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The Sweetness of Tears

by Nafisa Haji

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14121150,010 (4.06)4
"Jo March--family member of an Evangelical Christian Dynasty and early questioner of her own faith--knows that there is something she is not being told about her own past. She intends to find out. Told from multiple generational and cultural viewpoints, The Sweetness of Tears skillfully interweaves the lives and stories of Jo's relatives, many of whom she never knew existed. She travels from California to Chicago, Pakistan to Iraq, chasing loose threads that she hopes will lead to the truth and understanding of her own beginnings that she so craves. As Jo begins to discover who she is, what she learns above all else is that nothing is ever as it seems, and those with the strongest faith, are those who once doubted it the most. "--… (more)
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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
This book should have a "5" star rating, except the first ~30 pages or so seemed to drag on; luckily once I was used to the style the book was written it didn't seem as slow. And the ending was anti-climatic, this is probably a little bit of a spoiler, but I feel like the last few chapters were building towards this certain moment, and then it never came.

Aside from those two points, this book was amazing! I loved the characters Nafisa Haji created and the rich and complex stories they had. There were a few very emotional moments that were so believable I teared up (well not a shocker, really).

Something else Haji did well was the weaving of several Christian and Muslim views and ideas into the story. Some books that talk about one religion feel preachy, and those that talk about two different ones can also feel arrogant towards one or the other, but this book was neither.

Definitely a must-read! ( )
  twileteyes | Feb 4, 2016 |
This was an early review book from LibraryThing. I'm not typically a fan of books with multiple POVs, but I really enjoyed this book. I loved how the characters' different stories intertwined. The characters and their stories were developed so well that I felt connected to them as I read. I couldn't put it down! Finished the book in only 3 days! ( )
  Anietzerck | Dec 27, 2014 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This was an early review book from LibraryThing. I'm not typically a fan of books with multiple POVs, but I really enjoyed this book. I loved how the characters' different stories intertwined. The characters and their stories were developed so well that I felt connected to them as I read. I couldn't put it down! Finished the book in only 3 days! ( )
  Anietzerck | Dec 9, 2014 |
The ultimate compliment: I wish I could write as the author does. This is an amazingly compelling and engaging story. Haji has shared a precious gift, a many-fold one: a lesson in recent history, empathy of several perspectives, characters that are well-rounded and that I'd want to meet, and an overarching story that sings gloriously. The theme and the tone (from any of the several perspectives) are uplifting. This is a book that I joyfully recommend. ( )
  ming.l | Mar 31, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
Somewhere in all of this is a family story, and the many threads eventually cleave to illustrate how a complicated blend of race, religion, culture, and tradition can create peace rather than conflict.
 
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"Jo March--family member of an Evangelical Christian Dynasty and early questioner of her own faith--knows that there is something she is not being told about her own past. She intends to find out. Told from multiple generational and cultural viewpoints, The Sweetness of Tears skillfully interweaves the lives and stories of Jo's relatives, many of whom she never knew existed. She travels from California to Chicago, Pakistan to Iraq, chasing loose threads that she hopes will lead to the truth and understanding of her own beginnings that she so craves. As Jo begins to discover who she is, what she learns above all else is that nothing is ever as it seems, and those with the strongest faith, are those who once doubted it the most. "--

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