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The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street,…
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The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street, No. 1) (edition 2005)

by Debbie Macomber

Series: Blossom Street (1)

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1,961636,842 (3.68)79
There's a little yarn shop on Blossom Street in Seattle. It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love. Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is "How To Make a Baby Blanket." Three women join. Jacqueline Donovan wants to knit something for her grandchild as a gesture of reconciliation with her daughter-in-law. Carol Girard feels that the baby blanket is a message of hope as she makes a final attempt to conceive. And Alix Townsend is knitting her blanket for a court-ordered community service project. These four very different women, brought together by an age-old craft, make unexpected discoveries--about themselves and each other. Discoveries that lead to friendship and more.… (more)
Member:MKateQuinn
Title:The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street, No. 1)
Authors:Debbie Macomber
Info:Mira (2005), Edition: 1st THUS, Mass Market Paperback, 416 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Shop on Blossom Street by Debbie Macomber

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English (62)  Italian (1)  All languages (63)
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
There's a little yarn store in Seattle.It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love…

Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is "How to Make a Baby Blanket." Three women join: Jacqueline Donovan wants to knit something for her grandchild as a gesture of reconciliation with her daughter-in-law; Carol Girard feels that the baby blanket is a message of hope as she makes a final attempt to conceive; Alix Townsend is knitting her blanket for a court-ordered community service project.

These four very different women, brought together by an age-old craft, make unexpected discoveries—about themselves and each other. Discoveries that lead to friendship and more


First of the Blossom Street series from Macomber. These are not exactly taxing books, and this is the running of the new Yarn shop on Blosson Street, which is undergoing a rebuild and investment.

Lydia is recovering from Cancer, and is suffering from loss - of her father, her confidence etc. She starts a knitting class, and starts to make friends, with her customers, her sister and the local delivery man.

These are a little formulaic, and are best read as "fluff" books that are not very challenging, but a pleasant way to spend a day or so. It sets up the Blossom Street story community, which Macomber has successfully spread into several different communities ( )
  nordie | Apr 18, 2022 |
Gender stereotypes, ahoy! Seriously, I think if you can turn off the part of your brain that goes "well, not all women would want that.." I think it would be enjoyable enough of a read, but I just couldn't. ( )
1 vote Jthierer | Apr 5, 2021 |
This is the story of four women: Lydia, a cancer survivor who opens a yarn store, and her first three customers/students, Jacqueline, a society matron, Carol, a business woman trying to get pregnant, and wild-child Alix. The book takes us through their lives and how being in a knitting group together changes them.

This was, by far, the most predictable, formulaic book I've ever read. As soon as every woman's story, and those of supporting characters, was laid out, I knew exactly what was going to happen with each main character, and, sadly, I was right.

It's a fine story if you're looking for a comfortable, female-centric feel-good novel. But don't come to this looking for any depth. It's very simply a light, happily-ever-after.

As a yarn-crafter, and member of my own crafting group, I wanted to love this book. I'm a little sad that I didn't. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
Needed a fix after finishing Rose Harbor series. This is another sweet series by Debbie Macomber. ( )
  xKayx | Dec 14, 2020 |
You know when you start the book that all will find happy endings but makes the book almost too sweet. Liked that this group of unique individuals finds friendship at a yarn shop. Jacqueline's dislike of her daughter-in-law was horrid. Understood the fear that Lydia had in developing a boy relationship. Surprised at who Alix got involved with because it seemed a stretch to be a minister type. ( )
  kshydog | Dec 13, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
The religious overtones of Macomber's novel may throw some readers, but the author should attract her usual sizeable readership and pick up some fans of Chiaverini's Elm Creek Quilts series.
added by Christa_Josh | editPublishers Weekly (Apr 26, 2004)
 
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The first time I saw the empty store on Blossom Street, I thought of my father.
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There's a little yarn shop on Blossom Street in Seattle. It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love. Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is "How To Make a Baby Blanket." Three women join. Jacqueline Donovan wants to knit something for her grandchild as a gesture of reconciliation with her daughter-in-law. Carol Girard feels that the baby blanket is a message of hope as she makes a final attempt to conceive. And Alix Townsend is knitting her blanket for a court-ordered community service project. These four very different women, brought together by an age-old craft, make unexpected discoveries--about themselves and each other. Discoveries that lead to friendship and more.

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