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Attachments

by Rainbow Rowell

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2,2351954,923 (3.97)132
Beth and Jennifer know their company monitors their office e-mail, but they still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers at the newspaper and baring their personal lives like an open book. When Lincoln applied to be an Internet security officer, he hardly imagined he'd be sifting through other people's inboxes like some sort of electronic Peeping Tom. Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help but be entertained and captivated by their stories. But by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. After a series of close encounters and missed connections, Lincoln decides it's time to muster the courage to follow his heart, even if he can't see exactly where it's leading him. This story is about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself, even it is someone you have never met.… (more)
Recently added byCarrieWuj, Cindy-nester, margaretkwon, Arina40, private library, coffeebarista, ashezbookz
  1. 41
    Boy Meets Girl by Meg Cabot (kathleen.morrow)
    kathleen.morrow: Similar humor and writing. In both stories, 2 female friends exchange witty, funny emails.
  2. 10
    The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion (foggidawn)
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    Mister Romance by Leisa Rayven (fueledbycoffee)
    fueledbycoffee: Slow burn, good writing
  4. 00
    Jemima J by Jane Green (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: cyber romance and falling in love over email, witty women.
  5. 00
    Love Virtually by Daniel Glattauer (Anonymous user)
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English (192)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (195)
Showing 1-5 of 192 (next | show all)
3.5 The primary story vehicle here is emails written between Jennifer and Beth, co-workers at a newspaper in Nebraska on the eve of the millennium. It feels charmingly antiquated. The newspaper has recently gone digital and needs to employ some tech power too, which is where Lincoln comes in. He has been hired to be internet security and monitor employees' use of the internet and email. He reads through anything the WebFence flags as inappropriate, issues warnings and hopes for a change in behavior. Jennifer and Beth's emails get flagged frequently, but more because of frank exchange of friendship info than any inappropriate behavior. For example, Jennifer becomes pregnant and "uterus" and "breast" are the words that flag their correspondence. The women do not know Lincoln reads their mail and he works overnight, so rarely has opportunity to encounter them in person. He begins to enjoy their funny frank friendship and emails so never censors them, but runs into some ethical quicksand when he begins to have feelings for Beth (though not having met her!) and learns of her rocky relationship with moody musician live-in boyfriend Chris. Meanwhile Beth sees Lincoln one night in the break room and begins to crush on him, without knowing who he is or what his (snoopy) role is. Other side plots include Lincoln getting over a devastating high school/college romance, living at home with his mother, and being accountable to his sister Eve; Jennifer's marriage, Beth's lack of one, and other 20s/30s topics. This has one foot out of YA because what teen would want to read about boring real life stuff? -- but the issues are right on and evoke memories of that life-span that seem far too distant now :(. Rowell does romance so well -- it is sweet and funny and touching and just the way you want finding "the one" to be with all the right words and scenarios. Sigh. A perfect escape/flashback. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
My first comment when I finished this book "well that was different" - I dont know why I always feel that way after reading a Rowell book, and none will ever compare to Eleanor and Park for me so none will get 5 stars but this book was kind of adorable. It was also kind of stalkerish and I feel like I should have more issues with that then I did - I mean talk about awkward. It technically all made sense in the end but I was like, wow, this is too much sometimes - ah well, can't win em all ( )
  ashezbookz | Oct 20, 2020 |
This and over 100 other reviews can be found on my blog Rachel Reading. Come check it out!

This book was our first book back after our book club hiatus, and I was glad it was something that was really readable. I don't mind sitting through books I don't like as long as they're readable (see [b:Will Grayson Will Grayson|6567017|Will Grayson, Will Grayson|John Green|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1368393890s/6567017.jpg|6759965]), but I will say I had pretty high expectations for this book. One of my closest friends whose book recommendations I trust more than anything LOVES Rainbow Rowell, and has even said that Rowell is now her favorite author over John Green (which is saying something!) and while this book was pretty adorable, I expected more. I liked the characters, and absolutely adored the email format, and watching the friendship between the women happen, but Lincoln still struck me as kind of creepy? I also seemed to be the only one at book club who actually LIKED Beth's boyfriend and maybe it's because I cast him as Chris Pratt although apparently NO ONE ELSE DID.

Rowell's writing is amazing, readable and relateable, and I loved Doris so very much, mostly because she reminded me of my grandmother whose name was also Doris. I loved the parts about Y2K, and I also loved that the book slowly made you invested in the characters. One particular part, when we discover the miscarriage, was written so extremely beautifully, and made me realize how attached I actually was to these characters. I wanted to know more about Jennifer, I liked Beth and Lincoln, but Rowell left me wanting to know more about Jennifer and how her life turned out. How everything ended up with her husband and just...how her life is. I'm such a sucker though, in all honesty, for when writers aren't afraid to write huge issues like the one she wrote for Jennifer, and watch as the characters grow around it.

I really loved the email format. I'd read a whole book in that type of format, and I did find that the alternating between email and narrative felt slightly jarring. This was Rowell's first book, so I can only imagine that they keep getting better and better.

But really though, when did my standards get so high?

( )
  rachelreading | Oct 17, 2020 |
Pitch-perfect newsroom emailing. ( )
  st3t | Aug 3, 2020 |
Delightful story, interestingly written. The very human characters are slowly built up, given challenging very believable backgrounds. The author writes in a light amusing way, which caused me to often chuckle. It's a cliff hanger ending though. I'll certainly look out for her other books. ( )
  GeoffSC | Jul 25, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 192 (next | show all)
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Dedication
For Kai, who's better than fiction
First words
From: Jennifer Scribner-Snyder
To: Beth Fremont
Sent: Wed, 08/18/1999 9:06AM
Subject: Where are you?

Would it kill you to get here before noon?
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Beth and Jennifer know their company monitors their office e-mail, but they still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers at the newspaper and baring their personal lives like an open book. When Lincoln applied to be an Internet security officer, he hardly imagined he'd be sifting through other people's inboxes like some sort of electronic Peeping Tom. Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help but be entertained and captivated by their stories. But by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. After a series of close encounters and missed connections, Lincoln decides it's time to muster the courage to follow his heart, even if he can't see exactly where it's leading him. This story is about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself, even it is someone you have never met.

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Book description
A strikingly clever and deeply moving story about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself. Even if it's someone you've never met.

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder, coworkers at The Courier, know the newspaper monitors their office e-mail. But they still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers, and baring their personal lives like an open book. Jennifer tells Beth everything she can't seem to tell her husband about her anxieties over starting a family. And Beth tells Jennifer everything, period.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O'Neill still can't believe that it's his job to monitor other people's e-mail. When he applied to be an Internet security officer, he pictured himself protecting the newspaper from dangerous hackers — not sending out memos every time somebody in Accounting forwarded an off-color joke to the person in the next cubicle.

Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't quite bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help being entertained — and captivated — by their stories. But, by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. What would he say to her? "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you?"

With snapping dialogue and irresistible charm, Rainbow Rowell transforms an ordinary IT guy into a lovable and endearing romantic hero and proves that falling in love never happens the way you plan it. Written with whip-smart precision and charm, Attachments is a fresh and energetic debut that marks the arrival of an exciting new voice in fiction.

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