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The Dangerous Book for Boys by Conn Iggulden
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The Dangerous Book for Boys (original 2007; edition 2007)

by Conn Iggulden, Hal Iggulden

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,496492,787 (4.01)64
For every boy from eight to eighty, covers essential boyhood skills such as building tree houses, learning how to fish, finding true north, and even answering the age-old question of what the big deal with girls is. In this digital age there is still a place for knots, skimming stones and stories of incredible courage. This book recaptures Sunday afternoons, stimulates curiosity, and makes for great father-son activities. The brothers Conn and Hal have put together a collection of all things that make being young, or young at heart, fun--building go-carts and electromagnets, identifying insects and spiders, and flying the world's best paper airplanes.--From publisher description.… (more)
Member:PeterPhillips
Title:The Dangerous Book for Boys
Authors:Conn Iggulden
Other authors:Hal Iggulden
Info:William Morrow (2007), Edition: First American Edition, Hardcover, 270 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

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The Dangerous Book for Boys by Conn Iggulden (2007)

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» See also 64 mentions

English (48)  German (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
For every boy from 8 to 80, covers the essential boyhood skills such as building tree houses, learning how to fish, finding true north, and even answering the age-old question of what the big deal with girls is.
  BLTSbraille | Sep 12, 2021 |
I can see where this book could appeal to boys, if not for the fact that so many of them are tethered to their game consoles and thus unable to enjoy it. But this is a good book to give to boys and send them outside to do things. It also has a lot of good trivia, poems, historical events, allusions, so on that boys (and just any educated person) should know. I would have enjoyed this book as a boy. Nowadays, I think it is more a book to browse at leisure rather than read straight through, which is what I ended up doing. Personally, I found it a little reminiscent of the Boy Scout Handbook I had when I was a scout (though the scout book had much better illustrations). It is also reminiscent of older manuals, which I am sure is intentional. There is a bit of everything here, and I think anyone can learn something, or maybe remember something they learned as a child. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
[Read this years ago. This randomly popped into my head, but I don't remember my rating.]
  DestDest | Apr 27, 2020 |
A book every boy should read, also every girl, no matter the age. Learn how to make a paper plane, a go-cart, a tree house. Learn the morse code and read about the biggest battles of all time. Contains important life wisdom too without moralizing. A bit American-centric, this edition. ( )
  matija2019 | Jan 8, 2019 |
This book is about all boys as they growing up learning what boys are doing and expected to do. I like it because it give different perspective of different gender role. Will use it on my class to ask my students who learning doing thing as they grow up. It suitable for grade 7 and up.
  HsaRay | May 4, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
Like a bright lad with a chemistry set, “The Dangerous Book” generates a reaction with a smart mix: one part conservative polemic and one part simple-pleasures fable. It’s a rejection of the namby-pamby parenting of the 1970s. In its place, the authors evoke a peculiar, if fun, British Empire boyhood, one in which sturdy boys are expected to strive to “conquer worlds.” The book sells its thrills hard, and it certainly made this reader swoon at the idea of a son who recites “Ozymandias” and knows celestial navigation.
 
From the Publisher

The bestselling book for every boy from eight to eighty, covering essential boyhood skills such as building tree houses, learning how to fish, finding true north, and even answering the age old question of what the big deal with girls is.

In this digital age there is still a place for knots, skimming stones and stories of incredible courage. This book recaptures Sunday afternoons, stimulates curiosity, and makes for great father-son activities. The brothers Conn and Hal have put together a wonderful collection of all things that make being young or young at heart fun---building go-carts and electromagnets, identifying insects and spiders, and flying the world's best paper airplanes.

The completely revised American Edition includes:

The Greatest Paper Aiplane in the World
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
The Five Knots Every Boy Should Know
Stickball
Slingshots
Fossils
Building a Treehouse
Making a Bow and Arrow
Fishing (revised with US Fish)
Timers and Tripwires
Baseball's "Most Valuable Players"
Famous Battles-Including Lexington and Concord, The Alamo, and Gettysburg
Spies-Codes and Ciphers
Making a Go-Cart
Navajo Code Talkers' Dictionary
Girls
Cloud Formations
The States of the U.S.
Mountains of the U.S.
Navigation
The Declaration of Independence
Skimming Stones
Making a Periscope
The Ten Commandments
Common US Trees
Timeline of American History
added by sriches | editPublisher's Review
 
Gr 4-8 - Intentionally old-fashioned and politically incorrect, this eclectic collection addresses the undeniable boy-appeal of certain facts and activities. Dozens of short chapters, in fairly random order, cover a wide range of topics in conversational prose. Simple instructions for coin tricks and paper airplanes alternate with excerpts from history such as "Famous Battles" and facts about ancient wonders of the world and astronomy. The "dangerous" aspect is more apparent in such chapters as "Making Cloth Fireproof," and "Hunting and Cooking a Rabbit," but also applies to the overall premise that action is fun and can be worth the risks. A section on stickball, for instance, includes advice to possibly "flee the vicinity" in the event of a broken window. The information is appropriately concise. The knot-tying section, for example, sticks to five basic varieties with clear instructions and useful diagrams. Occasional topics such as "Marbling Paper" and "Latin Phrases Every Boy Should Know" may not fit the stereotypical interests of young males, but support the general theme of cultivating curiosity. The authors refer to their own experiences as they tested the activities, lending an appealing personal tone. Tongue-in-cheek humor emerges throughout, notably in eight bits of advice offered in the chapter called "Girls." Already a best seller in England, this American edition features several adjustments, such as substituting "The Declaration of Independence" for "Patron Saints of Britain." Both premise and content should appeal to many boys, and might be even more successful when nostalgic dads join in.-Steven Engelfried, Multnomah County Library, OR
Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

added by sriches | editLibrary Journal, Reed Business Information
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Conn Igguldenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Iggulden, Halmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Don't worry about genius and don't worry about not being clever. Trust rather to hard work, perseverance, and determination. The best motto for a long march is "Don't grumble. Plug on."
You hold your future in your own hands. Never waver in this belief. Don't swagger. The boy who swaggers - like the man who swaggers - has little else that he can do. He is a cheap-Jack crying his own paltry wares. It is the empty tin that rattles most. Be honest. Be loyal. Be kind. Remember that the hardest thing to acquire is the faculty of being unselfish. As a quality it is one of the finest attributes of manliness.
Love the sea. the ringing beach and the open downs.
Keep clean, body and mind.
--Sir Frederick Treves...to HM the King...September 2, 1903
Dedication
To all of those people who said "You have to include..."
until we had to avoid telling anyone else about the book
for fear of the extra chapters. Particular thanks to Bernard
Cornwell, whose advice helped us through a difficult time and
Paul D'Urso, a good father and a good friend.
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In this age of video games and cell phones, there must still be a place for knots, tree houses, and stories of incredible courage.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please DO NOT combine with any of the Pocket versions of Dangerous Books for Boys.
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For every boy from eight to eighty, covers essential boyhood skills such as building tree houses, learning how to fish, finding true north, and even answering the age-old question of what the big deal with girls is. In this digital age there is still a place for knots, skimming stones and stories of incredible courage. This book recaptures Sunday afternoons, stimulates curiosity, and makes for great father-son activities. The brothers Conn and Hal have put together a collection of all things that make being young, or young at heart, fun--building go-carts and electromagnets, identifying insects and spiders, and flying the world's best paper airplanes.--From publisher description.

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