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Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A…
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Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Miran Lipovaca

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284577,176 (4)1
It's all in the name: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! is a hilarious, illustrated guide to this complex functional language. Packed with the author's original artwork, pop culture references, and most importantly, useful example code, this book teaches functional fundamentals in a way you never thought possible. You'll start with the kid stuff: basic syntax, recursion, types and type classes. Then once you've got the basics down, the real black belt master-class begins: you'll learn to use applicative functors, monads, zippers, and all the other mythical Haskell constructs you've only read about in storybooks. As you work your way through the author's imaginative (and occasionally insane) examples, you'll learn to: Laugh in the face of side effects as you wield purely functional programming techniques Use the magic of Haskell's 'laziness' to play with infinite sets of data Organize your programs by creating your own types, type classes, and modules Use Haskell's elegant input/… (more)
Member:cedricbonhomme
Title:Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide
Authors:Miran Lipovaca
Info:No Starch Press (2011), Edition: 1, Paperback, 400 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:computer science, cs_lang:haskell, ghc, functional programming, programming

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Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide by Miran Lipovača (2011)

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Showing 5 of 5
This is a re-read, although it's a been a few years. Actually, those years seem to have rather helped. Last time I around, I was reading through and everything made a lot of sense (I have a strong background in functional programming, so it wasn't new here). And then I hit monads and side effects and everything went bizarre.

This time around? Well, everything still went sideways, but in a way that made sense?


moveKnight :: KnightPos -> [KnightPos]
moveKnight (c,r) = do
⠀⠀⠀⠀(c',r') ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀,(c 1,r-2),(c 1,r 2),(c-1,r-2),(c-1,r 2)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀]
⠀⠀⠀⠀guard (c' `elem` [1..8] && r' `elem` [1..8])
⠀⠀⠀⠀return (c',r')


Sure.

In any case, if you're into programming, particularly functional programming, you should give Haskell a chance. It probably won't become your default goto language, but it might just give you a new way to think, which is always worthwhile. And [b:Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!|6593810|Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!|Miran Lipovača|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1294497489l/6593810._SX50_.jpg|6787531] is a great way to do that. It's well written and funny, bringing you through at least enough of the language to decide just how much more you want to dive in.

I think the primary thing missing is any solid, practical real world examples. Mathematical tricks and trivial problems are all well and good, but if that's all you can write in a language, you're not going to be doing much with it.

Still worth a read. ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
This book's opening chapters are poorly organized for actually teaching the language and programming paradigm. It basically seems a bit more like kindergarten show-and-tell than a book about programming, without any significant approach to meaningful principles of Haskell or functional programming. I did not find it worth my time at all, and quickly switched to reading a different Haskell book.

I recommend Graham Hutton's Programming In Haskell. It's much better. ( )
  apotheon | Dec 14, 2020 |
Haskell reinvigorated my love for programming, lifting it up a meta-level and forcing me to reevaluate the way I look at the world. ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
This provided a very clear overview of Haskell, but Haskell seems far too academic for me to use in real-world programming. I got out of the book what I needed to understand for the Haskell assignments in my Master's program. ( )
  sbloom42 | May 21, 2014 |
Technically I'm still reading this (I've skimmed the last 4 chapters or so, but keep going back to review them more closely). That said, I don't hesitate to say that anyone planning to learn Haskell absolutely must start with this book. It easily provides the most direct and clear explanations I've seen for both Haskell and functional programming in general. ( )
  tlockney | Feb 5, 2012 |
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It's all in the name: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! is a hilarious, illustrated guide to this complex functional language. Packed with the author's original artwork, pop culture references, and most importantly, useful example code, this book teaches functional fundamentals in a way you never thought possible. You'll start with the kid stuff: basic syntax, recursion, types and type classes. Then once you've got the basics down, the real black belt master-class begins: you'll learn to use applicative functors, monads, zippers, and all the other mythical Haskell constructs you've only read about in storybooks. As you work your way through the author's imaginative (and occasionally insane) examples, you'll learn to: Laugh in the face of side effects as you wield purely functional programming techniques Use the magic of Haskell's 'laziness' to play with infinite sets of data Organize your programs by creating your own types, type classes, and modules Use Haskell's elegant input/

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