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The Violets of March by Sarah Jio
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The Violets of March (2011)

by Sarah Jio

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6856421,564 (3.74)47
In a mystical place where violets bloom out of season and the air is salt drenched, a heartbroken woman stumbles upon a diary and steps into the life of its anonymous author.
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» See also 47 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 64 (next | show all)
This is my first book by this particular author and it won't be my last. I loved it.
( )
  deb.d | Jun 13, 2019 |
After her marriage breaks up, writer Emily heads to her Aunt Bee's house on Bainbridge Island during the month of March to put her life back together. Bee puts her in a guest room that she's never been in before - a pink room - and in it she finds a diary from 1943, which seems to have connections to her own life. As she reads it, and researches the clues that lie within, she finds that it was written by her grandmother who died....or did she? ( )
  nancynova | Apr 18, 2019 |
This is my first book by this particular author and it won't be my last. I loved it.
( )
  deb115 | Apr 26, 2018 |
Ho letto “Il diario di velluto cremisi” in un giorno solo. È un libro che si legge in fretta e si dimentica altrettanto in fretta, non lascia niente di niente. Personalmente lo trovo malscritto (e anche, probabilmente, maltradotto): un profluvio di aggettivi usati a caso (esempio: “possedeva un fascino impalpabile”, io il fascino palpabile non l’ho mai visto) e di figure retoriche così fruste che non sono più neanche figure retoriche (la mente recupera un ricordo e l’originalissima metafora è quella che accomuna il recupero di un ricordo al recupero di un file, complimenti per la creatività!). La trama è stucchevole e melensa, un’antologia di banalità da togliere il fiato: la protagonista-narratrice alle prese con un divorzio perché il marito ha trovato un’altra donna, va a trovare la vecchia zia sull’isola dove questa abita, e dove la protagonista reincontrerà il vecchio amore del liceo che le sta ancora dietro; lei, tuttavia, preferisce la storia travolgente con il figo dell’isola; dopo un po' di tira e molla con gli amici dell'isola, il marito fedifrago torna indietro ma ormai c’è il figo dell’isola, quindi non se ne fa niente; dulcis in fundo, il mistero dell’isola che ti attira a sé e ti lascia andare solo quando lo decide lei: non ho colto proprio nessuna analogia con Lost! Il tutto ruota attorno a un diario trovato per caso dalla protagonista: diario che racconta una storia di famiglia della protagonista, che guarda il caso è del tutto simile alla storia recente della protagonista. In sostanza è come leggere due inutili polpettoni noiosissimi in uno. Io per fortuna questo libro non l’ho comprato, me l’hanno regalato. Sarebbe opportuno che denunciassi chi me l’ha regalato e chiedessi all’autrice di risarcirmi delle quattro ore della mia vita che ho perso per leggere questo romanzaccio da quattro soldi, e che nessuno mi ridarà mai indietro. ( )
  lonelypepper | Feb 22, 2018 |
Loved this story! More than just a love story! A love story from the past intertwined with a love story from the present. Highly recommend! ( )
  mpettit7974 | Dec 21, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 64 (next | show all)
In her twenties, Emily Wilson was on top of the world: she had a bestselling novel, a husband plucked from the pages of GQ, and a one-way ticket to happily ever after.

Ten years later, the tide has turned on Emily's good fortune. So when her great-aunt Bee invites her to spend the month of March on Bainbridge Island in Washington State, Emily accepts, longing to be healed by the sea. Researching her next book, Emily discovers a red velvet diary, dated 1943, whose contents reveal startling connections to her own life.
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"And the riverbank talks of the waters of March / It's the end of all strain, it's the joy in your heart." -- From "Waters of March" by Antonio Carlos Jobim
Dedication
To my grandmothers, Antoinette Mitchell and the late Cecelia Fairchild, who instilled in me the love of art and writing and a fascination with the 1940s
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"I guess this is it," Joel said, leaning into the doorway of our apartment.
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