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Jagannath: Stories by Karin Tidbeck
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Jagannath: Stories (edition 2012)

by Karin Tidbeck

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4062355,056 (4.21)26
A child is born in a tin can. A switchboard operator finds himself in hell. Three corpulent women float somewhere beyond time. Welcome to the weird world of Karin Tidbeck, the visionary Swedish author of literary sci-fi, speculative fiction, and mind-bending fantasy who has captivated readers around the world. Originally published by the tiny press Cheeky Frawg-the passion project of Ann and Jeff VanderMeer-Jagannath has been celebrated by readers and critics alike, with rave reviews from major outlets and support from lauded peers like China Mieville and even Ursula K. Le Guin herself. These are stories in which fairies haunt quiet towns, and an immortal being discovers the nature of time-stories in which anything is possible.… (more)
Member:psutto
Title:Jagannath: Stories
Authors:Karin Tidbeck
Info:Cheeky Frawg Books (2012), Paperback, 142 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:2013 challenge

Work Information

Jagannath by Karin Tidbeck

  1. 00
    The Inner City by Karen Heuler (Longshanks)
    Longshanks: Weird, slightly dark, occasionally wry and perceptive short stories that don't fall back on genre tropes.
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» See also 26 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
What critics called Tidbeck’s ‘straightforward style’ came across to me as a taste for appropriate detail in both character and landscape. Tidbeck gives magical realism a good name. Her pacing flickers throughout the book, as she establishes a pattern of irregular occurrence, physical abnormality, and then revelation at the end that becomes not quite predictable, but not entirely surprising after the first few. The completeness of her world creation reminded me of Sofia Samatar, and something about the shape of her first few characters reminded me of Tom Holt’s sense of humor. ( )
  et.carole | Jan 21, 2022 |
Collections can be hit and miss, but this collection of Tidbeck's speculative stories is everything a reader could want in such a collection--the tales are unique, fresh, and ripe with characters and concepts that will stick with a reader long past the book has been closed. Even the themes which come up repeatedly are treated in such unique and interesting ways that there's no repetition felt, and what's especially impressive is that the shorter stories in the collection are just as striking as the longer ones. Among the stand-outs in the collection for me were "Beatrice" and "Who is Arvid Pekon?", as well as "Rebecka"--and these are among some of the shorter stories in the collection, though I think I'll come back to read them repeatedly.

I'd absolutely recommend this collection to all lovers of speculative fiction, as these stories have the depth and freshness of the best high-concept novels out there in all of the best ways possible. I'm a fan of Tidbeck for life after reading Jagannath. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Aug 9, 2021 |
Jagannath is a collection of thirteen short stories by Swedish author, Karin Tidbeck. The stories are written in English, but have a distinct Nordic feel. Not very well known in the U.S., her writing style reminded me of Jonathan Carroll, whose genre might best be described as speculative fiction: a mixture of fantasy and folklore, with side orders of whimsy and weird. I'm not a big fan of short stories, but these ranged from 3-5 stars. Her afterword about the differences in writing between two languages was interesting as well. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Karin Tidbeck is a Swedish fiction writer who writes in both Swedish and English, and does her own translations in both directions. In her afterword, she talks about both the challenges and the benefits--the concepts that can't really be translated, the ones that can't quite be translated, but don't add anything but an extra stumble for the reader who doesn't speak that language, the insights you can get by coming at a language from the outside.

She also talks about the experience of reading all of H. P. Lovecraft's work, more or less nonstop.

The stories here vary a lot, but overall have a touch of the surreal, as well as a perspective that's less familiar than that of writers who grew up in the English-speaking world. We see in this collection the impostor creature the pyret, and the vittra, a Scandinavian variety of the fae. We also meet intelligent machines that form close relationships with humans who care for them, and a far-future mechanical ark on a damaged Earth. There's variety, compelling characters, and fascinating stories, here,

Highly recommended.

I bought this audiobook. ( )
  LisCarey | Oct 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
It’s a slim volume, and some of the stories are only a few pages long, but it’s not quite like anything you’ve seen, even though you may hear vague echoes of everyone from Kafka to Borges to Tove Jansson.
added by karenb | editLocus, Gary K. Wolfe (Nov 14, 2012)
 
For you, dear reader, something wonderful — and weird — is going to happen if you open this book.

It's waiting for you.
added by karenb | editNPR, Alan Cheuse (Oct 31, 2012)
 
By turns brilliant and indecipherably cryptic, this book will capture the imaginations of fans of experimental fantasy and science fiction and is a fine launch for Cheeky Frawg, a new press dedicated to international and translated fiction.
added by karenb | editPublishers Weekly (Sep 24, 2012)
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Karin Tidbeckprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hand, ElizabethIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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A child is born in a tin can. A switchboard operator finds himself in hell. Three corpulent women float somewhere beyond time. Welcome to the weird world of Karin Tidbeck, the visionary Swedish author of literary sci-fi, speculative fiction, and mind-bending fantasy who has captivated readers around the world. Originally published by the tiny press Cheeky Frawg-the passion project of Ann and Jeff VanderMeer-Jagannath has been celebrated by readers and critics alike, with rave reviews from major outlets and support from lauded peers like China Mieville and even Ursula K. Le Guin herself. These are stories in which fairies haunt quiet towns, and an immortal being discovers the nature of time-stories in which anything is possible.

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A collection of fantastical short stories by Swedish author Karin Tidbeck.
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