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The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in…
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The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time (edition 2010)

by David L. Ulin (Author)

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3022053,249 (3.59)13
Member:framberg
Title:The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time
Authors:David L. Ulin (Author)
Info:Sasquatch Books (2010), 160 pages
Collections:Alpha list, Your library
Rating:****
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The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time by David L. Ulin

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Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
This version of The Lost Art of Reading by David L. Ulin is a revised edition previously published in 2010. It contains a new Introduction and Afterword reflecting important cultural and technological changes that have occurred over the past eight years. Ulin uses these updated sections to describe and bemoan current trends in the US in terms of freedom of speech, privacy concerns, censorship controversies, and race relations. He does not hesitate to excoriate the election results of 2016, making his political opinions pretty clear from the start when he describes: “…the racist rhetoric that runs, like excrement, from the President’s mouth.” It seems that Ulin could have written a separate book on that subject, especially given the fact that these parts of the book take up almost 25% of the total. The rest of The Lost Art of Reading contains some very personal anecdotes and broad assumptions based on seemingly only on his own experience. The author digresses into history and sports analogies, explaining that everything can be considered a “story” and is thus relevant to his discussion. Ulin relates his own dismay at discovering an uncharacteristic inability to maintain sustained attention and interest in his reading. He uses the frame of helping his son with a school assignment to demonstrate the younger generation’s lack of interest in traditional modes of reading. He notes that the Internet, with its sheer saturation effect and many distractions, has impeded people’s ability to concentrate on text as is required. He also seems skeptical of the value of e-readers and cites their limitations, although his observations are based on outdated technology from 2010. This new release of The Lost Art of Reading would have benefitted from a complete update throughout so advances in this area could have been considered. Ulin’s book is most interesting if approached more like an extended essay or personal memoir than a definitive text. Those seeking a research-based or global approach to current trends in reading would be better served by searching elsewhere. ( )
  jnmegan | Sep 9, 2018 |
Expanded from an LA Times article, Ulin ponders the effects of immediately gratifying technology on our reptilian brain and its recently developed ability to read. I think I copied out 2/3 of the book into my journal as fodder for my future article on technology, kids, reading and the library. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
Expanded from an LA Times article, Ulin ponders the effects of immediately gratifying technology on our reptilian brain and its recently developed ability to read. I think I copied out 2/3 of the book into my journal as fodder for my future article on technology, kids, reading and the library. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
Supe de esta obra gracias a un tuit del autor Joe Hill, en el cual señaló que era el mejor libro que había leído con respecto a ese tema. Confiando en sus palabras, decidí comprarlo.

Puedo resumir diciendo que el libro es una recopilación de ideas sobre el tema de la lectura, repleto de citas y los pensamientos consiguientes a esas citas. También el autor mezcla sus vivencias y sus experiencias, relaciones con algunos de sus familiares y conocidos; además de temas variados que rondan la idea central, temas como las redes sociales, tecnología, ciencia y medicina, política, deporte y más. Creo que podría decirse que es un tipo de monográfico un poco más (y mejor) elaborado.

Recomiendo este libro a todos los que aman de la lectura y a todos los que se inician en ese fantástico mundo. The Lost Art of Reading te enseñará muchas cosas, te pondrá a meditar y te motivará a leer más aún vivamos en tiempos de distracción. ( )
  JorgeLC | Apr 28, 2018 |
Waste of time. Had this book for a few years since it seemed so appealing. It never came out in paperback and so I decided to buy it anyway to read.

It's just one long meandering ramble about books that doesn't actually say anything or get any point across. The author talks a bit about his travels, collecting books, talking about books with his son, etc. Apparently it was originally an essay, but sheesh it's a terrible essay too. I have no idea what his goal was or what message he was trying to convey.

i had hoped there would be something with meaning to this book, but nope. It's not at all worth it. Skip it. ( )
  acciolibros | Feb 11, 2018 |
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[R]eading is, by its nature, a strategy for displacement, for pulling back from the circumstances of the present and immersing in the textures of a different life.

Lately, I've begun to think of this as the touchstone of a quiet revolution, an idea as insurrectionary, in its own sense, as those of Thomas Paine. Reading, after all, an act of resistance in a landscape of distraction, a matter of engagement in a society that seems to want nothing more than for us to disengage. [150]
Reading is an act of contemplation, perhaps the only act in which we allow ourselves to merge with the consciousness of another human being. [16]
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An expansion of the author's Los Angeles Times essay explores the personal and cultural importance of reading in today's increasingly digital age, blending commentary with memoir to explain how the act of reading promotes engagement and mental freedom.… (more)

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