Continuous experiences are shared with the reader, which show how she managed to survive by the skin of her teeth and pure luck, while being undiagnosed. The author also provides symptoms of the disease and uses her own behavior as examples. She gives a personal inside experience of what happened to her when she was finally diagnosed and what the inside of a mental hospital was like. The author leaves little out and is brutally honest in her telling of her past experiences. By sharing her struggles, she has become an advocate for those that fight with this cruel disease.

I must say that this was a very difficult, but interesting book to read. As a parent to a recently diagnosed nine year old with bipolar disorder, I plan on learning as much as I can about the disease. Reading this book gave me both hope and fear. I had to take breaks at times when I read the book, due to the heart break that I felt by some of the author’s choices. I thought about my daughter and imagined her doing this. However, as the book progressed I watched the author grow as a person and saw how she was able to subdue her demons and manage her disease. That alone has given me the strength that I need to continue to fight another day. When I see stories such as this, I know that we are not alone. I am so happy that the author is well and am grateful that she published this book. It was well written and full of grit. It might not be for everyone, but it was what I needed right now in my life. ( )
  Jennifer35k | Apr 12, 2015 |
If you ever wanted to know what it feels like to be hyper-intelligent, artistic, super-sensitive and mentally ill . . . tough to read. Good to know. Reminds us to be more consciously loving of the people who are in our care. ( )
1 vote Micalhut | Aug 20, 2013 |
Ten years ago I was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. Since then, I have often been in and out of therapy. I've tried various techniques to regulate my moods. What worked best for me, however, were words. Words are important to me, and by reading and learning about BPD, I was able to articulate my feelings.

I've read many books on the subject, probably all of which were written by therapists. Some I stepped back in amazement from, asking how they knew so much about me. Others were clearly speculating how a Borderline feels and reacts, and were way off. I was excited to read Loud in the House of Myself because here was a book actually written by a Borderline. And, not surprisingly, Stacy Pershall knows my story.

Okay, so Pershall's life has been more extreme than mine. Compared to her, I'm a tame Borderline--my therapists always said I was "high functioning." But the base of her actions and feelings are nearly identical. If you want insight into what it means to have BPD, this is the book.

On top of her BPD, Pershall struggled with eating disorders. Though I have many extremist behaviors that mirror the author's bulimia and anorexia, I have never had an eating disorder, per se. Though I'm not as versed in this field, Pershall's descriptions were vivid and made this side of her illness extremely real for me.

When I first started this book, my one worry was that--given the marketing of the book and its target audience (largely, young girls it seems)--that Loud in the House of Myself would be juvenile and poorly written. Quickly, this fear receded. Pershall is intelligent and witty. She talks often about her love of literature and her reading list is impressive.

Loud in the House of Myself is a frightening book. It's scary to get in the head of someone who is often irrational, someone who is seemingly normal one moment, belligerent the next, someone who swings from a belief that they are divine to a knowledge that they are worse than nothing. It's scary, but it's what it means to be Borderline. For whatever it is worth, I attest for Pershall's accuracy on the subject. Loud in the House of Myself is largely what it means to have been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. ( )
  chrisblocker | Mar 30, 2013 |
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While working at a shop in Brooklyn, my tattoo artist Denise had an apprentice named Tasha.
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Stacy Pershall grew up depressed and too smart for her own good, a deeply strange girl in Prairie Grove, Arkansas (population 1,000), where the prevailing wisdom was that Jesus healed all. From her days as a thirteen-year-old Jesus freak, through a battle with anorexia and bulimia, her first manic episode at eighteen, and the eventual diagnosis of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, this spirited and at times mordantly funny memoir chronicles Pershall's journey through hell-several breakdowns and suicide attempts and her struggle with the mental health care system.

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Stacy Pershall is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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