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Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New… (2011)

by Peggy Orenstein

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8025022,181 (3.66)30
The author explores her own conflicting feelings as a mother as she protects her offspring and probes the roots and tendrils of the girlie-girl movement and concludes that parents who think through their values early on and set reasonable limits, encourage dialogue and skepticism, and are canny about the consumer culture can combat the 24/7 "media machine" aimed at girls and hold off the focus on beauty, materialism, and the color pink somewhat.… (more)
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» See also 30 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
Some interesting ideas but an article or series of articles would have been better. ( )
  Bookjoy144 | Mar 2, 2022 |
I had some high hopes for CINDERELLA ATE MY DAUGHTER. It had a catchy title and focused on something I have been wondering how to tackle. How am I going to protect my daughters AGAINST Cinderella?

Peggy offers a nice origin story of Disney Princesses. There are some great nuggets of information (like how pink was more of a boy color and blue the girl color earlier in the 20th century). I was expecting a vicious counter-attack on Disney. A rallying cry. It was much more of a balanced and ineffective shrug of the shoulders (or whatever is the opposite of a rallying cry).

At least I'm grateful for books like these to make us think about these things than just blindly following Disney Princess-mania. With not much guidance and it being outdated (wonder where the FROZEN movie would fit? 8th Graders don't use Facebook anymore), I guess it's up to me to defend my daughter against the girl wearing one glass slipper. ( )
  wellington299 | Feb 19, 2022 |
I wish I had read this six months ago because I would have made it part of my Pop Culture Studies curriculum. Orenstein explores the many facets of girl culture and how difficult it can be for mothers (I'm I'm adding in aunts, teachers, etc.) to help girls navigate that culture.

Most disturbing to me was Orenstein's revelation (something I think I knew but hadn't really articulated) that girls often do not really know what they want outside of "feeling pretty" or performing hyper-sexualized actions.

Loved this book, and will probably read it again and teach from it next year. ( )
  ms_rowse | Jan 1, 2022 |
This was full of examples that made me ponder aspects of this topic. It's an interesting one and well worth consideration. ( )
  JorgeousJotts | Dec 3, 2021 |
More like 3.5. The concerns and the research were valid and quite fascinating (respectively). But I really wanted a solution and there didn't seem to be one. Maybe there isn't one. But I was still disappointed. However, regardless of my expectations, Orenstein did a fine job. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
Orenstein skillfully integrates extensive research that demonstrates the pitfalls of "the girlie-girl culture's emphasis on beauty and play-sexiness," which can increase girls' vulnerability to depression, distorted body images and eating disorders, and sexual risks. It's the personal anecdotes, though, which are delivered with wry, self-deprecating, highly quotable humor, that offer the greatest invitation to parents to consider their daughters' worlds and how they can help to shape a healthier, soul-nurturing environment
added by sduff222 | editBooklist, Gillian Engberg (Jan 1, 2011)
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Peggy Orensteinprimary authorall editionscalculated
King, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ruoto, WilliamDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Bree, ChristineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Here is my dirty little secret: as a journalist, I have spent nearly two decades writing about girls, thinking about girls, talking about how girls should be raised.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Portions of this book appeared in altered form in The New York Times Magazine.
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The author explores her own conflicting feelings as a mother as she protects her offspring and probes the roots and tendrils of the girlie-girl movement and concludes that parents who think through their values early on and set reasonable limits, encourage dialogue and skepticism, and are canny about the consumer culture can combat the 24/7 "media machine" aimed at girls and hold off the focus on beauty, materialism, and the color pink somewhat.

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