HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Being, Nature, and Life in Aristotle: Essays in Honor of Allan Gotthelf

by James G. Lennox (Editor), Robert Bolton (Editor)

Other authors: Sarah Broadie (Contributor), David Charles (Contributor), Alan Code (Contributor), John M. Cooper (Contributor), Mary Louise Gill (Contributor)3 more, Aryeh Kosman (Contributor), Pierre Pellegrin (Contributor), David Sedley (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
711,942,762 (5)None
This volume of essays explores major connected themes in Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of nature, and ethics, especially themes related to essence, definition, teleology, activity, potentiality, and the highest good. The volume is united by the belief that all aspects of Aristotle's work need to be studied together if any one of the areas of thought is to be fully understood. Many of the papers were contributions to a conference at the University of Pittsburgh entitled 'Being, Nature, and Life in Aristotle', to honor Professor Allan Gotthelf's many contributions to the field of ancient philosophy; a few are contributions from those who were invited but could not attend. The contributors, all longstanding friends of Professor Gotthelf, are among the most accomplished scholars in the field of ancient philosophy today.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Dr. Lennox has put together a worthy collection of essays in honor of Dr. Gotthelf. Especially interesting is a common thread running through the various lines of research of how we need to understand Aristotle's teleology in order to understand not only his ethics and politics, but also his metaphysics, biology, and methodology. ( )
  AshRyan | Jan 23, 2012 |
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lennox, James G.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bolton, RobertEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Broadie, SarahContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Charles, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Code, AlanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cooper, John M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gill, Mary LouiseContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kosman, AryehContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pellegrin, PierreContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sedley, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

This volume of essays explores major connected themes in Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of nature, and ethics, especially themes related to essence, definition, teleology, activity, potentiality, and the highest good. The volume is united by the belief that all aspects of Aristotle's work need to be studied together if any one of the areas of thought is to be fully understood. Many of the papers were contributions to a conference at the University of Pittsburgh entitled 'Being, Nature, and Life in Aristotle', to honor Professor Allan Gotthelf's many contributions to the field of ancient philosophy; a few are contributions from those who were invited but could not attend. The contributors, all longstanding friends of Professor Gotthelf, are among the most accomplished scholars in the field of ancient philosophy today.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,609,612 books! | Top bar: Always visible