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The Late American Novel: Writers on the Future of Books

by Jeff Martin, C. Max Magee (Editor)

Other authors: Thomas Allen (Contributor), Kyle Beachy (Contributor), John Brandon (Contributor), Sonya Chung (Contributor), Elizabeth Crane (Contributor)22 more, Rudolph Delson (Contributor), Rivka Galchen (Contributor), David Gates (Contributor), Joshua Gaylord (Contributor), Lauren Groff (Contributor), Garth Risk Hallberg (Contributor), Nancy Jo Sales (Contributor), Owen King (Contributor), Benjamin Kunkel (Contributor), Reif Larsen (Contributor), Victor LaValle (Contributor), Jonathan Lethem (Contributor), Ander Manson (Contributor), Clancy Martin (Contributor), Joe Meno (Contributor), Deb Olin Unferth (Contributor), Victoria Patterson (Contributor), Michael Paul Mason (Contributor), Tom Piazza (Contributor), Marco Roth (Contributor), Emily St. John Mandel (Contributor), Katharine Taylor (Contributor)

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642411,021 (3.75)None
The way we absorb information has changed dramatically. Edison's phonograph has been reincarnated as the iPod. Celluloid went digital. But books, for the most part, have remained the same--until now. And while music and movies have undergone an almost Darwinian evolution, the literary world now faces a revolution, a sudden change in the way we buy, produce, and read books. Scholars, journalists, and publishers have turned their brains inside out in the effort to predict what lies ahead, but who better to comment on the future of the book than those who are driven to write them? InThe Late American Novel, Jeff Martin and C. Max Magee gather some of today's finest writers to consider the sea change that is upon them. Lauren Groff imagines an array of fantastical futures for writers, from poets with groupies to novelists as vending machines. Rivka Galchen writes about the figurative and literal death of paper. Joe Meno expounds upon the idea of a book as a place set permanently aside for the imagination, regardless of format. These and other original essays by Reif Larsen, Benjamin Kunkel, Victoria Patterson, and many more provide a timely and much-needed commentary on this compelling cultural crossroad.… (more)
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ugh. only a few essays shine here, the rest is wannabe DFW, forced-cleverness and irony that masks their inability to say anything of consequence about the future of the book. ( )
  pessoanongrata | Mar 30, 2013 |
Saw this mentioned by the editor here: http://www.themillions.com/2011/01/late-american-novel-fans.htmlLoved this book. A collection of essays from various writers about the future of writing, reading, and the hallowed book itself. Some were funny, some were moody, some were fantasy and nostalgia combined. I enjoyed something from each of them, and found a lot to think about, as well as breadcrumb trails into other books that are now added to my "to read" list. I also enjoyed the irony of reading this book (that compares paper novels to iPad equivalents) as an ebook in the Kindle app on my iPad, while hoping to get a paper copy to "keep" someday. The last essay had some images with the text that would probably have worked better on paper. I would love to read these essays again a year from now to see how these musings on a present future sound by then. ( )
1 vote esquetee | Nov 22, 2011 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeff Martinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Magee, C. MaxEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, ThomasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Beachy, KyleContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brandon, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chung, SonyaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Crane, ElizabethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Delson, RudolphContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Galchen, RivkaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gates, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gaylord, JoshuaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Groff, LaurenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hallberg, Garth RiskContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jo Sales, NancyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
King, OwenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kunkel, BenjaminContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Larsen, ReifContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
LaValle, VictorContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lethem, JonathanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Manson, AnderContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Martin, ClancyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Meno, JoeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Olin Unferth, DebContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Patterson, VictoriaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Paul Mason, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Piazza, TomContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Roth, MarcoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
St. John Mandel, EmilyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Taylor, KatharineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The way we absorb information has changed dramatically. Edison's phonograph has been reincarnated as the iPod. Celluloid went digital. But books, for the most part, have remained the same--until now. And while music and movies have undergone an almost Darwinian evolution, the literary world now faces a revolution, a sudden change in the way we buy, produce, and read books. Scholars, journalists, and publishers have turned their brains inside out in the effort to predict what lies ahead, but who better to comment on the future of the book than those who are driven to write them? InThe Late American Novel, Jeff Martin and C. Max Magee gather some of today's finest writers to consider the sea change that is upon them. Lauren Groff imagines an array of fantastical futures for writers, from poets with groupies to novelists as vending machines. Rivka Galchen writes about the figurative and literal death of paper. Joe Meno expounds upon the idea of a book as a place set permanently aside for the imagination, regardless of format. These and other original essays by Reif Larsen, Benjamin Kunkel, Victoria Patterson, and many more provide a timely and much-needed commentary on this compelling cultural crossroad.

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